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RogerDuMond

My wife said about half, but what does she know?

 

 

Which is about 50% better than the US.

 

 

 

 

This is for those who brought their wives back to a western country, did you notice how much they learned so quickly once arriving, well my wife was 26 years old when she came to the US and just being in the US and traveling around the US with me, she has gained so much knowledge and become so worldly,

 

My wife wasn't uneducated when she came to the U.S. 23 years ago, so I guess her learning curve would no be as great. I would guess that she has taught people more than she has learned since arriving in the U.S.

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I have 2 stepdaughters   20 yr old in 4th year college at Southwestern for teaching degree. If she were in the USA she would be far behind as she graduated in 10th grade and is on track to finish wi

I have to agree.  I went to rubbish state schools in the UK, left with no qualifications at 16. Well, a 25 yard swimming certificate.  Still managed through dedication and focus to become successful.

If so..  what is it that brought you here in the first place..  there must be something about the Philippines that you love.   And though you might like to get "back" to the UK..  your wife and kids

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My wife wasn't uneducated when she came to the U.S. 23 years ago, so I guess her learning curve would no be as great. I would guess that she has taught people more than she has learned since arriving in the U.S.

My wife was not uneducated either if that was what you were foolishly trying to insinuate but she still learned so much more in the US.

 

BTW Roger, you skirted my other earlier questions, where did your wife get all of her education and why is she working in the US 8 months a year away from you if jobs pay so much in the Philippines and are so easy to get, as you seem to insinuate they would have been for you? 

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Which is about 50% better than the US.

 

If you say so. Just remember that your wife is in that 100% you just wrote off ;)

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musicman666

Quite an eye opener ....a high grade esf school in Hong Kong is equal in price to Cebu international school....reminds me of those Asian dollar rate resorts that somehow just get away with charging whatever they feel like.

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Headshot

The average Filipino here is industrious, courteous, and devoted to family.

 

From what I have seen, there is no more an "average" Filipino than there is an "average" American or an "average" Brit. The landscape on what is average in any country is continually changing. However, that doesn't really matter. Your children's friends will NOT likely be what you consider "average" Filipinos, Americans or Brits anyway regardless of where you live. Nobody has a big enough friend base to come up with an average. You have to base your decisions on the actual people you (or your children) come in contact with.

 

Some Filipinos are exactly as you describe them. However, there are also Filipinos who are dishonest, conniving, vengeful, jealous, immoral, two-faced, gossipy, lazy, irresponsible, narcissistic, or just plain mean. The same is true for Americans and Brits (or any other nationality). Unfortunately, as your children grow older, you will have less and less say in who they pick as friends. All you can do is to teach them well when they are young, and hope the lessons will carry through with them to their teenage years and adulthood.

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Headshot

To the OP, I would say that there are some big differences between education in the Philippines and education in the West. However, it isn't as simple as saying one is good and the other is bad. There are also huge differences between different schools in the Philippines and between different schools in the West. I won't go so far as to say all Philippine public schools are bad. That would be patently untrue. Just like anywhere, a school's philosophy, administration and teachers can make a huge difference in the education the children receive. Science high schools are public, and every year many thousands of students (many the product of private schools) are turned away because they don't meet the minimum requirements for entry. Those students who do get in can expect a technical education (math and sciences) at least equal to any technical education they could get from a public high school anyplace in the world. However, most high schools in the Philippines won't offer a student nearly that good an education.

 

Most elementary learning, throughout the world, is taught by rote memorization. No other educational system in the world is better at rote memorization than the system in the Philippines (provided too much time isn't siphoned off for singing, dancing and other non-value activities). Even in elementary, the top-end schools are better at this than other schools. Unfortunately, the rote memorization is continued right through the secondary years in the Philippines as well. The secondary years are when students should be learning how to think independently, and most students in the Philippines will never learn how to think independently. That isn't to say that none will. Remember, I said there are huge differences between schools. The top-end schools (international schools and SHS Ateneo schools run by the Jesuits) do a much better job of teaching independent thinking than public schools or run-of-the-mill private schools. That, of course, is why the rich send their children to top-end schools. Even in those top-end high schools, however, there is still too much emphasis on rote memorization and group study and not enough emphasis on individual study and individual research.

 

My conclusion is this. If you can find a top-end school to send your children to for their pre-elementary and elementary years, then do so. Your children will likely get a great education that rivals anything they would likely receive in your home country. If you can't send your children to a top-end school (because there are none in your area), then either move so you can or know that you will have to drastically change your lifestyle to aid in your children's education. Give up any idea that you can change your child's school's curriculum or educational philosophy. That is even LESS possible in the Philippines than it is in schools in the West. First of all, DepEd rules (which apply to all schools in the Philippines) state that parents shall not be allowed on school grounds without an appointment. Many schools carry that to an extreme, while others allow parents to come into the school and talk with teachers when they are picking up their children.

 

Going into secondary grades (7-12) is a totally different picture. Any above-average secondary schools in your home country will give your children a better general (not just technical) education than even the best secondary schools in the Philippines. For me, the solution is simple. I want to move my family to the US before my daughter goes into the secondary grades. Until then, I will keep her in SHS Ateneo de Cebu (there are also SHS Ateneo schools in Davao, Iloilo and Manila). International schools are quite a bit pricier (out of my budget), and they are only in the metro areas. I don't see any advantage to them unless you are worried about your child receiving religious instruction as part of the curriculum.

 

Of course, if I sell my home before my daughter finishes elementary, that would be fine too. We will move to the US at the end of the current school year of whatever year we sell our home. I want her to have a clean break between classes in the Philippines and classes in the US, so she will finish the school year in the Philippines and then start the next school year in the US in the fall. In the US, like here in the Philippines, we will choose where we live at least partially based on the quality of the schools she will attend. The basics she receives in pre-elementary and the early elementary grades at SHS Ateneo should stand her in good stead regardless of where we go in the US.

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broden

as far as education where ever you go it depends on the schools.. there are almost always better schools and worse schools..

 

but much more than the schools it depends on parental involvement.. which i find most teachers are begging for.. at least at the schools my kiddo has been in

 

we really like the school he has settled in to here. he entered the 6th grade yesterday ..he begins foreign language this year he chose spanish.. and he spent time every day all summer preparing for that on his own with a program to teach foreign language called duolingo..

 

he gets another elective class and he chose applied science.. as part of his science curriculum they take part in a nation wide program called science olympiad.. which becomes an elective within an elective on the first day of class they handed out a huge packet of different things each kid or team of 2 kids can work on.. he chose one that studies the evolution of stars and other objects and locating things in the universe and such.. this is right in his wheelhouse.. he spent most of the summer going over the cosmology courses on kahn's academy .. and has begun going over them again.so he has basically 3 periods of science and 3 periods of math most days.... 

 

i find the difference now days to when i went to school to be.. when i went teachers would not let you fail.. now days they will but the tools are there to do great and if the student, and by extension the students family, choose to take up those tools the teachers will break their back to help you. 

 

of course there are good and bad teachers aside from all that... but luckily for us our boy has never had a bad one.. but there is the old saying about making your own luck .. 

 

 

as far as raising your kids where i think you can make the best of where ever you are... but i think there is more opportunity in the states than in the RP , life after school wise.

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later on in life and your kids are teenagers and graduating and they give a feck about everything and smoke pot - what do you do.

 

But I guess that's Canada, even the prime minister smokes pot, haha.

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Headshot

as far as education where ever you go it depends on the schools.. there are almost always better schools and worse schools..

 

but much more than the schools it depends on parental involvement..

 

That is a given, but a child with involved parents in a good school will still be better off than that same child at a bad school. Likewise, a child whose parents are NOT involved will still likely be better off in a good school than the same child in a bad school. For a child to receive the best shot at a great education, it takes both parental involvement AND a good school with good teachers. Finding a good school in the Philippines requires a lot more research than finding a good school in the US. In the US, almost every area has at least some good schools, but that is NOT the case in the Philippines. The website http://www.greatschools.org makes it very easy to find good schools in the US. There is no similar rating system in the Philippines. About all you have is references from other parents and students on their experiences at various schools, which is more limited and more likely to be biased.

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USMC-Retired

Our number one priority when buying a home was the school district. Then everything else. We used great school as a tool and another called school digger.

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delancey

The Philippines seems inferior to first world education, IMO

 

However....

 

The politically correct, multi-cultural walk on egg shells crap in Western education...ughhh!

 

http://www.sideroad.com/Business_Communication/politically-correct-language.html

 

Ask several people within the same cultural group which terms they prefer. Since everyone will not agree, use the term most often stated as acceptable. Include diversity-related questions.

 

Acting like wild Indian...Out of control

Girls (when referring to coworkers) ...Women

Policemen/postman .....Police officer/mail carrier

Manhole...Utility hole

Chairman...Chair

Handicapped..People with special needs; people who are physically/mentally challenged; people with disabilities

Retarded...Developmentally challenged

Gifted children...Advanced learners

Race...Ethnicity or nationality (There is only one race--human)

Uneducated (when referring to adults)...Lacking a formal education

No culture (when referring to parts of the U.S. where the opera and the theater are scarce or nonexistent)...Lacking European culture

The little woman; the wife...Your wife; his wife

"Don't go postal on me!" No alternative; someone in your audience may have relatives who are postal workers

Acting blonde...No alternative

Old people...Seniors; "Chronologically Advantaged"

Bitchy or "PMSing"...Assertive

"White" lie...Lie (Calling it white does not make it okay)

Flip chart ...Easel (Flip is a derogatory word referring to Filipinos)

wheel-chair bound...A person who uses a wheel-chair

Jew down Negotiate

Half-breed Multi-ethnic

Blacklisted Banned

"Manning" the project...Staffing the project

----------------------------------------------------------------

 

Illegal Aliens – Replaced by Undocumented Immigrants. The phrase ‘Illegal Aliens’ implies that these people are a bunch of law-breaking creatures, while ‘Undocumented Immigrants’ suggests that they are good old-fashioned immigrants that simply have not gone through the hassle of being ‘documented’ yet.

 

Failure - Replaced by Deferred Success.

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bahalina buong

From what I have seen, there is no more an "average" Filipino than there is an "average" American or an "average" Brit. The landscape on what is average in any country is continually changing. However, that doesn't really matter. Your children's friends will NOT likely be "average" Filipinos, Americans or Brits anyway regardless of where you live. Nobody has a big enough friend base to come up with an average. You have to base your decisions on the actual people you (or your children) come in contact with.

 

Some Filipinos are exactly as you describe them. However, there are also Filipinos who are dishonest, conniving, vengeful, jealous, immoral, two-faced, gossipy, lazy, irresponsible, narcissistic, or just plain mean. The same is true for Americans and Brits (or any other nationality). Unfortunately, as your children grow older, you will have less and less say in who they pick as friends. All you can do is to teach them well when they are young, and hope the lessons will carry through with them to their teenage years and adulthood.

Good post, but this culture is toxic and corrupt from top to bottom.  And if you swim in higher circles, the kid will just be surrounded by snobbish, arrogant types, learn condescending mentality and deal with the other side of the corruption.   We all want the best for our kids, but this country isn't it.  I've read your posts before on this topic and you had plans to leave when your daughter was a certain age.  Has that changed?  This definitely isn't directed at you, Headshot, but it's always interesting listening to expats try to rationalize raising their kids here.  I presume most made the same rationalizations when they decided to actually have a child.  Kind of an afterthought, or perhaps just the price of admission.

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USMC-Retired

Good post, but this culture is toxic and corrupt from top to bottom. And if you swim in higher circles, the kid will just be surrounded by snobbish, arrogant types, learn condescending mentality and deal with the other side of the corruption. We all want the best for our kids, but this country isn't it. I've read your posts before on this topic and you had plans to leave when your daughter was a certain age. Has that changed? This definitely isn't directed at you, Headshot, but it's always interesting listening to expats try to rationalize raising their kids here. I presume most made the same rationalizations when they decided to actually have a child. Kind of an afterthought, or perhaps just the price of admission.

Knowing Headshot and his wife (who is a school teacher) his approach is one of the best. Educate child at best possible schools to the tipping point. Once you reach the tipping point move to western education system. It is hard to know where this point is yet at least his current approach combineds the blend of two cultures. Headshot's approach is one of the best and understanding the flaws of the Philippine education system. Moving once elementary education is complete I believe is smart. The justification mentality or rationalizing a decision to educate your child completely in the Philippines is beyond my common sense thinking. Some have no choice or do not want to bring thier 20 something wife back to the west. Each have thier own reasons as to why not. The one's that anger me are the selfish motivations that ignore your childern/wife's future beyond thier life.

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This is for those who brought their wives back to a western country, did you notice how much they learned so quickly once arriving, well my wife was 26 years old when she came to the US and just being in the US and traveling around the US with me, she has gained so much knowledge and become so worldly, that I know that she never could have or would have learned that much had she stayed in the Philippines, how about you other guys, is your wife amazing you how much she is learning, now that she is in a first world country????

 

Well my point is, if an adult can learn that much, how much more would a child learn when given the chance of a first world life. 

 

I can't help but think your vision is clouded on this subject.  In my opinion, and experience, the US is one of the worst countries in the world to visit to become more 'wordly'.  Unless your perspective is that learning more about the US and kano culture equals worldliness.  Remember, you have to look at it from both angles - what might be learned by someone that you lifted out of Kansas and dropped into phils as well as the reverse.

 

I just see the 'typical' American as being very, very isolated from the world in general.  This can and has been illustrated in many ways, it's not something that I think can even be argued.  And I'm not sure that a leading a 'first world life' would have any positive influence on someones 'worldliness', more likely the opposite in my mind.  

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delancey

I just see the 'typical' American as being very, very isolated from the world in general.  This can and has been illustrated in many ways, it's not something that I think can even be argued.  And I'm not sure that a leading a 'first world life' would have any positive influence on someones 'worldliness', more likely the opposite in my mind.

 

U.S. citizen and I agree. The typical American is isolated and miopic about what a big world it is out there because they are threatened by it. They want protection from it not to explore it.

 

Worldly gets confused with overall quality of life. I think that's how people who think the U.S. is worldly may be defining. It certainly is an incredibly desirable place to try to obtain citizenship from. It has world class elements leaving the Philippines in the dust- but it is not worldly.

 

The exact opposite.

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