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English the Filipino way

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MANILA, Philippines

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Paul
Interesting story. But what the author seems to have forgotten is that all English speaking countries DO NOT all speak the same. As an Aussie i certainly don't speak the same as Americans or the English. Each country has its own slang or even dialect of the English language. There a quite a few words that are spelt the same but have totally different meanings depending on which country your in. In the Philippines its no different

 

Agreed. I have been in a number of English speaking countries (as their primary language), with many differences from my own, in fact. (I'm a US citizen, having been born there.) I couldn't tell you how many different "versions", slang or dialects there are, only in the US!

 

But, even with the Aussie and Kiwi influences I had while in each country, I still try not to spell too many words with a "y" (tyre), or to put my "r's" before my "e's" (theatre). :D B)

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mr_whippy

The Philippines lost its place as the country with the best standard of English speaking in South East Asia to Singapore some time ago. The overall standard of English speaking and especially writing is much better there as their educational facilities are among the best in the world, they don't have primary school class sizes of 50+, and they don't think it amusing to see schoolchildren hanging out of the windows when they are supposed to be there to learn. Some of the people teaching English in the Philippines can hardly string a sentence together.

 

however I do admit I find Pinglish just as charming as Singlish and Tinglish and it would never occur to me to pour scorn on the way it is spoken here.

 

You outsource that to someone from India, or Singapore, or Hong Kong, and their accents will not be as pleasing to those customer

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The Mason
7. Remind those arrogant enough to challenge our English that on many terms, we win because we have the numbers. The United Kingdom herself only has about 60 million people, and even those guys can

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Bob Ward
They also have a higher level of all round general education which serves to complement their English skills, and gives them an extra edge in the call centre business.

 

Yes on the education, but no on the rest! Many big US companies including Dell, HP and Compaq had to bail out of call centers in India and relocate them to Dublin, the Philippines and other places. The Indians were disorganized, had terrible accents and generally did a poor job. I know this first hand. not from the news!

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mr_whippy

that's America though. Don't forget the PI was an American colony, whereas India was a British one.

 

Philippines accents are far less easy on the British ear than an Indian one, especially as there are so many people of Indian-Pakistani descent in the UK these days.

 

what Americans like best is of course British - and Irish - accents. They're a total sucker for them.

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sork
Yes on the education, but no on the rest! Many big US companies including Dell, HP and Compaq had to bail out of call centers in India and relocate them to Dublin, the Philippines and other places. The Indians were disorganized, had terrible accents and generally did a poor job. I know this first hand. not from the news!

 

Filipino culture is more acquainted with US culture, making the Philippines better equipped than India to handle calls from kanos.

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Resident
Filipino culture is more acquainted with US culture, making the Philippines better equipped than India to handle calls from kanos.

 

Agent: Good afternoon sir, welcome to xxx bank, how can I help you?

Customer: Where are you located?

Agent: In the Philippines.

Custumer: I dont want to talk to you, let me talk to your supervisor.

Agent: Just one moment sir.

Supervisor: How can I help you today?

Custumer: I want to talk to someone in the US, you are stealing our jobs.

Supervisor: Just hang on while I connect you.

 

Agent(US): What seems to be the problem?

Customer: You dont sound American, where are you from?

Agent: I am Jamaican, based in Florida.

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Markham
Philippines accents are far less easy on the British ear than an Indian one

Speak for yourself! Really, where do you dig-up this twaddle?

 

 

Mark

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Bob Ward
Speak for yourself! Really, where do you dig-up this twaddle?

 

 

Mark

 

If I'm going to be accepted into the British realm, I'm going to have to suss the twaddle and sort the bollocks from reality!

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twostrokes

Back to the original post, dealing with the writers idea that the PI should embrace and improve their english... To that I agree. Much of the destruction of the countries ability to speak english falls directly on the government's shoulders. I can remember back in the 60's, if you were cought speaking anything but english on the school grounds, you were fined 10 Centovos (which would buy a coke back then). I would say 90 % of the population around any city was very fluent in english. I had no problems speak and understanding everyone I came into contact with. That is except when we took our bike rides into the middle of nowhere and came upon smal villages. But even there, enough people stepped forward, who could speak good english, to make our stay easy. Then in the mid 70's that "english on school grounds was dropped. Then by the mid 80's, If you spoke English, you were not a good fiipino. The "nationalist" push became strongerl and stronger. School books were even rewritten to make everything the US did in the philippines to be something bad, or something against the philippines. This type thinking has been used to keep the rich educated and the others much less educated. Notice the Rich never quit speaking English. Notice the top schools didn't stop teaching in English. Notice a good command of the english language never went away as a necessity to even get into a good school. It was just another way to keep the slaves, slaves to the rich.

 

The point of the article as I see is, is that admittedly English is the International language. For Filipinos to have a chance in this game, they must become and stay proficient in the English language period. Now I don't care if it is English, American English, Nigerian English, Indian English, or Filipino English. But the point is, they had a large edge up until the 60's, From there on, they slowly began to lose it. And worse yet, were tought that it was ok to loose it as it was NOT their Language, so why speak it. It was the language of that mean old country, USA, who used and abused them for so many years. That song is getting old. Every country has a history, some of it they like, some of it they don't but that doesn't change it. Maybe the US did some exploiting in the PI, but they also did a lot of good things for the country at the same time. Most of the things now blamed on the US, were actually things the wealthy Filipino families did to the Filipinos that the US just did nothing to stop. So maybe guilty by association only at best.

 

With all that said, why shoot yourself in the foot concern the English Language. It has world power,, and nothing really to do with the US.

Jim

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mr_whippy

Filipino culture is more acquainted with US culture, making the Philippines better equipped than India to handle calls from kanos.

 

of course it is, but India is basically a nation of over 1 billion tea-drinking Anglophiles - albeit with a similarly ambivalent attitude to the UK colonial period as touched upon by twostrokes above in the US experience in the Philippines. Sherlock Holmes and PG Wodehouse novels are still best selling books and tv shows like 'Yes Minister' - which just about all Filipinos and also a hell of a lot of Americans would find more or less unintelligible, are massively popular. The converse is true for them. Of course they're better able to connect with UK people than Filipinos generally would be.

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tom_shor
Agent: Good afternoon sir, welcome to xxx bank, how can I help you?

Customer: Where are you located?

Agent: In the Philippines.

Custumer: I dont want to talk to you, let me talk to your supervisor.

Agent: Just one moment sir.

Supervisor: How can I help you today?

Custumer: I want to talk to someone in the US, you are stealing our jobs.

Supervisor: Just hang on while I connect you.

 

Agent(US): What seems to be the problem?

Customer: You dont sound American, where are you from?

Agent: I am Jamaican, based in Florida.

 

 

:D:D:D:D B)

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tom_shor

Filipino English is most certainly a dialect of english (like American :D ). It would be benificial to improve the teaching of English in the public schools. To most of the people in the Philippines English isn't any more of a foreign language than Tagalog.

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Dans
Filipino English is most certainly a dialect of english (like American B) ). It would be benificial to improve the teaching of English in the public schools. To most of the people in the Philippines English isn't any more of a foreign language than Tagalog.

 

filipino english is the "bastardized english" of the world. i am a filipino and i can attest to that! LOL!

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