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Salty Dog

I don't know how many members are/were in the United States Coast Guard. I thought I would post some of the Blog topics that might be of interest to them or other members as well. I retired in 2002 shortly after 9/11. It's an entirely different Coast Guard now. Many changes are for the better, but there are some old timers who are set in their thinking and long for the old ways. I'm probably somewhere in the middle in my thinking.
 

From the Commandant: Not in my Coast Guard
 


 
Since 1973, I have been proud to call myself a member of the United States Coast Guard, serving alongside the truly extraordinary team of 88,000 active duty, reserve, civilian and auxiliary members who sustain mission excellence.
 
I am proud to serve in an organization that upholds our Core Values of Honor, Respect and Devotion to Duty – the rock solid foundation upon which we serve our Nation.
 
Sexual assault and the behaviors that enable it are abhorrent to our Core Values and directly impact our ability to execute the mission.
 
The demands of our missions require a level of trust and respect that is violated by this terrible crime. With utmost vigilance we stand the watch, from combating transnational organized crime to fighting terrorism, to stopping human trafficking. Our duty to people demands we project this same vigilance in preventing and responding to sexual assault. We have made great strides, but we are not done yet.
 
In 2014, 254 sexual assaults were reported, 143 active duty members were investigated for sexual assault and an estimated 2,350 Coast Guard members were victims of harassment.
 
This must change.
 
Driving out sexual assault and enabling behaviors is not simply a box to check. Our commitment to fostering an environment where assault and harassment cannot thrive is never finished.
 
Your senior leadership is concentrating on three aspects of driving out sexual assault from our Service: prevention, response and accountability. We will reinforce a culture of respect inhospitable to sexual assault and the behaviors that enable it; we will continue to encourage and support sexual assault reporting and provide timely, coordinated resources to victims; we will take all reports seriously, investigate them thoroughly and analyze and share disposition trends to ensure transparency. And, we will care for those who report they have been victims and protect their rights as we protect the rights of those who are accused.
 
I mentioned the initiatives we are undertaking as an organization; however, cultural change really starts with the individual. It starts with you. Across every pay grade in the U.S. Coast Guard, we must make every effort together, we must be absolutely committed and we must call out behavior for what it is.
 
During this Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I expect each and every one of us who proudly serves our Nation to reinforce a culture of respect. We must all stand together to create an inclusive climate built upon a culture of dignity and respect. This month is not about more training, meetings or awareness campaigns – it’s about action.
 
Together, we will rid our Service of the scourge of sexual assault.

Edited by Salty Dog
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Topper

Thanks Salty. I did not realize that it was a big problem in the Coast Guard, but I guess each branch has it own problems with it. 

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Salty Dog
Times, they are a changin...
 
Human Capital Strategy: Implementation plans

 

Editor’s Note: Rear Adm. Andrew McKinley has taken over as the Human Capital Strategy (HCS) lead and has set expectations of transparency as he and the HCS team begin efforts to implement the first 31 initiatives. The HCS spans 10 years and will touch the entire Coast Guard workforce during its implementation. Below, McKinley shares more information about the initiative, and what Coast Guard members can expect in the months and years to come.
 
Written by Rear Adm. Andrew Scott McKinley

 

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Since recently joining the Human Capital Strategy Implementation Team as lead, I’ve been proud to be at the helm of such a monumental effort—one that undoubtedly will touch every corner of the Coast Guard’s service. Understanding the far reach of the task, the Human Capital Strategy Implementation Team is committed to working with initiative owners to implement the strategy with action and transparency.
 
The Human Capital Strategy is a 10-year roadmap that will guide the way we support our people, the work they do, and the workplace they do it in to create a more proficient and agile workforce that is ready to serve the needs of the nation. The strategy will create a better integrated human resource system that will help recruit, train and retain a world-class Coast Guard workforce — a workforce of which you are already a valuable asset.
 
The Human Capital Strategy Implementation Team began tracking and supporting 31 initiatives for the first 180-day plan. The 180-day plan represents our first calendar year of implementation. In November, the executive champions, FORCECOM Readiness Command and the Assistant Commandant for Human Resources, will report on progress and roll out next year’s implementation plan.
 
For transparency, we created a Coast Guard-wide portal site that includes the latest news on implementation, as well as references and resources, and initiative status information.
 
During the summer months, we will be soliciting your input to capture additional initiatives relevant to our workforce.
 
I am excited and look forward to collaborating with many of you as you share your thoughts, questions and suggestions. Remember, the power to shape the Coast Guard’s workforce is in each of our hands — let’s work together to ensure it’s the world’s best!
 
- See more at: http://allhands.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2016/05/09/update-to-the-human-capital-strategy-implementation-plans/#sthash.Wnc89D2W.dpuf

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Salty Dog

Leadership in a 21st Century Coast Guard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Scotsbloke

Enjoyable post.  Our coast guards are part of government but the 'hard miles' are done by the lifeboatmen who are, generally, volunteers:

 

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Salty Dog

PATFORSWA: Guardians of the Arabian Gulf

 

As the Coast Guard has now crossed into our 226th year of proudly serving America, we will highlight our long history of ensuring national security throughout the entire month of August. This blog is part four of our history series which will be featured every Monday in August. Join the celebration on social media by using hashtags: #HappyBdayUSCG, #CheersUSCG and #CGhistory.

 

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The sun sets behind an oil terminal as the Coast Guard Cutter Maui (WPB 1304) conducts security patrols in the North Arabian Gulf, Sept. 27. Maui is conducting Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the gulf as apart of Combined Task Force 158. MSO help set the conditions for security and stability in the North Arabian Gulf and protect Iraq’s sea-based infrastructure to help provide the Iraqi people the opportunity for self-determination. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt j.g. Peter Lang.

 

Written by Lt. Eric D. Nielsen

 

All who enter Coast Guard boot camp are asked a seemingly innocuous indoctrination question: “What is the Coast Guard?” To which the appropriate response is: “The Coast Guard is the hard nucleus about which the Navy forms in times of war, sir!”

 

There is some truth to that seemingly silly answer; for 226 years, the U.S. Coast Guard has served the nation as one of the five Armed Forces, and has served in every major American conflict since its founding as the Revenue Marine in 1790. After the Continental Navy was disbanded in 1785, the first federal Congress formed “the system of cutters” under Alexander Hamilton. From the Quasi-War with France in 1798, through the Civil War, the World Wars, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, and the Global War on Terror, the Coast Guard (and our predecessor services) have participated in U.S. naval battles around the world.

 

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Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st class Brandon Hines, a member of Coast Guard Cutter Adak’s boarding team, conducts an approach to the USS The Sullivans in the Arabian Gulf during war fighter training. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd class Andrew Vardakis.

 

Today, the Coast Guard is the nation’s oldest continuously serving sea-going service and conducts 11 different missions. One of those missions is Defense Readiness. Coast Guard Patrol Forces Southwest Asia (PATFORSWA) is at the forefront of the Defense Readiness mission. Today, PATFORSWA’s mission is to train, organize, equip, support and deploy mission-ready Coast Guard Forces in support of U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) and national security objectives.

 

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The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Adak passes by one of the numerous cargo dhows that travel along the Iraqi river coast. The Coast Guard has deployed four 110-foot patrol boats to the region to support U.S. Navy 5th Fleet and coalition forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Maritime Interception Operations to stop illegal oil smuggling and to search for terrorists. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Matthew Belson.

 

Since its establishment in 2002, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), PATFORSWA has played a key role in maritime interception operations, maritime infrastructure protection, and maritime security operations in the Arabian Gulf. During OIF, the Coast Guard provided maritime interception and boarding support to U.S. Navy and Coalition forces, security to ports in Bahrain, Kuwait and Iraq, security to Iraqi oil terminals, maritime environmental response expertise and surveyed and marked the Khawr Abd Allah River channel up-to the port of Umm Qasr, Iraq. The Coast Guard’s 110-foot patrol boats played a key role in naval combat operations, providing escort and force protection for Coalition assets, with Coast Guard Cutter Adak capturing the first naval prisoners of the war and patrolling into enemy waters during combat operations.

 

At the height of OIF operations, over 1,000 Coast Guard personnel were deployed to the Arabian Gulf, including one 378-foot high endurance cutter, an ocean-going buoy tender, four 110-foot patrol boats, four Port Security Units (PSU), two Law Enforcement Detachments (LEDET) and associated support staff.

 

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U.S. Coast Guardsman Petty Officer Nathan Bruckenthal.

 

On April 24, 2004, Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal, a damage controlman assigned to LEDET 403, and two Sailors from USS Firebolt tragically lost their lives while patrolling the security zone around the Al Basra Oil Terminal in Iraqi territorial waters. The boarding team approached a small, unidentified dhow (vessel) which abruptly maneuvered and detonated explosives packed onboard in an apparent coordinated suicide bombing. After the explosion, other U.S. forces in the area found and successfully destroyed two additional explosives-laden vessels. Three other Sailors and one Coast Guardsman were also injured in the initial attack. Sailors, Coast Guardsmen and their families join together each year April 24 at Naval Support Activity Bahrain for a memorial service to honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Pernaselli, a Navy boatswain’s mate, Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher Watts, a Navy signalman and Bruckenthal.

 

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Coast Guardsmen and Sailors stand at attention during a ceremony commemorating the 12th anniversary of a suicide bombing attack in the North Arabian Gulf against the coastal patrol ship USS Firebolt that killed two Sailors and a Coast Guardsman. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kenneth R. Hendrix.

 

Besides our work in OIF, PATFORSWA also supported Operation Enduring Freedom and in 2015 transitioned to supporting Operation Inherent Resolve. Throughout our distinguished history, the Coast Guard has maintained a unique and close relationship with the Navy – a close bond which continues today at the Coast Guard’s largest unit outside the United States.

 

PATFORSWA provides the U.S. Navy Fifth Fleet with combat-ready assets that conduct maritime security, infrastructure protection, and annually supports more than 50 exercises and military-to-military subject matter expert exchanges throughout the CENTCOM Area of Responsibility. Today, PATFORSWA is comprised of six 110-foot patrol boats, shore side support personnel, the Maritime Engagement Team and an Advanced Interdiction Team.

 

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USS The Sullivans boarding team making an approach on Coast Guard Cutter Adak in the Arabian Gulf during war fighter training. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Gregory Ostrov.

 

“PATFORSWA draws from the Coast Guard’s unique authorities and maritime security skillsets to support NAVCENT in accomplishing CENTCOM’s theater strategy to conduct persistent maritime operations to deter and counter disruptive countries, and strengthen partner nations’ maritime capabilities in the Arabian Gulf. I am continually amazed by the professionalism and skill of our PATFORSWA shipmates who volunteer for the demanding one-year tour at PATFORSWA” said Capt. John J. Driscoll, commodore of PATFORSWA.

 

Coast Guard personnel interested in a demanding and challenging tour at PATFORSWA are encouraged to apply.

 

http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2016/08/patforswa-guardians-of-the-arabian-gulf/

Edited by Salty Dog
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I think the "knee deep sailors" do a helluva job and heroic acts performed by them are common. I salute them.

 

Sexual assault was not such a big deal when I was in the military because about 98% of the women I encountered back then were butt ugly and/or mental. I kept my distance.

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Sempur paratus....can't spell darn it

Edited by kaloy
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