Jump to content

Advisability of buying 500 watt tfxr for 450 watt food processor?


Recommended Posts

questsea73

I have a USA 110 volt 450 watt B & Decker food processor bought over from USA.

 

I need to buy a 220 volt to 110 volt transformer here to use processor safely in Philippines.

 

Ace Hardware has a Meiji 500 watt floor model here locally which is apparently "old stock"...no price on it, no box, etc. Restockage on it is "who know when or if".   Clerk advises buying at least the 750 watt transformer(about 400 pesos more) which is apparently stocked for this application.

 

As happened to me in 2013 first trip here hardware clerks advise buying 1000 watt transformer if you have a 500 watt usage with any substantial heat buildup in usage.

 

It seems to me with a food processor with probably most usage being only a couple of minutes or less the stress/load is not very significant on transformer and 500 watt one would serve for my application.  But what do I know? 

 

Any one there have some practical/educated advice on this decision I need to make?

 

Ken

Link to post
Share on other sites
michael_retired

Well, a 500w xformer is only 11% greater than the 450w at steady state (normal usage).

 

I think you need at least 25% greater available for the large inrush current at turn on, 50% would be even better....

 

Just my òpinion based on limited knowledge.

Edited by michael_retired
Link to post
Share on other sites

If your concerned about spending an extra 10 bucks or so this is Probably not what you want to hear.


http://www.voltagesuperstore.com/choosingrightconverter.shtml


You need to know the wattage of your device in order to determine the appropriate voltage converter to purchase so look on the indications label of your device for the W to get this information. Then, be sure to buy a converter with a wattage rating that is two to three times higher than the device you plan to operate in order to safely convert.

For example, if your device or appliance is 600W, get a converter or transformer that is 1200W.

When in doubt, buy a converter with a much higher wattage. No harm is done with too many watts, but your device will not work if there’s not enough.

For items that need a big surge of power when it’s initially switched on (TVs, power tools, laser printers), get a converter with a wattage rate that is THREE times greater than that of your device. So, a 500W tool requires a 1500W converter in order to safely and successfully convert.

Different devices have different needs. For example: A small, non-heating electric shaver should be fine with a 100W voltage converter. However, for bigger items requiring heat, like an iron, curling iron, or hair dryer, you will need a more powerful converter.

*** IMPORTANT - WHEN SELECTING A CONVERTER WE SUGGEST THAT YOU BUY ONE WITH 3 TIMES THE WATTAGE OF THE PRODUCT YOU ARE CONVERTING ***
 

Edited by bkb1
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Woolf
Enuff

I just looked at a SEVENSTAR TC 3000 110/220V AC-3000 Watt Transformer

 

3000 WATT Up/Down transformer converts 220-240 volts down Step to 110-120 Volts or 110-120 volts up to 220-240 volts. 3000 WATTS

  • Four input voltages selectable: 110V/200V/220V/240V
  • All range fuse protection with two spare fuses included
  • Safety break switch to power on and protect from electric shock •Two outlets for output in the front
  • ce certified

$71.38 delivered from Amazon (delivered to USA address only!)

 

But my question: This will power just about anything (small appliance)?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Woolf

Yes

 

My circuit breakers here in my house are 10 amp

240 volt 10 amp = 2400 watt

 

I connect almost anything without a problem

 

Like small chain saw, handheld rotating saw, 1500 watt vacuum cleaner, etc  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mikala

Transformers are robust creatures and routinely will handle brief over-current conditions. I'd go with the 500 watt model if I was strapped for cash.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Transformers are robust creatures and routinely will handle brief over-current conditions. I'd go with the 500 watt model if I was strapped for cash.

 

Depending on the manufacturer, this is true. But, for electrical safety, and to have ample power available for the appliance, I would go with bkb1's suggestion.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

I bought one that was too small and after installing a few new fuses  went and bought a larger one .

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDat

I found this by GOOGLE it (Panther PT 2000 step down transformer) many are for sale all over PI.

I have this model that I just stopped using, I gave P2700 12 years ago. life time repair.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..