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julio from spain

Learning Spanish Yes? No? Why?

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julio from spain
Ohhhh, i'll have to check that site. I've been studying Spanish for years. Have been interested mainly in how the Spanish words in Tagalog evolved.

 

 

 

There are many words that have diffrent meanings now. Syempre means of course. Andar only means a machine running.

I think for recoger, we just say kuha.

The stress on some words are different, like libro.

 

 

 

The names sound Spanish but they have very different meanings :D We even have a dessert called pastillas de leche.

 

Studying Spanish is easier for us but we use Latin American Spanish. Reading is also a lot easier for me compared to my German classmates. They mispronounce the 'ui' or 'ue' and they read slowly. I go to my Spanish class every Wednesday night at the adult school (VHS).

 

Thankyou for the page. If you visit http://www.geocites.com/Kaibigankastil/ check the part "hispanismos en el tagalog". Very interesting.

In more than hundred years the actual spanish has changed and some words are not so used or used anymore, but here (cebuano, tagalog..) remained as it was, and expressions like "siempre" could be the way of saying of course in that time, not so different meaning... Kwarto/ cuarto means not only fourth in spanish, but bedroom or just room.

But cuartos mean also dinero, like a quarter dollar. Pastilla de leche could mean in that time "Pasta de leche" any kind of milk food. But may be in M

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julio from spain
Julio, go to Zamboanga City. It's Asia's Latin City. Most people can speak Chavacano, which know means dirty Spanish. Classic Chavacano is about 90% Spanish, but it's slowly dying and being pollluted by Visayan and Tagalog.

 

 

I know chavacano is dying, like died spanish 50 yrs ago, when philipinas was the Asia,s Latin Country.

But Chavacano dosn

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julio from spain
A documentary aired on Cebu City's Sky Cable TV this past week found that at least 30% of that country do speak and READ Portuguese language.

 

somehow I doubt that. The East Timor literacy rate is the lowest in Asia, less than 60%.

 

I did hear that some families with Portuguese background spoke it at home but not out in public

 

same goes in the Philippines, and South Africa for that matter now that there's probably only about 5 Portuguese families left in Angola and Mozambique, but fact is try speaking Portuguese on the street in any of its former colonies and you'll get next to nowhere.

 

I don

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sork
I think that having 15% of vocabulary from spanish is quite an influence, at least under my opinion. And of course they are pronounced and speled different. We are not talking about spanish..we are talking about native lenguages. Can we say the same of aborigin languages in Australia, India or Africa? In other hand we have the criolle or chavacano, a mother language for about 200.000 people now, many more in previous generations. But of course i don,t think i wouldn

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Tatoosh

As I mentioned in a separate thread, I am reading a book that talks about the Hispanization of the Philippines. It was published in the nineteen sixties, but much of the insight is quite valid and it occasionally compares Spanish institutions here with similar ones (or dissimilar ones) in Mexico. The direct domination of Spain lasted for hundreds of years. However it was only in the last decade or so that Spain tried to make Spanish a commonly spoken language in the Philippines. Before that it was spoken by the Spanish including the administrators and colonizers, the churchmen, and the elite families that acted as intermediaries between the people and the government.

 

Spanish would have been commonly spoken in Manila and perhaps in parts of Cebu City, but other than that, not much until the 1870's or so. American occupation completely changed that attitude, providing schools and requiring English for the Filipinos that wanted positions in the new government. The primary obstacle to education in the provinces was the Friars and they were ousted by the Americans in pretty quick order. There were a fair amount of loan words from Spanish as their are from the Americn English, but Spain's influence, particularly through the Catholic Church (which answered to Spain, not Rome) here was a much greater influence than the fifty years of direct American domination.

 

I am still learning about the history of the Philippines and this is what I've gleaned from reading so far. My views are subject to change as I explore other authors and encounter new ideas. But the bottom line is that Spain is the major influence, America is a more recent influence that continued even after Philippine's independence due to America's influence on the world. But it has not "cleansed" the Philippines of their Spanish influenced culture.

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julio from spain
I know basic Spanish.

 

Do you think spanish language is part of your own mother language?

Some words are derived from Spanish.... so what !

 

Some? curious sense of cuantity

 

Do you have any Hispanic heritage in your way of being, thinking or behaving?

Not really. We don't really have a formal siesta time. We don't drink Sangria

 

funny to reduce culture to siesta and sangria..anyway try sangr

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julio from spain
Don't get uptight if their spelling of the word is completely different than the Spanish spelling. And maybe the meaning too. Lechon means barbeque here, not pig. If you want barbecued pig, you ask for Lechon Baboy, if you want barbecued chicken, it is Lechon Manok. Variations of spelling for both Spanish and English (American) words happen often along with the different usage.

 

Attitudes toward Spain due to Spain's occupation vary from "When was that?" to "Wonderful times". Most of the people will be former, the Catholic church will be the latter. Mexico's connection to the Philippines ended in 1815 when they ousted Spain. The Philippines continued for another 70 plus years to be dominated by Spain, excuting folks for seeking recognition as a political entity or simply questioning Spanish methods. This included killing some priests surprisingly. Spain never controlled much of Mindanao and the Cordillera of Luzon remained pretty free of Spanish and Catholic influence. Of course, compared to their history in the Americas, Spain was pretty benign here.

 

Maybe worth reading some history of the country if you are interested in marrying someone from here. However, history is not a particularly popular subject with most Filipinos, nor is geography. Even college graduates here have a pretty hard time with just where most countries are. And India is part of Indonesia to many. Portugal is part of Spain or maybe the other way around, depending on who you ask.

 

While there is talk of adding Spanish as a regular language in the schools, it is more likely they will add Chinese of some sort, since they are interested in working abroad where there is money. If the money is going to China (or Hong Kong or where ever) that is where they want to be.

 

Unfortunatelly I think you

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julio from spain
If you want Spanish come to most any state in the USA....Spanish is rapidly becoming the 1st language of the USA...As more and more Spanish speaking people choose to jump our fences, dig tunnels, hide in trucks and any other way they can invade our country, English is being lost. And since every few years some political group wants the votes, they decide to give amesty to these illegals and let them become citizens so they can vote for the yahoo.... Want Spanish influence, or influence from Mexico.....Come to Texas or Southern Calif....Most there don't accept that it is not still part of Mexico.

 

In the Philippines, there is probably a lot more Spanish influence still floating around the areas of Cavite. The locals there seemed to adapt and adopt to Spanish ways and language quicker and more rapidly than anywhere else. Try Cavite City...they still speak Chavacano which is a large mixture of Spanish. It is fading away, but was still very strong in the 60's.

Jim

 

Politics are politics always, once they dicided to make the war to Mexico and take most of their territory for interest and now to let mexicans to be citicens in that land because of their interest too. But don

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julio from spain
Julio:

 

I've been compiling Spanish-origin words that are found in Cebuano:

 

http://ceb.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talaan_sa_mg...an_sa_Kinatsila

 

You might want to check that list. There are many other words I haven't added.

 

Some of them are different. For example, kwarta (cuarta) means money. Pirmi (firme) means always.

 

As for Spanish language, there is definitely some. I have met a few people who speak decent Spanish and most know a few words. I have heard that in Zamboanga City you can get by on Spanish alone.

 

As for Spanish heritage, there is a little, but not as much as Latin America.

 

As for Spanish culture, there is definitely some. For example the fiestas (piyestas) are more Spanish/Mexican than Asian or American. The system of sobornos is more Latin/Spanish than Asian/American. Time is more like Spain/Latin America.

 

Food is not really affected by Spanish culture.

 

I've lived in Spain, Venezuela, Mexico and Philippines to give you an idea of my point of view. There is definitely a Latin American/Spanish mentality, but it is mixed with Asian influences and American (USA) influences.

 

Thank you Sork, the page is very interesting. Actually there is a big similitude between the spanish vocabulary in cebuano and tagalo.

I don,t think we should distinguish very much between spanish and mexican heritage. Though the social culture is more similar to latinamerican countries, the heritage is always the same, here and there.

About the sistem of sobornos, is very extended in Am

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GoneAsiatic
But don
Edited by GoneAsiatic

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sork
Thank you Sork, the page is very interesting. Actually there is a big similitude between the spanish vocabulary in cebuano and tagalo.

I don,t think we should distinguish very much between spanish and mexican heritage. Though the social culture is more similar to latinamerican countries, the heritage is always the same, here and there.

About the sistem of sobornos, is very extended in Am

Edited by sork

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julio from spain
Obviously you have little or no knowledge of the Hispanic situation in America. Whole generations sometimes live their entire lives without speaking English. Yes, their kids learn it in school, often after a few years of bilingual education, and even that is not usually Standard English, but a metamorphosis of the two languages.

 

For a little insight, try watching the movie Spanglish. It was made in Hollywood. You know, the place that brought all those pit bulls and high fences to the Philippines.

 

When I say three generations I say three generations. Do you think that a kid now 15 yrs old, that his grand father emigrated to the States in the 60

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