Jump to content

Recommended Posts

cebubird

Can someone tell me where this phrase came from?

Have NEVER heard it used before and now it seems to be a very trendy phrase with everyone when referring to families of fallen vets.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 38
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • lamoe

    8

  • sugbu777

    5

  • Sonny

    5

  • cebubird

    3

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Son, it's time you quit arguing with me and listen to the wisdom of experience.    

During WWll, they were one of the most visible manifestations of the war effort.  Every household that had a man in the service displayed a small flag hung with gold cord in a window facing the street

My great-grandmother had a gold star banner hanging in her house window from WWI. Her son was killed and is buried in France. Some time in the early 1930's there was a ship (SS Republic) destined to F

cebubird

So it 'maybe' originated in/after WWI, still wonder why never heard it before and all of a sudden, it's on lips of people on every channel you turn on.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
colemanlee

So it 'maybe' originated in/after WWI, still wonder why never heard it before and all of a sudden, it's on lips of people on every channel you turn on.

Cant answer that but right after 9/11 I would see blue star and a few gold stars on the doors around DC, Va, and NC...Would drive over to Bragg to see my son, lots more gold stars....

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Sonny

So it 'maybe' originated in/after WWI, still wonder why never heard it before and all of a sudden, it's on lips of people on every channel you turn on.

 

 

During WWll, they were one of the most visible manifestations of the war effort.  Every household that had a man in the service displayed a small flag hung with gold cord in a window facing the street.  The ones with a blue star (or stars) meant their men were alive.  A gold star meant unfortunately, theirs had died in service .  I still remember the names of the families who had gold stars in our neighborhood after all these years.  I remember being with my playmate when his older brother came to fetch him and inform him his dad had been killed on Iwo Jima.  Soon, they too had their own gold star.   Mom kept dad's little flag and I would see it now and then when we were looking at old photos.  Don't know what happened to it after she died.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
cvgtpc1

So it 'maybe' originated in/after WWI, still wonder why never heard it before and all of a sudden, it's on lips of people on every channel you turn on.

Same here, just heard of it too but Google made it sound like everyone should know what it was its so common....

 

Sent from my TF700T using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator
Salty Dog

During WWll, they were one of the most visible manifestations of the war effort.  Every household that had a man in the service displayed a small flag hung with gold cord in a window facing the street.  The ones with a blue star (or stars) meant their men were alive.  A gold star meant unfortunately, theirs had died in service .  I still remember the names of the families who had gold stars in our neighborhood after all these years.  I remember being with my playmate when his older brother came to fetch him and inform him his dad had been killed on Iwo Jima.  Soon, they too had their own gold star.   Mom kept dad's little flag and I would see it now and then when we were looking at old photos.  Don't know what happened to it after she died.

 

Damn Sonny. You've been around awhile... :lol:

 

My father was only 13 in 1945 during the battle of Iwo Jima...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
lamoe

Mom had two in her window at one time. 1967

 

I still see them occasionally in my area 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sonny

Damn Sonny. You've been around awhile... :lol:

 

My father was only 13 in 1945 during the battle of Iwo Jima...

 

 

Son, it's time you quit arguing with me and listen to the wisdom of experience.     :D

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

My great-grandmother had a gold star banner hanging in her house window from WWI. Her son was killed and is buried in France. Some time in the early 1930's there was a ship (SS Republic) destined to France with the passengers all being gold star mothers of which my great-grandmother was one. I have all of the memorabilia from that trip including the pictures of the ship, a group picture of the mothers and a picture of my great grandmother at her son's gravesite.

 

The bases here on Guam have special parking for Gold Star family members at the exchange and commissary.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
cebubird

Actually saw a special little box in our local rag today explaining what it was about.

My thinking is it only became a big thing this week because of a certain muslim at a certain location/event that the msm wanted to promote.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

^^^

 

Nope. Most families with a history of military service know of the Gold Star designation and what it means. It's been around for a long time. Civilians, on the other hand with no prior military service or background usually are not familiar with it.

Edited by sugbu777
Link to post
Share on other sites
Sonny
Civilians, on the other hand with no prior military service or background usually are not familiar with it. [/quote

 

During WWll, everyone was familiar with it.   It became ingrained in our culture.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
lamoe

^^^

 

Nope. Most families with a history of military service know of the Gold Star designation and what it means. It's been around for a long time. Civilians, on the other hand with no prior military service or background usually are not familiar with it.

 

In the 60's and early 70's  Blue and gold star flags were very common and everyone knew why they repersented

 

Correction: mom had two Blue Star flags at same time not Gold - brother and I

Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

As an Englishman, I'd also never heard the phrase before.  This must be a US custom, since I am not aware of such a thing in the UK.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...