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julio from spain

Learning Spanish Yes? No? Why?

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julio from spain

I would like to have the opinion of you filipinos, as many as possible, about the convenience of learning spanish.

But before answering i want you think about this other questions:

 

Do you think spanish language is part of your own mother language?

Do you have any Hispanic heritage in your way of being, thinking or behaving?

Do you feel closer to China, Japan or Malasya than Mexico?

Are your music, dances, literature... Asian? Nothamerican?

Should be cultural development mainly aimed to economical interests?

Do you really know about your history? Different sources?

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ckfm
I would like to have the opinion of you filipinos, as many as possible, about the convenience of learning spanish.

But before answering i want you think about this other questions:

 

Do you think spanish language is part of your own mother language?

Do you have any Hispanic heritage in your way of being, thinking or behaving?

Do you feel closer to China, Japan or Malasya than Mexico?

Are your music, dances, literature... Asian? Nothamerican?

Should be cultural development mainly aimed to economical interests?

Do you really know about your history? Different sources?

 

 

I read in another post of yours that you intend in coming to the Philippines in order to find a nice woman.

 

My advice: Don't bother with those questions. Why would you want to stir up the [email protected]? Fact is that there are many Spanish words in the language, my wife can understand Spanish OK and wants to learn more but don't expect much love from most Filipinas for you being Spanish.

 

Keep it low and nobody will bother you for being from Spain. Speak English.

 

:wink:

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Tatoosh

Don't get uptight if their spelling of the word is completely different than the Spanish spelling. And maybe the meaning too. Lechon means barbeque here, not pig. If you want barbecued pig, you ask for Lechon Baboy, if you want barbecued chicken, it is Lechon Manok. Variations of spelling for both Spanish and English (American) words happen often along with the different usage.

 

Attitudes toward Spain due to Spain's occupation vary from "When was that?" to "Wonderful times". Most of the people will be former, the Catholic church will be the latter. Mexico's connection to the Philippines ended in 1815 when they ousted Spain. The Philippines continued for another 70 plus years to be dominated by Spain, excuting folks for seeking recognition as a political entity or simply questioning Spanish methods. This included killing some priests surprisingly. Spain never controlled much of Mindanao and the Cordillera of Luzon remained pretty free of Spanish and Catholic influence. Of course, compared to their history in the Americas, Spain was pretty benign here.

 

Maybe worth reading some history of the country if you are interested in marrying someone from here. However, history is not a particularly popular subject with most Filipinos, nor is geography. Even college graduates here have a pretty hard time with just where most countries are. And India is part of Indonesia to many. Portugal is part of Spain or maybe the other way around, depending on who you ask.

 

While there is talk of adding Spanish as a regular language in the schools, it is more likely they will add Chinese of some sort, since they are interested in working abroad where there is money. If the money is going to China (or Hong Kong or where ever) that is where they want to be.

Edited by Tatoosh

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Balay

I know basic Spanish.

 

Do you think spanish language is part of your own mother language?

Some words are derived from Spanish.... so what !

 

Do you have any Hispanic heritage in your way of being, thinking or behaving?

Not really. We don't really have a formal siesta time. We don't drink Sangria

 

Do you feel closer to China, Japan or Malasya than Mexico?

Distance we are of course to other Asian countries. Mexico has cock fighting derbies, so culturally we may be closer to Mexico., but we don't have bull fights.

 

Are your music, dances, literature... Asian? Nothamerican?

It is Bisrock. Cebu is also known as the reggae capital of Asia.

 

Should be cultural development mainly aimed to economical interests?

What do you mean ? You mean like Sinulog Festival ?

 

Do you really know about your history? Different sources?

Yes I know the Filipino history.... 400 years of Spanish influence, 50 years of Hollywood.

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mr_whippy

nobody speaks Spanish in the Philippines except a tiny minority of the mega rich who wouldn't give time of day to some Spanish sex or to euphemise it slightly, a 'marriage' tourist. If you were related to somebody in the Spanish royal family, then maybe they might be interested in getting to know you - otherwise forget it.

 

you get French people dreaming that people speak French in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam as well, but guess what nobody does. Nobody speaks Dutch in Indonesia, and nobody speaks Portuguese in East Timor or Macau either.

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twostrokes

If you want Spanish come to most any state in the USA....Spanish is rapidly becoming the 1st language of the USA...As more and more Spanish speaking people choose to jump our fences, dig tunnels, hide in trucks and any other way they can invade our country, English is being lost. And since every few years some political group wants the votes, they decide to give amesty to these illegals and let them become citizens so they can vote for the yahoo.... Want Spanish influence, or influence from Mexico.....Come to Texas or Southern Calif....Most there don't accept that it is not still part of Mexico.

 

In the Philippines, there is probably a lot more Spanish influence still floating around the areas of Cavite. The locals there seemed to adapt and adopt to Spanish ways and language quicker and more rapidly than anywhere else. Try Cavite City...they still speak Chavacano which is a large mixture of Spanish. It is fading away, but was still very strong in the 60's.

Jim

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Bet_Busta
they still speak Chavacano which is a large mixture of Spanish. It is fading away, but was still very strong in the 60's.

Jim

 

Chavacano is the dialect of Zamboanga City. It is mostly Spanish words mixed with local words.

Sometimes the Spanish word is misused as in " Da mi el comedor y tenedor", should be cuchara.

 

Up to the 70's, 2 years of Spanish was a requirement in college. It was also taught in 4th year

high school in some schools.

 

Most Filipinos has Spanish blood, hence you have family names like Gonzales, Enriquez, Garcia, etc.

The family tree of the Enriquez clan of Danao, to which my wife belong, traces back to the Spanish guy

that came from Spain and settled there.

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Resident
Chavacano is the dialect of Zamboanga City. It is mostly Spanish words mixed with local words.

Sometimes the Spanish word is misused as in " Da mi el comedor y tenedor", should be cuchara.

 

Up to the 70's, 2 years of Spanish was a requirement in college. It was also taught in 4th year

high school in some schools.

 

Most Filipinos has Spanish blood, hence you have family names like Gonzales, Enriquez, Garcia, etc.

The family tree of the Enriquez clan of Danao, to which my wife belong, traces back to the Spanish guy

that came from Spain and settled there.

 

I disagree on that one. Most Filipinos have no Spanish or Mexican ancestry, even if they often say that they do. The reason for most Filipinos having Spanish surnames is that during the time of Spanish rule they were forced to drop their Filipino name and take on a Spanish name.

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Tatoosh

I suppose some dna sampling would sort this out, but I think that there is more Spanish blood flowing through Filipino veins than most kano's want to give credence to. Spain sent two types out, the priests to convert the natives and the adminstrators to exploit them. Now the latter, stuck in a remote place with little chance of recognition from Spain would try to get as much money as possible and then enjoy themselves. My guess that enjoy themselves included quite a few doe eyed vixens from the local barangay.

 

Now the Priests, trying to reform the wicked ways of pleasant sex, helpful gods, and easy divorce found in the Philippines on their arrival. They wanted everyone to live a life of chastity and once married, no going back. However, they were not quite so hard on themselves. Assigned to distant poor churches of the province, many enjoyed the "other" fruits of their parish. Not surprising considering the widepsread population meant that priests were often assigned to such remote areas and did not see another churchman for many many months. The resistance to oversight by local Bishops for those remote priests made it quite easy for relationships to ripen without intervention. So many of the Spanish surnamed Filipinos carry some genetic donations from Europe and Nueva Espan, not all from the soldiers and adminstrators of the Spanish court.

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Bob Ward

One Scottish guy who has been here many many years and owns several businesses told me this story. He learned this from his travles and interactions with locals on various islands. I researched the information and found it to be largely true.

 

The Spanish occupied the Philippines from "New Spain" or Mexico. Although the vast majority of the ruling parties were Spanish, the majority of the actual occupiers were Mexicans.

 

The Mexicans consisted of crews from the ships, laborers, tradesmen and soldiers. So there is probably more Mexican blood in the Philippines than Spanish. I see many more Filipinos whose facial features favor Mexican decent rather than Spanish. This would also contribute to the number of Spanish surnames here.

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Resident
One Scottish guy who has been here many many years and owns several businesses told me this story. He learned this from his travles and interactions with locals on various islands. I researched the information and found it to be largely true.

 

The Spanish occupied the Philippines from "New Spain" or Mexico. Although the vast majority of the ruling parties were Spanish, the majority of the actual occupiers were Mexicans.

 

The Mexicans consisted of crews from the ships, laborers, tradesmen and soldiers. So there is probably more Mexican blood in the Philippines than Spanish. I see many more Filipinos whose facial features favor Mexican decent rather than Spanish. This would also contribute to the number of Spanish surnames here.

 

quote from the book "History of the Filipino People" written by Teodoro A. Agoncillo:

"Probably one of the indelible marks left by the Spanish conquest on the Filipinos was the adoption of Hispanic names, as decreed by Governor Narciso Claveria in 1849. Filipinos were obligated to adopt surnames like Rizal, Del Pilar and Luna although some indigenous surnames like Mabini and Panganiban were retained. Not only were Filipinos given family names as bases for census and statistics, but the surnames also guaranteed exact tax collection, regular performance of polos y servicios personales, and control of population movement."

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Bob Ward
quote from the book "History of the Filipino People" written by Teodoro A. Agoncillo:

"Probably one of the indelible marks left by the Spanish conquest on the Filipinos was the adoption of Hispanic names, as decreed by Governor Narciso Claveria in 1849. Filipinos were obligated to adopt surnames like Rizal, Del Pilar and Luna although some indigenous surnames like Mabini and Panganiban were retained. Not only were Filipinos given family names as bases for census and statistics, but the surnames also guaranteed exact tax collection, regular performance of polos y servicios personales, and control of population movement."

 

One Scottish guy who has been here many many years and owns several businesses told me this story. He learned this from his travles and interactions with locals on various islands. I researched the information and found it to be largely true.

 

The Spanish occupied the Philippines from "New Spain" or Mexico. Although the vast majority of the ruling parties were Spanish, the majority of the actual occupiers were Mexicans.

 

The Mexicans consisted of crews from the ships, laborers, tradesmen and soldiers. So there is probably more Mexican blood in the Philippines than Spanish. I see many more Filipinos whose facial features favor Mexican decent rather than Spanish. This would also contribute to the number of Spanish surnames here.

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Bob Ward
nobody speaks Spanish in the Philippines except a tiny minority of the mega rich who wouldn't give time of day to some Spanish sex or to euphemise it slightly, a 'marriage' tourist. If you were related to somebody in the Spanish royal family, then maybe they might be interested in getting to know you - otherwise forget it.

 

you get French people dreaming that people speak French in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam as well, but guess what nobody does. Nobody speaks Dutch in Indonesia, and nobody speaks Portuguese in East Timor or Macau either.

 

May I inquire as to what classification of tourist you place yourself in? Just curious!

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julio from spain
I read in another post of yours that you intend in coming to the Philippines in order to find a nice woman.

 

My advice: Don't bother with those questions. Why would you want to stir up the [email protected]? Fact is that there are many Spanish words in the language, my wife can understand Spanish OK and wants to learn more but don't expect much love from most Filipinas for you being Spanish.

 

Keep it low and nobody will bother you for being from Spain. Speak English.

 

:welcome:

Pleased to meet you Mr. Scianna, I hope the new year changes your bad mood according to the disrespectful forms you showed.

First of all I don

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ckfm
Pleased to meet you Mr. Scianna, I hope the new year changes your bad mood according to the disrespectful forms you showed.

First of all I don

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