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Bringing Up Children Here?


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TheWhiteKnight

Probably not here Lee.

 

But education has to be paid for.  And you get what you pay for.  But the OP wants the tax payer to pay for his kids education, and that's where I am butting in.  As a UK tax payer I disagree with paying for the education of kids who are not British born.

 

They are British citizens, you really are against that? Pretty extreme.

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I have 2 stepdaughters   20 yr old in 4th year college at Southwestern for teaching degree. If she were in the USA she would be far behind as she graduated in 10th grade and is on track to finish wi

I have to agree.  I went to rubbish state schools in the UK, left with no qualifications at 16. Well, a 25 yard swimming certificate.  Still managed through dedication and focus to become successful.

If so..  what is it that brought you here in the first place..  there must be something about the Philippines that you love.   And though you might like to get "back" to the UK..  your wife and kids

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TheWhiteKnight

We've got 2 children, 4 and 2 and although I like it here the thought of my children being brought up/educated here and not in the UK doesn't really appeal to me.

 

I don't know if it's a racist thing or what... perhaps I've got a negative view of Filipinos because of my wife's family or the area where we live... but whatever it is I keep finding myself saying - I'd like to get us out of here and back to a "normal" type of life in the UK.

 

Am I the only one ?

 

You are among the few that will admit these feelings. Half are trapped here and have to justify / try claim the education can be just as good, even better. Pretty selfish to keep them here if you can get them set up in the UK. They will get over the missing their amazing "culture" and eventually thank you for it when they have real opportunities in their life.

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Kabisay-an gid

How many of Philippine students get admitted into Oxford or MIT every year?

So one must graduate from Oxford or MIT in order to get a quality university education and be successful in life? Safe to say then that 99.9% plus of Taiwanese nationals lack a quality university education and success in life, since that percentage never got admitted to Oxford or MIT.

 

I know a Filipino here in the USA who did all 10 years of his primary/secondary schooling in Philippine public schools, then was accepted to a top regional university in the USA. He now works as a project engineer at one of the world's leading tech companies, making a quite handsome salary.

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We were in the same position, took the decision to move back to the UK for education and healthcare reasons. Don't underestimate the hassle and cost this takes, separated for a year whilst the visa requirements were met. We desperately miss the RP for many reasons but as soon as the offspring come along priorities naturally change. We would have loved to find an international school but wages and savings just wouldn't have covered it. Son (4.5) starts school in a couple of weeks and daughter (2.5) already in nursery and seemingly doing well, not that that couldn't happen in the RP of course.

 

As for entitlement, 25 years of contributions into the system and I think I deserve something irrespective of where he was born

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I have 2 stepdaughters

 

20 yr old in 4th year college at Southwestern for teaching degree. If she were in the USA she would be far behind as she graduated in 10th grade and is on track to finish with an Associates degree compared to US colleges. She is trying very hard but struggling as learning doesn't come as natural to her as others in the family.

 

10 yr old in 6th grade at private "home school" type setting as part of the Inchland Academy in Mandaue. Speaks English, Spanish, Tagalog, Cebuano, German, some Japanese and sign language. She is reading at a 10th grade level and a mathematical whiz. She attends class 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year and they celebrate no holidays. She also plays piano and guitar.  I can't imagine being in the US would help her at all.

 

Most of our family in general is very smart. 9 out of 10 have been valedictorians graduating high school. The niece currently in high school in Consolacion was valedictorian when graduating elementary and is on track to be valedictorian when she graduates 12th grade.

 

Lola runs a VERY TIGHT ship and putting off schoolwork is not allowed, neither are video games and "hanging out" with friends.

 

 

Is that good for the kids, like not hanging out with friends.

 

 

I would not allow the hard ship course, she probably be a virgin at 35 and still looking.

 

No offense, sorry couldn't help it, lol.

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Yes, I was a complete loser up to grade 10. I have more degrees now (Germany) than anybody I ever met can handle. Today, I don't even bother telling people my accomplishments. It does not matter in business anyway and only worth something when you want to get hired.

 

Back on topic, our son gets more education than back in Canada, but I still think the educational system is better in Canada, more like Montessori. The kids have a better life.

 

He won't do his High School in PH, for sure.

 

Too much distraction with hot girls, lol.

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USMC-Retired

My next door neighbour, who happens to also be my wife's cousin, is an elementary school administrator.  He is a dedicated hard working man, and often spends his time when not at school, working on his house.  His wife is also a teacher.  They have three children, each of whom is very engaged and doing well in school.  He has a beautiful 2 story house on a modest but not small lot in the province.  He had the finances to recently buy the lot and house on the other side of his place from mine.  Over the last 2 years he's been slowly joining the two houses together to make a larger house, and living quarters for his mother, and his wife's parents. He is in his 40's.

 

Neither he nor his wife was born with a silver spoon.  They work hard.  They are frugal, and prudent.  They are exemplary parents and neighbours. They don't spend what they don't have.  They will both retire with GSIS pensions.  modest..  but comfortable.

 

I know this is uncommon in the Philippines, but it IS possible, given a good work ethic, and prudent habits.

 

Flip burgers for 40 years you will have SS Dollars in the US. Which is far greater then they ever earned. Yet theses are apples and bananas because expectations and fiances are diffrent. Jobs in the PH are plentiful at 250 pesos a day. Just enough for one to live on. That is why your best and brightest are leaving in droves as OFW. This program is killing the country and killing the growth.

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cebubird

You are among the few that will admit these feelings. Half are trapped here and have to justify / try claim the education can be just as good, even better. Pretty selfish to keep them here if you can get them set up in the UK. They will get over the missing their amazing "culture" and eventually thank you for it when they have real opportunities in their life.

 

Great post and absolutely correct!!!!!!!

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If you live in a rural area then it would be difficult to find a good school for your kids.  You will have to move into the city.  Ask around where the rich send their kids to school and start from there.  Education system here isn't bad, right up to highschool.  It's on par with western standards.  They still have to pass a rigid exam to get into a university and it's very competitive.  The teacher-student ratio in a classroom is higher than western standards but most parents hire a private tutor anyway.  Education mostly has to do with parenting skills, and less to do with school.  Most of the learning is done at home.  Look at how thick the texbooks are.  They're not meant to be read in class.  They are meant to be read at home.  The teacher's job is to explain what you have read last night.  A private tutor would help a lot.

 

It's at the college level that I have my doubts.  They lack proper equipment.  Their teaching method are archaic.  It relies too much on memorization than understanding.

 

The affluent usually send their kids abroad for college.

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USMC-Retired

If you live in a rural area then it would be difficult to find a good school for your kids.  You will have to move into the city.  Ask around where the rich send their kids to school and start from there.  Education system here isn't bad, right up to highschool.  It's on par with western standards.  They still have to pass a rigid exam to get into a university and it's very competitive.  The teacher-student ratio in a classroom is higher than western standards but most parents hire a private tutor anyway.  Education mostly has to do with parenting skills, and less to do with school.  Most of the learning is done at home.  Look at how thick the texbooks are.  They're not meant to be read in class.  They are meant to be read at home.  The teacher's job is to explain what you have read last night.  A private tutor would help a lot.

 

It's at the college level that I have my doubts.  They lack proper equipment.  Their teaching method are archaic.  It relies too much on memorization than understanding.

 

The affluent usually send their kids abroad for college.

Your post is contradictive. Higher teacher ratios, books are meant to be read at home, hire private tutor yet say it is on par with elementary educational western standard.

 

The bottom line it is not on par. Only private education may be on par with public education in the states (your mileage will very depending on your willingness to relocate). Then you must still supplement that education in the PH.

 

The educational experince for your children in the PH will be a direct reflection of your involvement. There is no way around it.

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To the OP, I hope you consider that much of this response is from those who have various agendas, not pertaining to the well being of your family. I wouldn't want to seefhediscussion limited to just members who have or had school aged children. However, you seemed willing to make your thoughts known and ask for opinions and advice from members who have lived through the experience of educating children here. Some posts deal more with proper use of tax dollars and such, which seems a bit misplaced considering your interests.

 

I've also noticed an amusing bit of arrogance when posts from members are dismissed as useless because they are fooling themselves into believing good things happen in the Philippines. I've lived here a longtime, raised several children and have two SIL as well as numerous cousins who are teachers, both in DEPED and private. From that as a basis, I have concluded the education system is and has been in need of improvements, I also beleive it won't improve much while my kids are being educated here. So, there's no rose colored glasses being worn by me.

 

That said, I very satisfied with the education my children have gotten here. Where you live, there are several private schools, some right in Baybay city. As well, the nearby large university, Visayas State University, VSU, has a private elementary as well as a laboratory high school. If that isn't enough, ormoc city, a much longer commute, is commonly a place people take their kids for school.

 

So much of the education of the kids comes from the effort the family makes to assist. Even with mediocre schools, a child can be well educated and go on to higher education with a good foundation......all here.

 

I know there are the elitist members who only "want the best" for their children, and good on them. However, I'm convinced that a well educated and well adapted family can do fine here. This is not because I am rejecting any country or such. I'm happy to be here as assume you were.

 

Good luck with the decision making.

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smokey

reality check..... we have a daughter school teacher .... 14,000 peso a month  ... another with 2 degrees mech. engineering and civil ... she earns the most 24,000 month then a nurse she makes the least works major hospital ICU and makes ... wait for it ..... wait for it... 12,000 peso a month   now one daughter moved to usa married and is a change girl in a casino and makes WITHOUT tips 100,000 peso a month.....

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USMC-Retired

reality check..... we have a daughter school teacher .... 14,000 peso a month  ... another with 2 degrees mech. engineering and civil ... she earns the most 24,000 month then a nurse she makes the least works major hospital ICU and makes ... wait for it ..... wait for it... 12,000 peso a month   now one daughter moved to usa married and is a change girl in a casino and makes WITHOUT tips 100,000 peso a month.....

The sooner they have a western mentality, education and opportunity can substaial increase future earning power.

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Salty Dog

If an expat wants to educate their children in the place where he was from. What right does a stranger on the internet have to tell him he's wrong? If you're happy with your choice of your children's education, then good for you. Why do the same few members always take issue to someone saying they aren't impressed with the Philippine's education system or for that matter something else not flattering about the Philippines. I get it, you're proud of your adopted home, the birthplace of your wife and children. Well maybe others still feel the same way about thier home countries too. No one should need to tear someone else down to make themselves feel better. That should be reserved for humor only….

 

Sent from Note 4 using Tapatalk.

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RogerDuMond

 

 

The educational experince for your children in the PH will be a direct reflection of your involvement. There is no way around it.

 

As it will anywhere. They problem with schools it Florida anyway, is you have no input into what is taught to your child, so just like the Philippines, a good parent will supplement their child's education.

 

Maybe your public schools are better than they are in Florida.


reality check..... we have a daughter school teacher .... 14,000 peso a month  ... another with 2 degrees mech. engineering and civil ... she earns the most 24,000 month then a nurse she makes the least works major hospital ICU and makes ... wait for it ..... wait for it... 12,000 peso a month   now one daughter moved to usa married and is a change girl in a casino and makes WITHOUT tips 100,000 peso a month.....

 

 

The sooner they have a western mentality, education and opportunity can substaial increase future earning power.

 

 

Are we forgetting the difference in the cost of living between the two places?

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