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julio from spain

Learning Spanish Yes? No? Why?

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sork

Julio:

 

I've been compiling Spanish-origin words that are found in Cebuano:

 

http://ceb.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talaan_sa_mg...an_sa_Kinatsila

 

You might want to check that list. There are many other words I haven't added.

 

Some of them are different. For example, kwarta (cuarta) means money. Pirmi (firme) means always.

 

As for Spanish language, there is definitely some. I have met a few people who speak decent Spanish and most know a few words. I have heard that in Zamboanga City you can get by on Spanish alone.

 

As for Spanish heritage, there is a little, but not as much as Latin America.

 

As for Spanish culture, there is definitely some. For example the fiestas (piyestas) are more Spanish/Mexican than Asian or American. The system of sobornos is more Latin/Spanish than Asian/American. Time is more like Spain/Latin America.

 

Food is not really affected by Spanish culture.

 

I've lived in Spain, Venezuela, Mexico and Philippines to give you an idea of my point of view. There is definitely a Latin American/Spanish mentality, but it is mixed with Asian influences and American (USA) influences.

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Tatoosh

Okay, what is "sobornos"?

 

I am reading a book on the "Hispanization of the Philippines" by John Phelan, published in 1959. It has some interesting points on how Spanish influence was limited or changed by the locals, both in social and religious aspects.

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sork
Okay, what is "sobornos"?

 

I am reading a book on the "Hispanization of the Philippines" by John Phelan, published in 1959. It has some interesting points on how Spanish influence was limited or changed by the locals, both in social and religious aspects.

 

Soborno is the Cebuano word for bribe... the word is the same in Spanish... which leads me to believe the system of bribery comes from the Spanish influence. It's a similar system as in other Spanish-speaking countries but not usually found in English-speaking countries, at least not in the same way. Many petty government process require sobornos. But in the US/Canada/UK they don't require a "bribe".

Edited by sork

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aka
Thanks for the update L & A. I can't vouch for the accuracy of the TV documentary,

but I think they meant to point out that 30% of the country could read and speak

Portuguese -- just as Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd can speak Chinese --

but NOT use it as an everyday "lingua franca" in daily speech.

:P

 

 

Yes i think your right. I did hear that some family's with Portuguese background spoke it at home but not out in public

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KeithAngel
Soborno is the Cebuano word for bribe... the word is the same in Spanish... which leads me to believe the system of bribery comes from the Spanish influence. It's a similar system as in other Spanish-speaking countries but not usually found in English-speaking countries, at least not in the same way. Many petty government process require sobornos. But in the US/Canada/UK they don't require a "bribe".

 

From the LATIN subornare same root as suborn in English

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mr_whippy

A documentary aired on Cebu City's Sky Cable TV this past week found that at least 30% of that country do speak and READ Portuguese language.

 

somehow I doubt that. The East Timor literacy rate is the lowest in Asia, less than 60%.

 

I did hear that some families with Portuguese background spoke it at home but not out in public

 

same goes in the Philippines, and South Africa for that matter now that there's probably only about 5 Portuguese families left in Angola and Mozambique, but fact is try speaking Portuguese on the street in any of its former colonies and you'll get next to nowhere.

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Ces
Julio:

 

I've been compiling Spanish-origin words that are found in Cebuano:

 

http://ceb.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talaan_sa_mg...an_sa_Kinatsila

 

You might want to check that list. There are many other words I haven't added.

 

Ohhhh, i'll have to check that site. I've been studying Spanish for years. Have been interested mainly in how the Spanish words in Tagalog evolved.

 

Some of them are different. For example, kwarta (cuarta) means money. Pirmi (firme) means always.

 

There are many words that have diffrent meanings now. Syempre means of course. Andar only means a machine running.

I think for recoger, we just say kuha.

The stress on some words are different, like libro.

 

Food is not really affected by Spanish culture.

 

The names sound Spanish but they have very different meanings :D We even have a dessert called pastillas de leche.

 

Studying Spanish is easier for us but we use Latin American Spanish. Reading is also a lot easier for me compared to my German classmates. They mispronounce the 'ui' or 'ue' and they read slowly. I go to my Spanish class every Wednesday night at the adult school (VHS).

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Bob Ward

And over the years people here have morphed Spanish words into their own pronunciations. The best example I can think of is Spanish for the number 7. Siete is pronounced shit-ty! There are many other examples!

Edited by Bob Ward

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mr_whippy

fact is try speaking Portuguese on the street in any of its former colonies and you'll get next to nowhere.

 

um, I'd better correct myself there. You could probably manage OK in Brazil.

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Paul
I would like to have the opinion of you filipinos, as many as possible, about the convenience of learning spanish.

But before answering i want you think about this other questions:

 

Do you think spanish language is part of your own mother language?

Do you have any Hispanic heritage in your way of being, thinking or behaving?

Do you feel closer to China, Japan or Malasya than Mexico?

Are your music, dances, literature... Asian? Nothamerican?

Should be cultural development mainly aimed to economical interests?

Do you really know about your history? Different sources?

 

First, I haven't bothered reading any other posts, prior to making this one.

 

Second, I am an American by birth, not a Filipino. But, I have focused, quite a bit, on learning Cebuano since moving here years ago.

 

Third, the only Spanish I have learned in my life, is from the Spanish influence in words, counting money (Cebuano is used to count objects) and in learning time (ala una, alas dos, etc.). I know, and it has probably been stated here already, that many of the words used may be similar to Spanish, but are of a different spelling. Spanish is not as much of an influence as one may think, though, in their language. What I mean here is, you can be fluent in Spanish but still not be able to communicate here, upon arriving. So, your best bet is to use English, unless you wish to learn Cebuano (or Tagalog) after arriving.

 

Last, I would suggest for you to make a trip to Cebu and learn about them directly. There is nothing better than being here.

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sork
And over the years people here have morphed Spanish words into their own pronunciations. The best example I can think of is Spanish for the number 7. Siete is pronounced shit-ty! There are many other examples!

 

Yes.

 

If you pronounce the number "10" in the Spanish way: "dee-eis" people will not understand you. Here it's prononounced "jayce".

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Bob Ward
Yes.

 

If you pronounce the number "10" in the Spanish way: "dee-eis" people will not understand you. Here it's prononounced "jayce".

 

Mark, I'm with you brother! The cebuano spelling is diyes and it's pronounced a little differently than your phonetic spelling. It's more like "gees" ie long e versus long a, but as you know the a here is pronounced much like an e in English. I ride the jeepneys every day and I use it all the time! Just trying to help a brother out!

Edited by Bob Ward

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julio from spain
nobody speaks Spanish in the Philippines except a tiny minority of the mega rich who wouldn't give time of day to some Spanish sex or to euphemise it slightly, a 'marriage' tourist. If you were related to somebody in the Spanish royal family, then maybe they might be interested in getting to know you - otherwise forget it.

 

you get French people dreaming that people speak French in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam as well, but guess what nobody does. Nobody speaks Dutch in Indonesia, and nobody speaks Portuguese in East Timor or Macau either.

 

As you can see, my reply to you was directed by mistake to BOB. If you check, you will find it.

It is a text with six points. You can ignore the first line and the last point, just misunderstanding

I apologize to Bob again. Julio

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julio from spain
First, I haven't bothered reading any other posts, prior to making this one.

 

Second, I am an American by birth, not a Filipino. But, I have focused, quite a bit, on learning Cebuano since moving here years ago.

 

Third, the only Spanish I have learned in my life, is from the Spanish influence in words, counting money (Cebuano is used to count objects) and in learning time (ala una, alas dos, etc.). I know, and it has probably been stated here already, that many of the words used may be similar to Spanish, but are of a different spelling. Spanish is not as much of an influence as one may think, though, in their language. What I mean here is, you can be fluent in Spanish but still not be able to communicate here, upon arriving. So, your best bet is to use English, unless you wish to learn Cebuano (or Tagalog) after arriving.

 

Last, I would suggest for you to make a trip to Cebu and learn about them directly. There is nothing better than being here.

 

I think that having 15% of vocabulary from spanish is quite an influence, at least under my opinion. And of course they are pronounced and speled different. We are not talking about spanish..we are talking about native lenguages. Can we say the same of aborigin languages in Australia, India or Africa? In other hand we have the criolle or chavacano, a mother language for about 200.000 people now, many more in previous generations. But of course i don,t think i wouldn

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Penguin

Julio, go to Zamboanga City. It's Asia's Latin City. Most people can speak Chavacano, which know means dirty Spanish. Classic Chavacano is about 90% Spanish, but it's slowly dying and being pollluted by Visayan and Tagalog.

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