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USMC-Retired

 

Are we forgetting the difference in the cost of living between the two places?

Commodities in life are equal. The finer things are equal. At 12,000 pesos a month I will never earn enough to buy a new car. Expectations change when your raised and live in the PH not the cost.

 

Nationally ranked High School is where my kids are located.

 

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/texas/districts/fort-bend-independent-school-district/clements-high-school-19064

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I have 2 stepdaughters   20 yr old in 4th year college at Southwestern for teaching degree. If she were in the USA she would be far behind as she graduated in 10th grade and is on track to finish wi

I have to agree.  I went to rubbish state schools in the UK, left with no qualifications at 16. Well, a 25 yard swimming certificate.  Still managed through dedication and focus to become successful.

If so..  what is it that brought you here in the first place..  there must be something about the Philippines that you love.   And though you might like to get "back" to the UK..  your wife and kids

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I have noticed here in Australia when Filipino children arrive they struggle at school, once the catch up after a period of time they excel in their learning, my wife used to work at a private school in Surigao city, their school day was from 7am to 5pm, here in Australia its 9am to 3pm, as some said here at times not teachers to teach and much time spent  learning to dance etc, maybe with those extra hours they should teach the basic education not spending time dancing. 

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RogerDuMond

Commodities in life are equal. The finer things are equal. At 12,000 pesos a month I will never earn enough to buy a new car. Expectations change when your raised and live in the PH not the cost.

 

Nationally ranked High School is where my kids are located.

 

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/texas/districts/fort-bend-independent-school-district/clements-high-school-19064

 

 

You need to take other forces into consideration. With the 12,000 peso wages, I assume you are referring to the nursing career mentioned earlier so you are making a comparison without taking into consideration that there is a glut of nurses here and a need for nurses in the US. It all goes back to poor choices being made in the direction of their education and that my friend is the fault of the parents.

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Salty Dog

They problem with schools it Florida anyway, is you have no input into what is taught to your child, so just like the Philippines, a good parent will supplement their child's education.

 

Maybe your public schools are better than they are in Florida.
 

 

There are over 125,000 Schools in the USA

 

Only 6 of the 50 states has a school rated in the top ten.

 

Florida has 1 in the top ten and 4 in the top 30 

 

Pine View School Osprey, FL | Sarasota County Schools  #7 in National Rankings

 

Design and Architecture Senior High Miami, FL | Miami-Dade County Public Schools  #20 in National Rankings

 

International Studies Charter High School Miami, FL | Miami-Dade County Public Schools  #21 in National Rankings

 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School Merritt Island, FL | Brevard Public Schools  #30 in National Rankings

You need to take other forces into consideration. With the 12,000 peso wages, I assume you are referring to the nursing career mentioned earlier so you are making a comparison without taking into consideration that there is a glut of nurses here and a need for nurses in the US. It all goes back to poor choices being made in the direction of their education and that my friend is the fault of the parents.

 

Did your parents choose your college and/or career for you.

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RogerDuMond
Did your parents choose your college and/or career for you.

 

There are guidance councilors available in the US, but no and I certainly wish that they were more involved with my education and the direction of my career.

 

Uncle Sam and the Vietnam war were more involved with my career path.

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USMC-Retired

glut of nurses here and a need for nurses in the US. It all goes back to poor choices being made in the direction of their education and that my friend is the fault of the parents.

No it goes back to education. Because if they could pass the NCLEX they would be hired here.

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RogerDuMond

No it goes back to education. Because if they could pass the NCLEX they would be hired here.

 

 

You may be correct, but last I heard there was a radical decrease in the number allowed to be hired because of the poor state of the US economy..

 

If they had chosen a more appropriate career path WITH parental guidance throughout their school tenure, they wouldn't need to look overseas for appropriate employment.

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RogerDuMond

 

 

Why do you say that, please expound.

 

Even if you home school in Florida, you are constrained by government mandated curriculum.

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bahalina buong

I've a young daughter and she won't be in the Philippines past age 7, however I have to manage that.  You can find quality schools here and supplement their learning, but the culture is the problem.  As another poster said, do you really want your kid to have the mentality of the average filipino?  Parents can only do so much and eventually society will take over and be a bigger influence.  And the kid will figure it out later in life, just exactly how much they got screwed. "Thanks Dad, for raising me in a dirty, corrupt 3rd world culture.  I'm so glad I didn't grow up in a civilized, first world country full of opportunities and advantages.  That would have really sucked."  

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RogerDuMond

 

 

As another poster said, do you really want your kid to have the mentality of the average filipino?

 

Yes it is quite preferable to the mentality of the 1st world children of today.

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smokey

yes roger  the cost of living now you tell me child goes to 4 years of college 6 months of review and 1 year as a candy striper and if it was thru student loans instead of free ride she would own about 1 million peso and now that she has 6 years experience she earns 12,000 peso a month that is not a living wage for a professional in my book  you try LIVING on 12,000 peso a month its a JOKE

 

 

oh and don't forget that is BEFORE taxes

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smokey

You may be correct, but last I heard there was a radical decrease in the number allowed to be hired because of the poor state of the US economy..

 

If they had chosen a more appropriate career path WITH parental guidance throughout their school tenure, they wouldn't need to look overseas for appropriate employment.

 

well roger you heard wrong nurses are not hired because they are not up to par with min. requirements to hold the job and that is not the parents fault its the schools fault

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RogerDuMond

 

 

its a JOKE

 

And so is your answer, it makes absolutely no sense. You can't use costs of education in America and equate it to wages in the Philippines. Get with the program Smokey.

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RogerDuMond
roger you heard wrong nurses are not hired because they are not up to par with min. requirements

 

 

2015

 

 

"It would not be a stretch to say that even more than the economy, the increased scrutiny on H1B visa applications and H1B petitions has been the reason for fall in the H1B visa demand. For the first time ever, the number of H1B petitions withdrawn by applicants or rejected by U.S. has exceeded the number submitted"

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I hate to break it to you, but NOT all Filipino want to leave the Philippines.  Many like it here. Is that ok with you?

Some people willingly choose it here, some are forced to.

 

Most people do love their countries, because they never have a choice and they don't know better. Would you rather have your kids growing up like that?

 

I know a Filipino here in the USA who did all 10 years of his primary/secondary schooling in Philippine public schools, then was accepted to a top regional university in the USA. He now works as a project engineer at one of the world's leading tech companies, making a quite handsome salary.

It can be always be better. If he's given all the best his opportunities would no doubt be far greater.

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