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The quality of education if much better in the US. They learn differently. There similar issues confronting teachers in Calif. Kids entering the system who speak little English and only Spanish, slows the teacher down and reduces teaching time to native English speakers. I have heard the issue is similar there, except kids speak tagalog. Do all schools there teach in English only? The frustration to students and teachers increases has they get higher in grades. The US schools have federal guidelines they must meet. But, a woman who goes to nursing school there thinking she is an RN, when she arrives in the US, she is a LVN, which is lower because the requirements are different.

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I have 2 stepdaughters   20 yr old in 4th year college at Southwestern for teaching degree. If she were in the USA she would be far behind as she graduated in 10th grade and is on track to finish wi

I have to agree.  I went to rubbish state schools in the UK, left with no qualifications at 16. Well, a 25 yard swimming certificate.  Still managed through dedication and focus to become successful.

If so..  what is it that brought you here in the first place..  there must be something about the Philippines that you love.   And though you might like to get "back" to the UK..  your wife and kids

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Salty Dog

Tim made an excellent point. No matter how well intentioned a parent may be, that doesn't mean they are good teachers. It takes training.

 

Sent from Note 4 using Tapatalk.

Edited by Salty Dog
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RogerDuMond

Tim made an excellent point. No matter how well intentioned a parent may be, that doesn't mean they are good teachers. It takes training.

 

 

 

My personal opinion is that all it takes is time, dedication, google, and a modicum of intelligence.

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Salty Dog

My personal opinion is that all it takes is time, dedication, google, and a modicum of intelligence.

Well all those members who are Googling modicum better have a smarter wife. But then they married us, and most likely not for our intelligence…

 

Sent from Note 4 using Tapatalk.

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No you are incorrect. If I was properly educated in the Philippines in a field where jobs existed, I could easily afford to retire in the country with a small herd of goats at the age of 67.

I guess you should tell that to the millions of OFW who had to leave to get decent paying jobs in many different professions but of course they did not become goat owners. Speaking of goats, do you own your home and property that you have the goats on, how much did that cost and if you do own it, do you actually believe that you would have been able to buy it on a Philippine salary. And BTW, is it your wife who works in the US  :unsure: and if so why is that if there are so many great jobs in the Philippines?

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fred42

Well all those members who are Googling modicum better have a smarter wife. But then they married us, and most likely not for our intelligence…

 

Sent from Note 4 using Tapatalk.

 

Talk for yourself!

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to_dave007

do you own your home and property that you have the goats on, how much did that cost and if you do own it, do you actually believe that you would have been able to buy it on a Philippine salary.

 

My next door neighbour, who happens to also be my wife's cousin, is an elementary school administrator.  He is a dedicated hard working man, and often spends his time when not at school, working on his house.  His wife is also a teacher.  They have three children, each of whom is very engaged and doing well in school.  He has a beautiful 2 story house on a modest but not small lot in the province.  He had the finances to recently buy the lot and house on the other side of his place from mine.  Over the last 2 years he's been slowly joining the two houses together to make a larger house, and living quarters for his mother, and his wife's parents. He is in his 40's.

 

Neither he nor his wife was born with a silver spoon.  They work hard.  They are frugal, and prudent.  They are exemplary parents and neighbours. They don't spend what they don't have.  They will both retire with GSIS pensions.  modest..  but comfortable.

 

I know this is uncommon in the Philippines, but it IS possible, given a good work ethic, and prudent habits.

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I know this is uncommon in the Philippines, but it IS possible, given a good work ethic, and prudent habits.

and with some luck of being in the right place at the right time and making the right job choice that happened to turn out right.

 

My point was, that from what I have seen, there are many more people who do not make it than those that do make it. I have talked to girls and guys with college degrees, who work in sales, are waiters and lots of everyday jobs and they never seem to be able to get ahead, even when they are savers, but some must, there are lots of houses and condos owned by locals but possibly a lot of those are OFW's or families of OFW's. :unsure:

 

I doubt that I would be in the position that I am today had I been born in the Philippines and had worked in the same jobs in the Philippines, God bless them all, and I pray for a better life for them all. At least on our SS system and pension systems, after working to retirement age, a person might get a decent amount a month, not so in the Philippines for many.

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to_dave007

My personal opinion is that all it takes is time, dedication, google, and a modicum of intelligence.

 

I agree with you Roger.

 

In my home, just 6 months ago, I was faced with the reality that my two sons did not speak English as well as I thought they should.  I confess that I was really annoyed with this for a while, and blamed this on everyone else, before I finally decided to stop complaining and start thinking how can I change it. So we just changed our routines a bit, and added something we call "stories" to our dinner time.  We had always sat together for dinner, and I had always been annoyed at the lack of English from my sons.  So the idea behind "stories" is that everyone at the table has to tell a story before any of us can leave the table.  Initially, we kept the stories very simple, to get the boys used to it..  and they would just describe an animal.  But within a month they were describing their favorite superhero, and these days, they are talking about what they did at Kinder..  or what they played out back..  or talking about what the want to learn in the pool the next time they go. (Ah..  we have a rule about the pool too..  Got to describe something new you want to try before you get to go). On the weekend we went to a restaurant up in Bogo, and the place had big black board menu, and we played a game where the boys tried to sound out words on the menu..  like apple (apple pie) and mango (mango shake) and pizza.  And at dinner tonight they were both eagerly proposing words that started with G..  or S.  And our dinner table is 100% English now, and their young cousin, son of my wife's sister, often wants to eat with us as well, and actively joins in.

 

This transition has happened over just 6 months, largely from such a SIMPLE family tradition as "stories" at the dinner table.

Edited by to_dave007
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I know this is uncommon in the Philippines, but it IS possible, given a good work ethic, and prudent habits.

And you think it's good enough? Sounds more like they're stuck in Philippines. Where else can they go? Somalia?

 

It's entirely different from American retiree being able to choose a country he or she likes.

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to_dave007

And you think it's good enough? Sounds more like they're stuck in Philippines. Where else can they go? Somalia?

 

It's entirely different from American retiree being able to choose a country he or she likes.

 

You are more than welcome to aspire to whatever goals you wish.  But when you disrespect what other good people do with THEIR lives, you don't really seem like you have it all as together as you think you do.

 

I hate to break it to you, but NOT all Filipino want to leave the Philippines.  Many like it here. Is that ok with you?

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rainymike

How many of Philippine students get admitted into Oxford or MIT every year?

 

The Philippine Science High School is a public school. They do a fine job of providing education. This special type of high school model is being replicated at other public schools as well. In their opinion nearly half of their graduates could qualify for MIT.

 

http://www.canadianinquirer.net/2014/08/12/46-percent-of-philippine-science-high-school-graduates-can-enter-mit/

 

The actual numbers who attend MIT doesn't seem that high, but here's a perspective from a pinoy who is at MIT. Does give insight into his experience there.

 

https://www.quora.com/What-is-it-like-being-a-Filipino-at-MIT

 

However, let's be realistic ... I can see many other ways that my kids could be successful in life. If one of my kids wanted to be a carpenter or cook or housewife, that would be fine with me as well. LOL ... I do draw the line at any wanting to be a shabu dealer though.

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TheWhiteKnight

British School Manila ... gonna be quite expensive to live here and have a kid. Not sure if it's worth it when the time comes.

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RogerDuMond

 

 

I have talked to girls and guys with college degrees, who work in sales, are waiters and lots of everyday jobs and they never seem to be able to get ahead,

 

What do you blame that on?

 

My opinion is that it is a parental failure. There is no guidance in school or at home to help students choose an appropriate career path before entering college. They choose a popular path such as teacher or nurse. Wonderful occupations both, but they are extremely overcrowded with graduates so that only the top graduates get a job in the field of their degree. This is much like the US graduate with a bachelor of arts degree that ends up flipping burgers.

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TheWhiteKnight

 

me for food! no idea why everyone else seem to hate it..

 

 

That's easy because you are used to eating shitty food back home. This is just a natural extension I guess. I would have figured Taiwan had better but I guess not.

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