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... a foreigner has a significant accident (unconscious) and they do not know if he is insured or not -> will they still treat in such a case or not?

I have a good quality private foreign insurance and I have asked them what would have happen in such a case, but they have not been 100% sure themselves and have adviced to ask around within the expat community for some potential experience exchange.

So I hope that someone here does know here something...

 

Regards,

Haxton

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Ps you need to be here 60? Days first before you can sign up as you have to have a currently valid acr card.

 

I went to sign up when I got back and found that out hard way. Mine had expired while I was in the USA.

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http://www.philhealth.gov.ph/members/informal/member.html

 

 
Citizens of other countries working and/or residing in the Philippines

- foreign citizens with valid working permits and/or Alien Certificate of Registrations (ACRs), working and/or residing in the Philippines

 

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USMC-Retired

... a foreigner has a significant accident (unconscious) and they do not know if he is insured or not -> will they still treat in such a case or not?

I have a good quality private foreign insurance and I have asked them what would have happen in such a case, but they have not been 100% sure themselves and have adviced to ask around within the expat community for some potential experience exchange.

So I hope that someone here does know here something...

 

Regards,

Haxton

Your answer is yes and no. Yes they will perform life saving measures if you or a loved one can not demonstrate a means to pay. The answer is no they will not complete any non-essential quality of life measures.

Let me add this may be completed at public hospitals. So buyer beware.

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With apologies, perhaps not a thread hijack, but are there any medallions, bracelets, etc. that can be worn that might give health care workers an indication of coverage/ability to pay/preferred treatment locations/blah, blah, blah?  Just thought of that when reading this thread.

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Goetz1965

Have a copy your PhilHealth Card in your wallet so they can see it.
Have the number of a loved one (In Case of Emergency (ICE number)) with that copy so they can call him or her
Have your PIN codes stored somewhere save where your trusted loved one can access them in case they need money.

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Your answer is yes and no. Yes they will perform life saving measures if you or a loved one can not demonstrate a means to pay. The answer is no they will not complete any non-essential quality of life measures.Let me add this may be completed at public hospitals. So buyer beware.

I have a foreign based medical insurance. For me to use the insurance, I have to pay the hospital charges and then provide itemized bills and such to my insurance carrier. There is no direct payment to the hospital or caregivers with my insurance. In effect, pay as you go. Use of philhealth has the advantage of being commonly available and commonly used by the hospitals. There are limitations though and some cash payment is common (some members have reported of paying nothing for certain procedures).

 

For emergencies, I make sure cash is available.

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RogerDat

Problems with keeping your ID with you in an accident also occur in US. Unscrupulous first res-ponders, and passers by can relive you of your valuables, and ID including any medic alert bracelets. A emergency contact in glove compartment can help, but who knows what will occur.

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With apologies, perhaps not a thread hijack, but are there any medallions, bracelets, etc. that can be worn that might give health care workers an indication of coverage/ability to pay/preferred treatment locations/blah, blah, blah?  Just thought of that when reading this thread.

Medical alert bracelets are not common here according to my physicians. However, medical privacy is pretty much non existent here, so carrying a note with pertinent info might help.

 

There's a recent thread on the topic of emergency care for a fellow who suffered a stroke (?) and was provided weeks of care using his thumbprint as a means to gain access to funds.

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