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miles-high

Anyone living aboard a boat?

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miles-high

Would like to hear your experience! :)

 

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On the Seine...

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Jsteam

Not yet, but planing on it!

Look forward to any replies here :drink:

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Salty Dog

Would like to hear your experience! :)

 

attachicon.gif1.JPG

On the Seine...

 

More than a few of us spent years aboard vessels... :db:

 

I've seen videos of some beautiful houseboats and yachts, but all way, way beyond my means.

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miles-high

Another one we saw on Seine...

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But here, I guess the vessel must be "seaworthy" or "blue water"-worthy??? :unknw:  :unsure:

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Salty Dog

But here, I guess the vessel must be "seaworthy" or "blue water"-worthy???  

 

 

Where is here?

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Bill H

I've lived aboard for years and loved every minute of it.  If you don't stay in marinas it's a very inexpensive way to live.  The mistake many people make when buying a boat to live on is to only consider her sailing ability (or ability under power).  However, this is a mistake, because most live-a-boards spend less than 10% of their time at sea.  Of course, you need a seaworthy boat, but most of your time living on her will be at anchor, on a mooring or at the dock, so consider her livability as much or more than her sailing characteristics.

 

You also need to consider where you will be cruising.  If in Europe and the wonderful canals are your dream, pick a boat that is not too big for the locks and does not draw too much water as some canals are not very deep.  My dream cruise goes from Antwerp through the canals to the Danube river, then down the Danube to the Black Sea.  That is a trip I'd dearly love to make.

 

America's Great Loop is another trip on my bucket list.  It's the perfect way to see the eastern seaboard and midwest by boat.  It takes a full year to complete and most do it on boats 40 feet LOA or less.


I do not believe the boat pictured above would be seaworthy for blue water cruising.  She's strictly a canal boat.  Nothing wrong with that so long as you have no intention or need to cross large open bodies of water.  So long as that boat is on canals or rivers she'd be just fine for living aboard (depending on her accommodations of course.)

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miles-high

Where is here?

 

Between Hawaii and the Philippines... any islands in-between... I have been to most islands between Hawaii and eastern Philippines (by air ;)) and I love it there... whether I can sail these waters safely is another question... I know I can navigate but... I have so much to learn...  ;)

Edited by miles-high

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AussieLex

I agree with Bill H as a live aboard you spend most of your at anchor or on a mooring with occasional trips... I sold a great heavy weather boat a couple of years ago but she wasn't much good in light winds and not the most comfortable for a live aboard but it was okay for a couple ... although at a pinch she would sleep 9 people... 

 

I am sure a few of us could answer specific questions if you have any ... I am thinking of building a catamaran to use a few days at a time or for day trips ... but lots of other things to do first that take priority ...

 

a pic of my last boat, 42 feet on deck, ferro professionally built in the UK ...

 

post-16302-0-36425800-1467560743_thumb.jpeg

 

 

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Bill H

I've crossed the Pacific, you need to really watch for weather windows or it can be a rough ride.  Most take the easy path near the equator, but then you must contend with the doldrums.  That also precludes a great circle route, which makes the trip much longer.

 

Crossing from anywhere on the West coast to Hawaii is pretty easy so long as you do it anytime but the late fall through early spring.  Do it then and expect a very rough ride.  Once in Hawaii you can island hop to your hearts content...if you have the time.

 

What kind of boat?  Sail or power?  Advantages and disadvantages to both.  I've been a sailboat guy my whole life, but lately I'm starting to see some advantages to power boats.  I especially like ocean-going trawlers (made of steel of course).

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AussieLex

Sailing between Hawaii and the Philippines shouldn't be any problem with a reasonable boat and with reasonable preparation ... I haven't done that trip but I have sailed the south western pacific and enjoyed my time on the water a great deal.  It just depends on your chosen route as to the time of year its best to do the major part of the crossing, or if you intend to island hop spending some time in each place and make a real trip of it .... I believe its mostly downhill or with the wind going from east to west, lots of guys do the trip so there should be lots of information and sailing guides available ...

 

I don't like doing long distance trips alone anymore, too much stress and shortage of sleep... the last long trip I did we had 4 of us on board and that worked well for watch keeping.

 

Remember the definition of a cruising yachtsman is working on your boat in exotic locations ... there is always something to do aboard maintenance wise ...

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Bill H

I agree with Bill H as a live aboard you spend most of your at anchor or on a mooring with occasional trips... I sold a great heavy weather boat a couple of years ago but she wasn't much good in light winds and not the most comfortable for a live aboard but it was okay for a couple ... although at a pinch she would sleep 9 people... 

 

I am sure a few of us could answer specific questions if you have any ... I am thinking of building a catamaran to use a few days at a time or for day trips ... but lots of other things to do first that take priority ...

 

a pic of my last boat, 42 feet on deck, ferro professionally built in the UK ...

 

attachicon.gifsecuredownload-1.jpeg

 

My second not built by me boat was a heavy Taiwan glass boat that needed a near gale to get moving, but once she was moving she moved well.  I went through a hurricane in that boat and never felt particularly at risk.

I'm an odd ball in that I kind of like ferro boats.  However, the build quality of these boats is all over the place and one needs to be very careful if buying one.  A professionally built ferro boat would be a good choice and probably be had cheaper than any other equivalent boat.  Home built ferro boats are always suspect.  I once looked at a ferro cutter whose builder had the brilliant idea to do her diesel fuel tanks in ferro cement too!  Concrete of course hates diesel oil which works it way through the concrete and degrades it at the same time.  You can imagine the disaster that boat was.

Edited by Paul

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AussieLex

 

 

A professionally built ferro boat would be a good choice

 

Bill my boat was a Robert Tucker professionally laid up the the UK and fitted with Kemp mast and rigging ... running a Perkins 4 236  diesel that gave an economical cruise about 1 litre per nautical mile at 6.8 knots and 1500 revs with a max speed of about 8.5 to 9 knots. She likes the wind to be 20+ knots and on the last trip from Port Douglas in North Queensland around the top of Australia it blew 30 to 45 knots for over a week and we sure covered some miles each cruising day ...  averaging 8 knots without the main up ...  around 15 knots of wind only gives about 5 to 5.5 knots ... but damn she was a solid boat and finished really well, most people thought she was fibreglass.

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Bill H
miles-high

this is what you want to look in to

"2 37D diesel engines 4,600 hp 2 electrical engines 2,500 hp"

 

The largest diesel engine I ever had was about 180 hp... Do you happen to know what the total hourly fuel consumption of those 4 engines? :D

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