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Australian Pension & the two year non portability rule for expats.

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Hy H

the 2 year caper seems to affect returning aussies for the purpose of applying for the age pension!

 

in effect,,if you qualify by virtue of birth and working commitments totalling whatever timespan required,,it seems just a "bastard act" to dictate for 2 years,, what your rest of life scenario should be?

 

I do not know the facts, which side was the one implementing this 2 year rule?  Lets see, we`ll take this to elections. 

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Tamed
find it hard to stomach that an Aussie who marries to a non Aussie girl over seas and has kids must pay a couple of months of his salary to bring her home with him.

 

what's hard to swallow is going into centrelink to apply for a pension like my friend had to do and was refused by a new immigrant from India. Then on the way home we stopped in for a good ole aussie burger made by Asians. We sat next to a family of middle eastern people who were discussing how many of their cousins will be arriving this week,

 

An Aussie bring his wife here, NO way man, that is just not going to happen now with all the immigrants who have sleezed into immigration jobs and only let their contacts in.

 

welcome to Australia 2016

Edited by Tamed
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Tamed

If I was the OP I would probably take the plunge and go back to OZ. Take the family and budget for it. When you get there then get the wife working in cleaning jobs in the city average around $35 an hour (probably about 2000 pesos per hour). At least then you can go back and live on your pension for the rest of your life and it's done then, just 2 years. If planned right it should work out. Just watch those Filipino house wife clubs, I heard they can ruin a good marriage.

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newtocebu

A little late on the scene here, but it sounds like they have really tightened the screws on the citizenship by descent process.

 

We went through this back in 2012 with our first child, except it was seemingly so much easier.

 

I didnt have to do a DNA test - all we had to prove was that our relationship was genuine and that i was in country at the time of conception.

 

At the time, we were also going through the partner visa application process. One of the main criteria on the approval of the visa was proof that the relationship was genuine and continuous.

 

Both applications were flooded with passport stamps, phone records, chat records, email records, remittances etc

 

Those departments probably didnt know what hit them!!

 

We obtained the citizenship by descent within weeks of submitting the application, and the passport was only a few weeks after that.

 

The partner visa however took a lot longer (due to a few complications - failed medical)

 

We were encouraged to apply for a tourist visa whilst the partner visa was being processed.

 

What we werent told was that the 12 month tourist visa is also subject to the same health requirements as the partner visa, so that was a big fail.

 

The irony is that when applying for a 3 month tourist visa, there is absolutely no health requirement whatsoever.

 

( so how many are arriving daily with potentially deadly diseases!! )

 

Anyway, apologies for going slightly off topic.

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oztony

 

 

Just watch those Filipino house wife clubs, I heard they can ruin a good marriage.

 

Very true , a huge relationship mortality rate when you mix with the wrong crowd of Filipino's in Aus. 

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woodchopper

i refer to a simple fone call to Centrelink International as i posted earlier,,much earlier!

 

these people are no beauracrats etc,,simply employees and might give a lead,, if seemingly HARD?

 

as the original (OP) has a hearing defect etc he might need some help by a nearby expat aussie,,i would volunteer to help but not from Cebu,,full stop!

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mikewright

i refer to a simple fone call to Centrelink International as i posted earlier,,much earlier!

 

these people are no beauracrats etc,,simply employees and might give a lead,, if seemingly HARD?

 

as the original (OP) has a hearing defect etc he might need some help by a nearby expat aussie,,i would volunteer to help but not from Cebu,,full stop!

 

I rang Centrelink the other day and their phone advice isn't different from that already published by them on the Government websites:

 

 

Residence requirements for Age Pension

To be eligible for Age Pension you must satisfy residence requirements.

On the day you submit your claim, you must be:

You also need to have been an Australian resident for a continuous period of at least 10 years, or for a number of periods that total more than 10 years with one of the periods being at least 5 years, unless you:

  • are a refugee or former refugee
  • were getting Partner Allowance, Widow Allowance or Widow B Pension immediately before turning age pension age, or
  • are a woman whose partner died while you were both Australian residents, and you have been an Australian resident for 2 years immediately before claiming Age Pension

You may also meet the residence requirements if you have lived or worked in a country with which Australia has an international social security agreement.

https://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/age-pension

 

 

Rules for Age Pension outside Australia

You can generally be paid Age Pension for the whole time you are outside Australia, regardless of whether you leave temporarily or to live in another country.

 

However, the amount you receive may change at certain points based on how long you have been away and your personal circumstances.

 

If you are paid Age Pension under an international social security agreement, the amount that you receive while you are outside Australia is determined according to that agreement.

 

If you have returned to live in Australia within the last 2 years and you have started receiving Age Pension during this period, you cannot be paid outside Australia until the 2 year waiting period has passed. This rule also applies if you were previously paid under an international social security agreement while you were living outside Australia and your Age Pension continues to be paid now you have returned to live in Australia again.

 

If you are affected by this rule and you travel outside Australia while remaining an Australian resident, your absence is generally considered to be temporary and is counted as part of the 2 year period.

 

If you are affected by this rule and you travel to a country with which Australia has an international social security agreement, the agreement may allow you to continue to get Age Pension.

https://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/age-pension-while-travelling-outside-australia

 

 

Australian resident

An Australian resident is a person who is living in Australia and is either:

  • an Australian citizen
  • a permanent visa holder, or
  • a protected Special Category visa (SCV) holder
Living in Australia

Living in Australia means Australia is your usual place of residence. 

When we are deciding whether you are living in Australia, we will look at:

  • the nature of your accommodation
  • the nature and extent of your family relationships in Australia
  • the nature and extent of your employment, business or financial ties with Australia
  • the frequency and duration of your travel outside Australia, and
  • any other matter we think is relevant

https://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/residence-descriptions

 

The Centrelink guy was very helpful and knowledgeable, and was basically explaining the above in layman's terms. He emphasised that to get the pension in the first place you had to be an Australian resident, as distinct from residing in another country but just visiting Australia, and that the Department looked at this aspect pretty closely. You have to be "living in Australia" when you apply for the pension, and the things the Department considers in this regard are listed in the quote above.

 

I'd recommend that as the OP cannot make inquiries by phone, he email Centrelink with his specific queries relevant to his particular circumstances.  He can message Centrelink at https://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/contact-us/message-centrelink

Edited by mikewright
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bkkmarlowe

 

 

it sounds like they have really tightened the screws on the citizenship by descent process. We went through this back in 2012 with our first child, except it was seemingly so much easier. I didnt have to do a DNA test - all we had to prove was that our relationship was genuine and that i was in country at the time of conception.

 

I have started a new topic on Citizenship by Descent, as it maybe drifting off the subject of old age pensions...

Find it here if you are interested...

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/92312-aussie-govt-new-rules-for-citizenship-by-descent/

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Contango

I'm in a similar situation with low interest rates and the crash in the AUD.

 

However instead of investing in term deposits for which you are obliged to pay tax, I put all my funds into superannuation. I have an allocated pension which allows me to draw down 5% of my investment per annum. If your super fund is making less than 5% your capital is reduced accordingly. The beauty of this approach is that if you are over 60 you pay zero tax.

Was going to suggest this, ING living super are cheap and allow you to own ETF's and LIC's that generally return 4 or 5% have 3.1% term deposits to.

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roderick

Contango I am not used to your lingo! What are ING living, ETFs and LICs?

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ozboy

http://www.ingdirect.com.au/superannuation/living-super.html

 

http://www.sensibleinvestor.com.au/2015/05/its-you-super-so-take-control.html

 

 

 

ING Direct Living Super is an APRA regulated superfund.

ING Direct Living Super allows investors to invest in Cash, Term Deposit and Balanced Option (50% cash and 50% in shares) with no administration or investment fees.

ING Direct Living Super also allows investors to invest in individual listed securities from S&P/ASX 200, selected ETFs and LICs. At the time of this writing, this incurs a monthly fee of $15 and a brokerage fees. Unless you are an experienced investor, I would recommend my readers to abstain from investing in individual securities (stocks) and stick to broad market ETFs. 

Although not recommended, investors can also access market research and subscribe to premium research for a monthly fee of $20. The reason I do not recommend subscribing to market research is to keep the cost to bare minimum. 

ING Direct Living Super also provides insurance cover (TPD and Death). I urge my readers to perform your own due diligence (if needed, talk to financial planner) to work out if you require insurance through super and if so, the level of cover required.

ING Direct Living Super will not allow you to invest directly in property. 
Edited by ozboy

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contraman

Latest news effecting super and pensions of Australian retirees.. The Government is changing the rules and shifting the goal posts again. :banghead:

 

http://www.superguide.com.au/newsletter/federal-budget-may-2016-newsletter

Haven't got time to read through all that crap

 

I will wait for the readers digest edition :idontknow:

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oztony

Haven't got time to read through all that crap

 

I will wait for the readers digest edition :idontknow:

 

Short version ; The Government would much appreciate it if all of you old people would kindly work until 67 years of age and then exit this earth with as little noise as possible....

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Johnny S

what's hard to swallow is going into centrelink to apply for a pension like my friend had to do and was refused by a new immigrant from India. Then on the way home we stopped in for a good ole aussie burger made by Asians. We sat next to a family of middle eastern people who were discussing how many of their cousins will be arriving this week,

 

An Aussie bring his wife here, NO way man, that is just not going to happen now with all the immigrants who have sleezed into immigration jobs and only let their contacts in.

 

welcome to Australia 2016

And to make matters worse, while you are not looking Aussie politicians are greasing their own palms.. Most look forward to a hefty taxpayer paid pension for life when they retire. No questions asked!!! 

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