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Paul

In a recent thread, the talk about voltage inverters caused me to think of something.

 

I know some of you folks will be more voiced than I am regarding power inverters. Not sure how you load them. But, one thing I learned from old school guys was, never load an inverter too heavily, especially Chinese made ones. 

 

The heaviest load I put on any inverter is 50% to 70%, tops. I never run them at 100% capacity. Imagine running one, day in, day out, at 100% rated capacity. How long would you expect it to last doing so? 

 

I had never thought about that, prior to someone asking me that question a couple years ago. 

 

Just a thought.

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Are they not rated like welders with a duty cycle?

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thebob

All engineering problems boil down to 3 factors.

 

Cheap, reliable, efficient. Pick any 2!

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easydrifter

I agree, in fact one of the ads for the el cheapo inverter I'm using now, advises to use less than 75% of the maximum rated wattage.I did watch a YouTube of a guy with a 1500 watt Meanwell inverter/charger with solar charge controller all in one, he claimed it was underrated and could handle 2,000 watts all day long, like to get my hands on one of them babies.

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Ozepete

We only employ electrical components to one third of their continuous capacity. And that capacity is what we establish the component delivers, not what the manufacturer claims.

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Mikala

Industrial inverters I've been involved with generally have a maximum 80% load, but might endure 110% during the initial few minutes of an outage. All part of the manufacture's rating though... Power plant inverters usually are there for backup only and rarely last more than a few hours on the battery banks. During that time the emergency diesel generators come up, then the blackout generator(s) will start.

 

I load my home inverters to a maximum of 50% with 100% backup (spare) inverter that automatically switches over upon failure of the primary inverter.

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Paul

Are they not rated like welders with a duty cycle?

 

Some people run on inverters 24 / 7, like in off-grid applications. Others may run two different sized inverters, a larger one for heavier, day time loads, and a smaller inverter for evening / night time loads. In most instances, they (should) run them at well under full rated capacity. 

With that said, they should be able to run, providing power continuously. 

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