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rainymike

Caution if buying Chinese made rebar

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rainymike

If building a home/wall etc. might want to read this and check on the products yourself.

 

http://www.philstar.com/opinion/2016/06/11/1591727/invasion

 

 

Over the past months, Beijing has been trying to dump steel products on the international market. China has 300 million tons excess steel production capacity and has offered its manufacturers subsidies to export that surplus production.

As China’s economy slows, that excess steel production capacity is likely to grow. If they dump that excess capacity on other economies, it will force plant closures, layoffs and bankruptcies at a major scale.

The US is so alarmed by the dumping, it has taken up the matter in their annual talks with Chinese counterparts last week. Meanwhile, US trade authorities have raised tariffs on Chinese steel exports by 522 percent to stall the trade onslaught.

The European Union has done the same and so have most of Asia’s economies. It is not only the export subsidies Beijing provides its steel exporters that threaten these economies. Much of China’s steel exports come from “pirate mills” – facilities that use obsolete technologies and produce substandard products.

These “pirate mills” have been ordered closed by Chinese authorities after buildings using inferior steel collapsed tragically in recent quakes. They still manage to sneak production and deliver to importing economies, at great peril to consumers.

Unlike the Americans, the Europeans, the Indians and others, our trade authorities have done nothing in the face of Chinese steel dumping. In one recent case, a regional official of the DTI in fact issued a “provisional” import commodity clearance for a 5,000-ton shipment of reinforcement bars from China.

Three more ships, according to industry reports, are being loaded in Chinese ports to dump more unexamined steel products on the Philippine market. This has to be the reason the syndicate facilitating this importation has gone on a frantic propaganda campaign that labels local manufacturers a “cartel” or an “old boys club.”

This powerful and well-funded syndicate, the shock troops of a Chinese steel invasion, has been at work for months now clearing the way for the dumping of Beijing-subsidized steel imports. By importing rather than building domestic manufacturing capacity, the syndicate stands to make windfall profits with hardly any risk – except, of course, the lives of Filipinos who will live and work in buildings constructed using substandard steel.

Over the past few months, the syndicate employed every devious means to block the construction of modern steel mills in the country. By doing that, in the midst of a construction boom, the syndicate hopes to create and artificial steel shortage and widen the avenue for steel importation.

Their best scenario, of course, is for our domestic steel industry to simply fold away. That will open the door for super profits for unscrupulous importers riding both on China’s subsidy for steel products and our defenseless ports.

Filipino manufacturers now find themselves at the frontline against this economic invasion – given what seems to be government’s abdication of its role in defense of domestic jobs and investment.

Local steel producers conform to very strict quality standards. Unlike anonymous exporters bringing their inferior products here, local manufacturers are accountable to the end users of their products.

Local manufacturers are required to test their product after every 20 tons of production. The steel is tested for tensile strength and chemical composition.

By contrast, importers are not required to undertake the same tests. Our ports simply do not have the facilities to perform the necessary tests. Our bureaucrats are vulnerable to bribes.

Therefore, our consumers are in peril.

Ideally, government ought to raise tariffs on Chinese steel imports to offset the subsidies the “pirate mills” enjoy. Short of that, local manufacturers want the same tests applied to imports: every 20 tons ought to be subjected to tensile strength and chemical composition.

More than just looking after their interests, local manufacturers want local consumers protected from substandard products. The destruction brought about by the Bohol earthquake and by Yolanda was magnified by widespread use in that region of smuggled steel products from China.

The profiteers who want to kill domestic manufacturing and leave us defenseless against the steel invasion from China commit treason.

Local manufacturers put in large, long-term investments to provide Filipino consumers safe and reliable products. They assume the risks attendant to such investments.

The merchant steel importers, who probably get their steel on consignment from a country struggling with surplus capacity, do not add to the country’s investment stock. They do not assume long-term risks. They are not accountable to the end users of the inferior products they bring in.

If a building that used substandard steel from some “pirate plant” in China’s interior collapses, could our justice system make that plant accountable for inferior products? Can we even identify the source of the murderous inferior building product?

Local manufacturers have their logo on every steel bar sold to the market. That is their guarantee of quality. If a product tests to be inferior, the local manufacturer could be called to account to the errant product.

The same could not be done with imported, especially smuggled, construction inputs. Some of the steel bars brought in from China do not even have logos. There is no desire here to be accountable to the end user.

More than the trade issues, the sale of products from anonymous manufacturers abroad is an issue of consumer protection and public safety. The protection and safety of our citizens are the core duties of government.

Our government will be remiss if it allows profiteers to inflict inferior products on our consumers.

 

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billy

 

 

If building a home/wall etc. might want to read this and check on the products yourself.
 
http://www.philstar.com/opinion/2016/06/11/1591727/invasion



Does this surprise you? Isnt all the steel sold here like vics hardware etc. from china? What is the option here? Edited by Paul
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rainymike

 

 

Does this surprise you? Isnt all the steel sold here like vics hardware etc. from china? What is the option here?

 

LOL ... you got me. I'm not sure I'm highly confident about Phil's made steel either. Perhaps someone in the know will have some advice. When we extended the home and built a wall, it was not something I paid attention to. I was just glad that they were using rebar in the construction. 

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Davaoeno

The article sure sounds like it is designed to manipulate - rather than inform - the reader.

 

Big clues ??? terms like  "  , the shock troops of a Chinese steel invasion  "    

 

 

 

 

 

    I like my bullshit with a little less drama please  !!

Edited by Davaoeno
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RogerDat

I am no engineer, only reading and observing what has been posted on line about proper construction in a first world environment, and comparing that to what I saw here. I always thought the rods here were soft, and I bought a breaker bar from Japan, and that confirmed my suspicions.

They are what I would call mild steel, very flexible compared to what I saw in America. Bridge and high way construction is the only place i saw them, and did not touch a bar till I came here.

To me, the bars, and cement here are soft. I built a different house. I detest the smell of cement dust. I worked as a helper in my teens and it was the hardest job I ever had.

Making sure the re-bar is deep in the cement will mitigate corrosion, and use Sahara in the mix for post and beams.

I have never seen a local house that failed quickly. but many built 20 years ago have collapsed, many because of lack of keeping water out.

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to_dave007

When I needed steel angle iron to build the fence at my house, the contractor asked me if I wanted "full standard" or "half standard" steel.  He told me that the "half standard" stuff is cheaper.  At first I thought he was just trying to push up the contract price, so I did some asking around at the local hardware stores, and sure enough the guys there had heard of full standard and half standard before. 

 

Full standard vs. Half Standard..  As an engineer the term sounded like a bit of a joke.  Either something MEETS the standard..  or it doesn't.  But it seems that other steel products like GI pipe can also be bought either full standard or half standard.   The standards for GI pipe include dimensions like thickness, and it seems well understood that the half standard stuff is thinner..  or may be thinner.  And it seems known that the half standard GI pipe is known to rust faster..  which means the galvanizing is not to same standard.

 

I have no idea how real this is, because I bought the steel for fence, and had it painted thoroughly, and the job is done, and so I didn't review any further.

 

But I am ASSUMING..  for right or wrong..  that half standard means "made in china" and "lower quality".  When I ask out here in the province, it seems virtually everyone just wants lowest price on anything they buy, and most people don't give a damn about quality...  so realistically a lot of people here WANT this half standard stuff..  and the local hardware stores in my area told me they didn't even stock full standard any more.

 

I'd be interested to hear what happens if other LINC members ask around about "full standard" and "half standard" steel.

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Sabaidi

Blaming China for our own crap is very feminine.

I guest it's also part of very big propaganda. :):):)

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Jimone

I don't know about full standard and half standard, but in Australia you can get normal, so thinking that is full standard and what they call seconds, so maybe half standard ?? 

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billy

Anyone caught selling substandard rebar should be fined and confiscated. Its for construction of buildings, but that wont happen here

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smokey

When I needed steel angle iron to build the fence at my house, the contractor asked me if I wanted "full standard" or "half standard" steel.  He told me that the "half standard" stuff is cheaper.  At first I thought he was just trying to push up the contract price, so I did some asking around at the local hardware stores, and sure enough the guys there had heard of full standard and half standard before. 

 

Full standard vs. Half Standard..  As an engineer the term sounded like a bit of a joke.  Either something MEETS the standard..  or it doesn't.  But it seems that other steel products like GI pipe can also be bought either full standard or half standard.   The standards for GI pipe include dimensions like thickness, and it seems well understood that the half standard stuff is thinner..  or may be thinner.  And it seems known that the half standard GI pipe is known to rust faster..  which means the galvanizing is not to same standard.

 

I have no idea how real this is, because I bought the steel for fence, and had it painted thoroughly, and the job is done, and so I didn't review any further.

 

But I am ASSUMING..  for right or wrong..  that half standard means "made in china" and "lower quality".  When I ask out here in the province, it seems virtually everyone just wants lowest price on anything they buy, and most people don't give a damn about quality...  so realistically a lot of people here WANT this half standard stuff..  and the local hardware stores in my area told me they didn't even stock full standard any more.

 

I'd be interested to hear what happens if other LINC members ask around about "full standard" and "half standard" steel.

well then for sure everything is half standard ..... Blue pills anyone buy branded or half standard... electronics with names close to branded names .. everything here is china wonder what type of steel pre built houses use

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Hy H

 

 

But I am ASSUMING..  for right or wrong..  that half standard means "made in china" and "lower quality".

 

A lot of stuff comes from China these days.  Half std might mean Philippines std. Other perhaps is US or European std, just made better quality thicker and stronger. 

Often think PI is just a dumping ground for seconds / rejects from suppliers around the world.

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to_dave007

A lot of stuff comes from China these days.  Half std might mean Philippines std. Other perhaps is US or European std, just made better quality thicker and stronger. 

Often think PI is just a dumping ground for seconds / rejects from suppliers around the world.

 

Normally I would agree with you..  but these days the country with the greatest overcapacity is China.. so it's China that has the most excess steel to get rid of.

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Hy H

A lot of stuff comes from China these days.  Half std might mean Philippines std. Other perhaps is US or European std, just made better quality thicker and stronger. 

Often think PI is just a dumping ground for seconds / rejects from suppliers around the world.

 

 

Normally I would agree with you..  but these days the country with the greatest overcapacity is China.. so it's China that has the most excess steel to get rid of.

 

 

Perhaps I should clarify my meaning by saying ....lot of stuff is manufactured in China....to suit standards in export destination.  Australia has its own measure for std and importer will not bring to country anything that will not meet this std. Severe penalties apply. This just my own thinking, not involved so just a thought.  Toyota made in- if made  in China would arrive with different std to US / EU / ME that is does to Philippines and so on.. Saying that it will apply to rebar as well.

Edited by Hy H

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rep1

But I am ASSUMING..  for right or wrong..  that half standard means "made in china" and "lower quality".  When I ask out here in the province, it seems virtually everyone just wants lowest price on anything they buy, and most people don't give a damn about quality...  so realistically a lot of people here WANT this half standard stuff..  and the local hardware stores in my area told me they didn't even stock full standard any more.

it's a valid option considering there are huge numbers of people who cannot even afford a house.

 

You should just move out from that area.

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burnttoast

When President Aquino toured the earthquake damaged buildings around Cebu in 2013:

 

“I noticed that the reinforcing bars were thin. I may not be a muscle-builder, but I thought I can break them by bending the steel bars just three times,”

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