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Pickled beets


RogerDat

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ricardo123#

Not such a stupid question seeing as I was thinking of asking the same.  To me 'sugar beet' is white, woody and either fed to cattle or used for sugar production. "Beetroot" is related but has a purple colour, smaller and is great when it's pickled or, when small, boiled, skinned and served with herring or mackerel.

I was thinking the same but did not know how to answer. Sugar beets I have always seen in the states were white and basically uneatable.. fed to cows and pigs to fatten them up.

The beets here called sugar beets

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Well we had the beets for lunch today. They were thicker than the caned ones, and more crispy, taste as good as I can remember from 13 years ago. They are refrigerated after prep, so no need to have c

Greetings! I noted sugar beets in Casinos of late, was wondering who was fixings these and how. Went to Radessons, and they had them cooked on the menu, tasted like dirt, which is normal, so I bought

my grandmother pickled beets and sweet pickles forever. every meal featured the 2 jars on table. I never enjoyed them as a child.   today I would kill to put homemade pickled beets and sweet pickle

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Scotsbloke

I was thinking the same but did not know how to answer. Sugar beets I have always seen in the states were white and basically uneatable.. fed to cows and pigs to fatten them up.

The beets here called sugar beets

So can we agree on the following:

 

Sugar beet: White and woody and fed to coos.

Beetroot: Delightful, purple tubers with gorgeous foliage.  Great when boiled and lovely when pickled.

Beets: A word used by Americans that could describe anything due to their paucity of language ;)

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RogerDat

At least we know a faggot is something that sucks, not something that  gets sucked.

,

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RogerDat

Yes that's the one I pickled. GOOGLE sugar beets and 99% returns are white in pictures, Do the same but add red, and results are about 90% red. Beat root is same, mostly red. I never saw a sugar beet (white) in Carolina,turnips are sweet also, love those.

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ricardo123#

Yes that's the one I pickled. GOOGLE sugar beets and 99% returns are white in pictures, Do the same but add red, and results are about 90% red. Beat root is same, mostly red. I never saw a sugar beet (white) in Carolina,turnips are sweet also, love those.

never had a pickled turnip.. raw with salt or cooked with butter... mashed or chunked.. love them... if you try pickling them let us know.. I like the greens from those too... beet greens were a treat when I was a kid
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RogerDat

My bad, not pickled turnip, used to dig them up on my great uncles farm and skin and eat them raw.

Next Monday is the test day for the pickles, if OK I will post recipe.

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Sugar beet: White and woody and fed to coos. Beetroot: Delightful, purple tubers with gorgeous foliage. Great when boiled and lovely when pickled. Beets: A word used by Americans that could describe anything due to their paucity of language

 

In the US we draw a distinction between sugar beet and beets, the latter being the 'delightful tuber with gorgeous foliage' that some call beetroots.  Since both sugar beets and what we designate 'beet's are roots, beetroot could mean either type..   

Too, sugar beets are not fed to cows (or coos), rather they are grown  commercially  to produce sugar eliminating the need for cane sugar.

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RogerDat

Well we had the beets for lunch today. They were thicker than the caned ones, and more crispy, taste as good as I can remember from 13 years ago. They are refrigerated after prep, so no need to have caning equipment and jars.

 

from GOOGLE

 

3 pounds fresh small whole beets (use similar size beets)*
2 cups apple cider vinegar ( wife used white vinegar)
2 cups water
2 cups granulated sugar
3 or 4 garlic cloves, sliced in half
Wash, rinse and drain until all traces of garden soil are removed.
Use a small vegetable brush if needed.
Place beets in large heavy pan and cover with water over medium-high heat.
 Bring just to a boil; reduce heat to medium, cover and cook until fork tender,
approximately 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from heat and drain.
Let beets cool until you can safely handle them.
Once cool enough to hand, peel the skin off. They should peel easily by hand,
but you can use a paring knife if you want. (However, it's wise to use a paper
towel or wear gloves to keep the beet juice from staining your hands.)

In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, add apple cider vinegar, water,
 sugar, and garlic cloves; bring to a boil, stirring until sugar melts.
Reduce heat and let the pickling brine simmer approximately 5 minutes.
Remove from heat and let brine cool before adding the cooked beets.
How to pickle beets:
Place sliced or whole cooked beet into a large jar that will fit in your refrigerator.
NOTE: I personally like to slice the beets.
 Pour cooled Pickling Brine over the beets and gently stir. Place, covered, in the
refrigerator.
Let them sit in the refrigerator, maybe stirring once in a while, at least a week
before eating them. Give the beets a chance to “pickle” and develop flavor
 before eating. These beets will last a long time in the refrigerator,
probably 2 to 3 months.
 

Edited by RogerDat
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wondersailor

Along those lines, are canning supplies available in the Philippines ? Would rather not ship over a mess of jars if I can get them there.

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,

 

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sugbu777

Pickled beets with onions. Love 'em.  All of the Pinoy relatives hate them. they also hate "Spanish" olives. My wife's cousin put an olive in her mouth to try and damn near puked! I got a kick out of that. She can eat blood, innards, unripe fruit and bagoong, but not an olive :D

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guardsman
30 minutes ago, sugbu777 said:

Pickled beets with onions. Love 'em.  All of the Pinoy relatives hate them. they also hate "Spanish" olives. My wife's cousin put an olive in her mouth to try and damn near puked! I got a kick out of that. She can eat blood, innards, unripe fruit and bagoong, but not an olive :D

How about oysters and a glass of Guinness?  Food of the gods for me but too 'salty' for my ex.

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NOSOCALPINOY
21 minutes ago, guardsman said:

How about oysters and a glass of Guinness?  Food of the gods for me but too 'salty' for my ex.

A friend of mine ate a dozen raw oysters on the half shell at a fancy restaurant in Manila. About an hour later she was in the emergency room having her stomach pumped out for redtide raw oyster poisoning.

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shadow
1 hour ago, wondersailor said:

Along those lines, are canning supplies available in the Philippines ? Would rather not ship over a mess of jars if I can get them there.

 

Yes, check Lazada

25 minutes ago, NOSOCALPINOY said:

A friend of mine ate a dozen raw oysters on the half shell at a fancy restaurant in Manila. About an hour later she was in the emergency room having her stomach pumped out for redtide raw oyster poisoning.

A tip for life preservation, don't eat raw oysters in the Philippines. They know nothing of Red Tide.

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