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LED 12 VDC lighting problems.


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Oz Jon

As Oz Jon stated earlier the desulfaters works by putting 30 to 60 volt spikes to the battery

 

I would not have 30 to 60 volt pulses go to my 12 volt leds

it may burn them out or at least shorten the life of them

Me neither!

 

I wouldn't leave a pulser attached to working batteries -I think that it's more of a tool to recover some performance from otherwise dead/dieing batteries, separated from their usual working loads.

 

Sorry Roger, but there is a bit too much "sales and marketing speak" in that stuff you quoted [message #59} for my liking.

 

From my experience, pulsers are useful tools, but I wouldn't leave them connected to operational batteries.

 

Keeping your working batteries charged/floated by a good, smart/3-stage charger is all you need..

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First, do not buy any more automotive batteries. You haven't read enough of the solar / alternative energy threads on this site.   "Solar" batteries are heavier than automotive batteries for a reaso

Best to not allow your battery to go down to below about 11.5V or you will be killing it off rather quickly, deep cycle or not! Most likely your battery is rated 450CCA (cranking amp rating) not 450

please explain a bit more about what your numbers mean.   I'm guessing that your first line means that a 5W LED draws .42 Amps and that you have 10 of them (running for 12 hours?) Similarly, 2W LED

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easydrifter

Nice thing about a good old fashioned "dumb charger" is that it will sit there and boil the acid until you're satisfied that it's mixed up enough.

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Paul

Keeping your working batteries charged/floated by a good, smart/3-stage charger is all you need..

 

 

I agree with Woolf and Jon. Roger, here is how controllers are designed to charge deep cycle batteries:

 

charge_stages.png

 

And, while state of charge may vary somewhat from battery to battery, this is a good scale to go by. People often think a battery is NOT dead, even if a meter attached to it shows 10v to 11v. They couldn't be more wrong:

 

battery-state-of-charge.jpg

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RogerDat

So what do you think of the charger I found in the post that mentioned the Samlex SEC-1230A?

It is the only post / charger that looks like it meets my needs.

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Woolf

So what do you think of the charger I found in the post that mentioned the Samlex SEC-1230A?

It is the only post / charger that looks like it meets my needs.

 

 

Looks as being just what you need

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Paul

So what do you think of the charger I found in the post that mentioned the Samlex SEC-1230A?

It is the only post / charger that looks like it meets my needs.

 

Never seen / used them directly. Have not heard anything negative about them, though. 

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Oz Jon

Yes, the charger you flagged is a 3-stage charger and will handle your battery fine.

 

It looks to me like a bit of an overkill at 30 Amps rating, since I calculate your maximum current drain to be 17.65 Amps with all LEDs lit.

A cheaper 20 Amp charger would handle that load OK, but over design is fine if you are happy with the product and it's price.

 

I've never really understood exactly what you aim to do or the wiring arrangements.

My circuit I drew earlier (post #14) assumed that you don't need some non-essential load during mains power failures. So you split the loads with a relay.

 

I think that you said that your essential overnight load was only 5 amps - that's how I concluded that 10Amp smart/3-stage charger would charge your battery, together with a cheaper simple 20 Amp charger to run all the LEDs when mains power was available.

 

If you don't split the load into essential and non-essential, then you will need a much bigger battery to support the whole load during overnight power failures. And a big charger to support that battery.

[maybe, that's what you plan to do?]

 

You seemed to be concerned about sourcing the 12v relay* in my circuit - as others have pointed out, they are readily available (sometimes called horn relays or spotlight relays) at auto shops anywhere (even Cebu! - Lol!) at less than $10 ea.

 

Good luck with it all!

 

*Ask for a 12V DC coil and 20-30 Amp DC rated changeover contacts - (the pin connection lables are printed or molded onto the plastic case)

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Oz Jon

I am NOT running 6 amps, my new clamp on says 1.7 with all automatic, and manually switched lights on.

 

Sorry Roger - something 's wrong, your numbers just "do not compute!"

 

you said earlier:

 

"I have approaching a 6 amp draw with 10, 5 watt, 1, 1 watt, 1,6 watt, and 18, 0.1 watt LED lights."

 

10 @ 5W = 50W

1 @ 1W = 1W

1 @ 6W = 6W

18 @.1W = 1.8W

 

TOTAL = 59W ..... for a 12V supply, that's close enough to 5 Amps

- not 6 Amps and certainly NOT 1.7 Amps

 

5 Amps essential load is  what I assumed back in post # 14.

However, since then I found out that Cebu's shortest day is 11hrs 20 mins.

So to cover the longest night of about 13 hrs @ 5 Amps, you will burn 13x5 = 65 Ahrs

 

You shouldn't discharge your battery beyond about 50% capacity, so you need about 130 Ahrs of battery capacity. A bit more capacity would be good.

 

A 10 Amp smart/3-stage charger will re-charge that nicely and keep it fully charged and floating.

 

A very cheap, dumb/1-stage 20 Amp charger and the 12V relay complete the system.

 

Best way to measure the current is with the 10A DC current range available on even the cheapest ($10) multi-meter.

Switch the meter to the 10A DC current range, open the connection between the battery and load and wire the meter "in series" between the battery and the load.

Meter positive (red) to the battery positive and meter negative (black) to the load.

 

edit - If those Wattages are not precise, (or your voltage was up around 14V) maybe your 6 Amp result is correct? - you need to measure it with a reliable meter.

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RogerDat

Well I got a new clamp on amp meter, turned all manual lights on while all automatic lights were on, and got 1.7 to 2.2 amps.

This charger has everything I think I need to keep the P10000.00 battery charged, and the lights on. I should have room to grow the circuit.

Say 2.2 Amps draw, x 8 hours should be 17.6 AH each night, or am I figuring it wrong?

Sometimes rating printed on box is not true watts.

Also the guy who posted the original post has been using this charger with the same type battery for several years.

I can also order it and have my daughter bring it in July.

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RogerDat

 

 

I’m also using a Power Pulse desulfator connected to the batteries. This is optional, but I think its really helped. Over time, sulphate will form on the lead plates in the batteries causing reduced capacity. The desulfator helps prevent and even reverse the sulfation. It’s not perfect and the batteries won’t last forever, but it helps. Before I hooked the desulfator up to the golf cart batteries, I hooked it up to an old 37 AH SLA battery pack that had been in use for about 10 years and was starting to show substantial wear. I kept the Power Pulse desulfator on the battery pack along with a 500 mAH charger for a few weeks, putting it through a few charge/discharge cycles and it really helped improve the condition of the old battery pack. I wish I’d gotten a second Power Pulse desulfator to use on my car battery.

 

Having had time to think about this item, the way it is connected, I think it must be some kind of capacitor that has a self actuated discharge. what say U oz Jon?

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Woolf
Oz Jon

Having had time to think about this item, the way it is connected, I think it must be some kind of capacitor that has a self actuated discharge. what say U oz Jon?

Something like that Roger.

Usually a capacitor to store charge, some kind of switch circuit and an inductor to produce the voltage spike.

Sometimes (less frequently) a pulse generator and a step-up transfomer

 

Woolf beat me to it suggesting that there are many DIY circuits available on the web.

 

As for your Wattage, current and Ahr ratings ....... Whatever combination you've got apparently works OK!

 

As I said before - "any solution that works is a good solution!" - Lol!

 

Cheers!   Enjoy!

Edited by Oz Jon
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