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Traviz

Australian Pension & the two year non portability rule for expats.

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mikewright

Don't forget to add about 60,000 peso to your costs of having your child registered as a citizen by decent for the DNA test. I have just been through it last November.

 

cheers

 

Isn't the DNA test only requested at the discretion of the Department in what it considers appropriate circumstances, not as a standard requirement, particularly where the child is the child of a married couple with both parents recorded on the birth certificate?

Edited by mikewright
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oztony

Don't forget to add about 60,000 peso to your costs of having your child registered as a citizen by decent for the DNA test. I have just been through it last November.

 

cheers

 

Welcome to the forums seram , maybe if you have time you can head to here http://www.livingincebuforums.com/forum/51-hello-introduction-forum/ 

Capture.JPGnewby.JPG

And click this button ^^^^, and tell us a bit about yourself , How long you have been in in Zamboanga City etc. 

 

Cheers Tony

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ozboy

and another important reason is ''What will happen to your family if you die in the Philippines?''   Even on a pension with no extra savings behind you, any serious illness or hospitalisations can wipe you out'' 

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fred42

When I was younger I was given all kinds of pension advice and was brought up to believe pensions were  sacred and untouchable..

What a load of bollocks that turned out to be.. 

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seram

It appears that DNA testing is the norm regardless of how much proof you have that the child is yours. My son had all the proof like birth certificate with my last name as well as baptismal cert. with my surname. Photographs from birth with me and him etc etc but the embassy wanted a DNA test.

 

It appears that this now is the way they are going.

 

good luck.. cheers 

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Traviz

It appears that DNA testing is the norm regardless of how much proof you have that the child is yours. My son had all the proof like birth certificate with my last name as well as baptismal cert. with my surname. Photographs from birth with me and him etc etc but the embassy wanted a DNA test.

 

It appears that this now is the way they are going.

 

good luck.. cheers 

Was it the Australian Embassy in Manila you were dealing with? I would have taken it further and appealed their decision. P60,000.00 is a LOT of money.

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seram

Yes it was organised by the Australian Embassy in Manila. They do the testing at St. Luke's Hospital in Manila. This is the same hospital that your girl will do her medical when applying to immigrate overseas. It will be overseen by an embassy official who will watch the process and take the blood sample of the adult and the swab in the mouth of the child.

 

My costs were $1,560 aud or 50,700 peso for the DNA tests and a St. Luke's handling fee of 2,500 peso. We had to pay 3,500 peso for the citizen by descent application. You will have the cost of accommodation in Manila, food and taxi's. Maybe you will have to fly to Manila from a province to have the tests.

 

You must be patient because they will put you through the process of just applying with documents first and then after a month tell you that u will need to do a DNA test. This will add to your cost if you live in a province and have to travel.

 

I can give more detailed info if some-one requests it. I would start another thread so this one is not hijacked.

 

regards

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Headshot

It appears that DNA testing is the norm regardless of how much proof you have that the child is yours. My son had all the proof like birth certificate with my last name as well as baptismal cert. with my surname. Photographs from birth with me and him etc etc but the embassy wanted a DNA test.

 

It appears that this now is the way they are going.

 

good luck.. cheers 

 

Please don't take offense, but were you and your child's mother married when the child was conceived? I'm not sure what criteria Australia uses to determine the necessity of a DNA test, but that seems to be the crux of whether the US government requires the test (though there are exceptions). If you were married nine months before the birth, no test is generally required. If you weren't married when the baby was conceived, then they will likely require DNA testing. It doesn't matter what is on the baby's certificates or how many pictures were taken at the child's birth, they want to know what you were doing nine months before...when you probably weren't taking any pictures.

Edited by Headshot
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seram

Headshot, We were not married at the time of his birth in 2000. We married in 2013. We applied for his Citizen by Descent visa in August 2015 and it took until November for the process to be finished. He came to Australia on the 15th of November.

 

At St. Luke's Hospital there were 2 Americans and a Canadian having the same tests. One of the Americans was very pissed about having to do the process because he had every document and photo he thought was necessary.

 

They will talk to the Mother of your child separately in a one on one interview. 

 

Maybe the US process is different but Australia normally follows the rules of either England or the USA.

 

cheers

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JonnyBravo

 

 

My costs were $1,560 aud or 50,700 peso for the DNA tests and a St. Luke's handling fee of 2,500 peso. We had to pay 3,500 peso for the citizen by descent application. You will have the cost of accommodation in Manila, food and taxi's. Maybe you will have to fly to Manila from a province to have the tests.

 

Crazy how high the costs are considering you can almost walk into any pharmacy and pick up a DNA test for $25 USD. I guess the test at St. Luke's is more accurate?....

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Headshot

Headshot, We were not married at the time of his birth in 2000. We married in 2013. We applied for his Citizen by Descent visa in August 2015 and it took until November for the process to be finished. He came to Australia on the 15th of November.

 

At St. Luke's Hospital there were 2 Americans and a Canadian having the same tests. One of the Americans was very pissed about having to do the process because he had every document and photo he thought was necessary.

 

They will talk to the Mother of your child separately in a one on one interview. 

 

Maybe the US process is different but Australia normally follows the rules of either England or the USA.

 

cheers

 

Well, I'm not surprised they required the DNA test. Unless you have a marriage certificate that predates the birth by at least nine months, then all the documents in the world will likely not get you out of the DNA testing. They consider that marriage at the time of conception is proof-positive of the child being yours. Barring that, they want DNA proof.

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seram

They consider that marriage at the time of conception is proof-positive of the child being yours. Barring that, they want DNA proof.

 

Wow. Marriage at the time of conception being "Proof Positive" is a big call. The US are very trusting.

 

I know a guy that married a Pinay in Cavite but he was still living in Canada travelling to the Phil's three times a year. They rented in a condo in Cavite. She became pregnant and claimed the child was his until his wife had a fight with the neighbor.

 

The neighbor spilled the beans on the wife about her pinoy boyfriend that lived in the condo when he was out of the country.

 

My passport stamps had to prove that I was in the Philippines at the time of conception.It meant nothing nor would a marriage certificate but as you say Australia may be more stricter the the USA.

 

cheers

Edited by seram
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Traviz

Well, I'm not surprised they required the DNA test. Unless you have a marriage certificate that predates the birth by at least nine months, then all the documents in the world will likely not get you out of the DNA testing. They consider that marriage at the time of conception is proof-positive of the child being yours. Barring that, they want DNA proof.

For my case I hope that's accurate, as the DNA costs are exorbitant and the procedures tedious !

My wife and I have been married and always together for four years now living in the Philippines, before she finally conceived.

The baby is obviously mine too, as how many Filipino babies have white skin, blue eyes and blond hair? :) 

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mikewright
They consider that marriage at the time of conception is proof-positive of the child being yours. Barring that, they want DNA proof.

 

There is a longstanding legal presumption that a child born in wedlock is the biological offspring of the husband.

 

 

The presumption that a child born in wedlock is the biological offspring of the husband is one of the oldest and strongest presumptions in the Anglo-American legal tradition. It often took the guise of an evidentiary rule barring husband and wife from testifying about lack of sexual intercourse around the time of conception. The principle is also known as Lord Mansfield's Rule, named after an English noble, who articulated it in the name of "decency, morality, and policy" to prevent husband and wife from bastardizing the children of their marriage, 98 Eng.  Rep. 1257 (1777), at 1258

http://www5.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/MurUEJL/1995/31.html

 

However, the presumption is rebuttable. Normally the parentage of a child would not be questioned if the child was born in wedlock. and the birth certificate records the details of the parents. However, the Department can request DNA proof if it believes it appropriate to do so.

Edited by mikewright
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Jsteam

 

 

However, the Department can request DNA proof if it believes it appropriate to do so.

 

And if you live in Oz and try to do a dna test without a court order you go to jail! ( Men only! The sluts can do anything) :wheel:

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