Jump to content

Bringing Up Children Here?


Recommended Posts

bargeman

No you haven't. A first-world citizen needs not to trouble himself with the shitty aspect of hard life like here. I'm sure your kids could be very happy learning anything they want in a first-world country like Denmark or Norway, but first you have to get them there.

You obviously haven't been to Europe lately!!!

Plenty of "shitty and hard live" there.

 

You don't see 'food banks' in the Phils for example, plenty in Europe.

Previous UK Prime Minister urging Supermarkets not to dump food that is 'out of date' but to donate it to the food banks.

A few years ago, Senior Citizens standing in lines in the freezing winter to get a hand out of butter and sugar.

 

If that is being a "first world citizen" then not for me thanks.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 222
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • RogerDuMond

    27

  • USMC-Retired

    23

  • smokey

    20

  • Skywalker

    13

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I have 2 stepdaughters   20 yr old in 4th year college at Southwestern for teaching degree. If she were in the USA she would be far behind as she graduated in 10th grade and is on track to finish wi

I have to agree.  I went to rubbish state schools in the UK, left with no qualifications at 16. Well, a 25 yard swimming certificate.  Still managed through dedication and focus to become successful.

If so..  what is it that brought you here in the first place..  there must be something about the Philippines that you love.   And though you might like to get "back" to the UK..  your wife and kids

Posted Images

bargeman

 

 

He isn't my blood, but he needs a hand up, and he and his siblings need a father figure, since their own father abandoned them many years ago.

Similar situation to mine.

I have 3 adopted girls, their own father 'done a runner'.

Along with our own daughter, we have educated them to the best we can find.

Eldest 2 are about to go to USA as Med Techs.

Their qualifications authenticated and accepted by US hospitals.

Not bad for someone educated and brought up in a third world country with a poor education system.

I like to think also that its up to the parents to give children a hand up in life.

In my case, its paid off.


Sounds great, but how do you propose that a poor Filipino family send their children to one of these institutions...

Have less kids for a start.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
to_dave007

.. it is the parents who should make sure their kids are well-educated and secure their future success, whatever it takes or costs…

 

Interesting comment, and one which defines one of the most basic differences in peoples beliefs, even for those of us who believe passionately in higher education for our kids.

 

I do not fully agree with you for the simple reason that your comment ignores the role and responsibility of our children.

 

I come from a working class English Irish background.  My granddad on my mothers side had 4 years of school, and my grandmother on my dad's side was a chamber maid in Covent Garden in London.  Of ALL their descendants, I was the first to graduate university (self funded), and my oldest daughter was the second.  My first wife and I decided early on in our divorce that we would assist our children to ensure they graduated university with no debt, but that university with be primarily their responsibility.  Our kids had to have a plan, and a budget, and savings of their own, even for first year university.  They already knew this mid way through high school, and we talked to them, and coached them, through this period.  And I was lucky enough to be able to give each of my kids a couple of well paying contract jobs to boost their savings.  But it was THEIR savings and THEIR university program, even at age 18.

 

My oldest daughter graduated a Masters Degree in Architecture in Canada, with no debt, in her mid 20's.  Partly from her parents help, partly from her own earnings, partly from a $25,000 scholarship she won for her Masters, and partly because SHE choose to be financially prudent, most importantly delaying purchase of a car until after she graduated.

 

My oldest son..  same thing.  He worked and paid a large part of his schooling himself..  My ex and I simply helped make sure he did not fail.  He had a bit more trouble picking a direction he could stick with, but eventually he accomplished that, and he's off on his own path now.

 

MY 20 year old, by my second wife, will soon enter 2nd year of an RN programme now in Canada.  She had $17,000 saved before her first year started, and her mother and I set about 1/2 of her university costs aside.  It's HER programme, and HER budget, and she knows what she will get from mum and dad, and she knows what she must accomplish, and she knows that mum and dad expect her to accomplish it, but that we also won't let her fail.

 

My 15 year old daughter is already well along on the same path..  Highly intelligent and independent.  Boxing and judo and cosplay costume making in the evenings.  Eager to begin work on weekends this year at the local theatre.  Surrounded by positive and constructive friends, each of whom is "doing things"..  and not just "hanging out".  University savings from mum and dad already in the bank..  ready to go..  and my daughter already knows that it will be HER programme, and HER budget..  and that mum and dad will make a debt free degree achievable.. by HER.

 

Same thing across the rest of my family, with some variations.  All our children know that they are EXPECTED to carry themselves from an early age, but that mum and dad are available to "help".  Right now my 28 year old niece, a married mother of 2 boys, is back at university to complete a degree that SHE interrupted years earlier by getting pregnant.  And my brother, a train driver, and home owner, with 8 years of schooling, dug deep in his own pocket to help her achieve it. 

 

It's a difference in parenting philosophies.  I don't want to suggest there is anything wrong with other parents taking FULL responsibility. but in my family, we do not.  From the beginning with our kids, we treat university as THIER programme, and THEIR budget. But if other parents have the means, and desire, to fund their kids education..  no problem..  their choice.  But in my family, even though we COULD afford to fully pay the university, we treat this as a form of tough love, to ensure that our kids come out of university fully capable to stand on their own 2 feet as mature adults.  We just back them up, to make sure they don't fail.  And for ALL of us, we treat "debt free" as a valuable objective on graduation day.

 

I am well aware that this equation may need some modification to work in the Philippines, and I don't know yet how we will eventually settle it.  But you can be 100% sure that my two Filipino sons will know, well before they graduate high school, that THEY must take ownership their university program, and budget, but that mum and dad will backstop them to make sure they can accomplish it.  It's our job, as parents, to get them to that place and time with the right skills and knowledge and habits

 

One additional thought....

 

I was born in the UK (Surrey) and lived most of my life in Canada.  So this means I have the ability to help my sons gain "status" in either or both of these countries, and that's already slowly going on in the background.  Since we currently do not intend to be RESIDENT in either Canada or the UK, I'm not sure yet what limitations will exist, but if I can get my sons status that may open educational opportunities for them, I will. 

Edited by to_dave007
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Kabisay-an gid

there it is everyone move to manila if you have children and stop spending money on stupid stuff like cars and women and beer and put your kids in this school

 

As a high school dropout whose post-secondary education was at the Big House , I realize you probably don't understand how the whole college thing works. They have something called dormitories where the students stay - you and the whole family don't have to move - you just send the kid off to college like they do in the U.S.

 

I'm also amused that USMC thinks somebody has to attend a college that's ranked high on some international list in order to be successful. A couple Filipinos named Henry Sy and Lucio Tan attended college at Far Eastern University in Manila, which isn't ranked highly on any international lists, and today they're the two wealthiest men in the Philippines with a combined net worth of about $15 to $20 BILLION U.S.

 

Hopefully the Pinoy bashers can keep us informed as to how well their kids do at those oh so superior colleges in their own countries. Hopefully they won't end up as a couple of "losers" like Sy and Tan who attended one of those "inferior" Philippine universities!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

screw school it does nothing but help you do the crossword puzzle on sunday  , I never wanted to be someone elses boy the only college educated guys I knew worked for me...

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
to_dave007

deleted 

Edited by to_dave007
Link to post
Share on other sites
TheWhiteKnight
Hopefully the Pinoy bashers can keep us informed as to how well their kids do at those oh so superior colleges in their own countries. Hopefully they won't end up as a couple of "losers" like Sy and Tan who attended one of those "inferior" Philippine universities!

 

LOL. You can't be serious. I'll let some one else comment on why this comparison to the opportunities of normal Filipino's is a total joke.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Highlighter

There is a reason why Asian (Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, HK etc etc etc)families who can afford it send their kids to schools / universities in Australia, NZ, Canada, USA, UK

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a reason why Asian (Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, HK etc etc etc)families who can afford it send their kids to schools / universities in Australia, NZ, Canada, USA, UK

What is the reason?

Link to post
Share on other sites
USMC-Retired
I'm also amused that USMC thinks somebody has to attend a college that's ranked high on some international list in order to be successful. A couple Filipinos named Henry Sy and Lucio Tan attended college at Far Eastern University in Manila, which isn't ranked highly on any international lists, and today they're the two wealthiest men in the Philippines with a combined net worth of about $15 to $20 BILLION U.S.

 

I am amused you are using two people that went Chinese Private School and then University in the 1950s and 1960s as your shinning example of the education system of the Philippines TODAY some 60+ years later.     As you sit there in the US earning a solid living and have the ability to one day retire in the Philippines. Something that the average Filipino will never have the opportunity to do. Much less leave the 3Km block in their life.  The subject is Bringing your Children up in the Philippines with the current educational standards.  

 

It is even more than just that it is about opportunity that the system does not afford a young mind,  It is about what do they have once they complete that education  and is the standard high enough for companies and Universities to accept them.  It is about having the right mentality so that western companies want them in the mix.  

Edited by USMC-Retired
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDuMond

There is a reason why Asian (Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, HK etc etc etc)families who can afford it send their kids to schools / universities in Australia, NZ, Canada, USA, UK

 

 

What is the reason?

 

 

Prestige

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
miles-high

There is a reason why Asian (Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, HK etc etc etc)families who can afford it send their kids to schools / universities in Australia, NZ, Canada, USA, UK

What makes you think Clinton Jr High (Clinton, AR) is better than Ateneo de Cebu? I have no idea which is better but I would definitely send my kid, if any to Ateneo de Cebu for college preparatory education… As you listed all English-speaking countries in your post, “academic excellence” is not necessarily the only reason they send their kids to… to learn the language is an important factor in those Asian people in business. If they are wealthier, they would send their kids to perhaps boarding schools in Switzerland to learn a few more languages at the same time (per most Dutch guys ;)). I would think there is no simple answer to these questions but money would help… Ask Senator Pacquiao... he funded and built a well-regarded school for his kids in St. Rosa (NCR)! :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
Highlighter

 

What is the reason?

 

 

Given everything being equal an employer in the west would in the majority of cases choose a candidate with an academic qualification gained from a western university and not one from a third world university. Call it discrimination call it what you want, it's the way it is. Yes there may well be a few exceptions.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDuMond

 

 

It is even more than just that it is about opportunity that the system does not afford a young mind,

 

I will say it again, if you leave the scope and direction of your child's education to the "system", whether in the Philippines or any other country, you are dooming them to mediocrity.

 

The biggest cause of failure in the Philippines is the lack of guidance counseling when choosing a vocation. An engaged parent is going to guide the child properly, because the schools don't do it.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
USMC-Retired

 

 

What makes you think Clinton Jr High (Clinton, AR) is better than Ateneo de Cebu? I have no idea which is better but I would definitely send my kid, if any to Ateneo de Cebu for college preparatory education…

 

Clinton Intermediate is a horrible school and you can get an exact account of the school through various sources.   However do you have to send them to that school opportunity says no you do not have to.  Move to an apartment that has a better school or move to a better area.  It is about opportunities and abilities.  You talk about paying for an education that is on par or less than some of the better public schools in the US.  If you can afford this type of private education and want to remain in the Philippines do it.   

 

You must also consider where will they work in the future?  What are the opportunities in the future?  Did that education give them the best possible opportunity?  Are they going to have the correct mentality as others in that country?  Will the critical thinking be equal considering the differences in technology and society advances?    

 

There are many places that offer great education in the Philippines get ready to pay.  However given a choice would you attend Public education in the Philippines or the US.  Would you attend Public University in the Philippines or US.  If you are going to pay for something why not move back to the US where you can get a quality education just by relocation.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...