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LED 12 VDC lighting problems.


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RogerDat

 

 

I have approaching a 6 amp draw with 10, 5 watt, 1, 1 watt, 1,6 watt, and 18, 0.1 watt LED lights.

 

I am NOT running 6 amps, my new clamp on says 1.7 with all automatic, and manually switched lights on.

 

The store is Seguro Marketing Pier 4 North reclamation area, go toward pier 4 entranc and make a u turn and come back to the pier road and make a right, its on the right side. Do NOT make a left turn on this road at red light as it is a high speed container truck route, you can die there. Yellow building with red strips. Tel # 416 6790. they also have a store on Colon street.

 

I found an UPS homemade here in Cebu post that is what I need I think.

  1. A pair of 6 volt golf cart batteries wired in series
  2. An automatic battery charger with a DC UPS mode
  3. A 300 watt sine wave inverter (I do not need this as I am only interested in 12VDC)
  4. I’m using a Samlex SEC-1230A 12 Volt 30 Amp Automatic Battery Charger. I have the DIP switch settings set to “Battery with Load” so the charger effectively becomes a DC UPS. There’s a good manual that explains the settings, and it’s available from the Samlex website as a PDF.

    The charger comes wired for 120V 60Hz input, but there’s an internal jumper that can be changed to make it 230V 50Hz. If you do that, you need to change the fuse as well. I made the change, and use it with a 220V 60Hz power source and so far I haven’t had any problems.

  5. I have requested information on price and shipping.

http://www.kilovox.com/homemade-ups/ It goes on for several pages, and rambles, so will not post.

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First, do not buy any more automotive batteries. You haven't read enough of the solar / alternative energy threads on this site.   "Solar" batteries are heavier than automotive batteries for a reaso

Best to not allow your battery to go down to below about 11.5V or you will be killing it off rather quickly, deep cycle or not! Most likely your battery is rated 450CCA (cranking amp rating) not 450

please explain a bit more about what your numbers mean.   I'm guessing that your first line means that a 5W LED draws .42 Amps and that you have 10 of them (running for 12 hours?) Similarly, 2W LED

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thebob

 

 

The charger comes wired for 120V 60Hz input, but there’s an internal jumper that can be changed to make it 230V 50Hz. If you do that, you need to change the fuse as well.

 

It's 60hz here not 50!

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Paul

I still can't get my head around the reasons behind a 20 ampere battery charger not being suitable to charge a 200 AH battery. Can anyone explain that to me?

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RogerDat

Per your post, whats going on man? "but there’s an internal jumper that can be changed to make it 230V 50Hz. If you do that, you need to change the fuse as well".

I just want to know, please do not take this as a attack! LOL

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RogerDat

Paul, I have no idea, nor did the store, I just noticed the sticker on the back as I was attempting to hook it up.

It even had a warning to NOT "test" the safety features as it could cause damage.

I got an email today about the charger I posted. It is $180 delivered to my daughters address in US, she is coming herewith our youngest grand son in July, and will bring it, I hope it is not too heavy.

 

Looks like a good charger as per the review by the guy living here and having used in the very way I need to.

Edited by RogerDat
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Woolf

Per your post, whats going on man? "but there’s an internal jumper that can be changed to make it 230V 50Hz. If you do that, you need to change the fuse as well".

I just want to know, please do not take this as a attack! LOL

 

If it is the unit I posted in #48

it has an input range of 50-60 Hz   and you can change the input voltage  120 or 230

Edited by Woolf
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Woolf
I hope it is not too heavy.  

 

Again in section 7  as in earlier link

2.2 kg to 2.9 kg  depending on model

Edited by Woolf
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RogerDat

I can't find section 7 about the weight, but page 5, post 5 says Samlex SEC-1230A 12 Volt 30 Amp Automatic Battery Charger.

This is the charger I will order.

While I have you, what is your opinion about this item?Below are his comments, not mine.

post-7667-0-14327300-1465622323.jpg

 

 

I’m also using a Power Pulse desulfator connected to the batteries. This is optional, but I think its really helped. Over time, sulphate will form on the lead plates in the batteries causing reduced capacity. The desulfator helps prevent and even reverse the sulfation. It’s not perfect and the batteries won’t last forever, but it helps.

Before I hooked the desulfator up to the golf cart batteries, I hooked it up to an old 37 AH SLA battery pack that had been in use for about 10 years and was starting to show substantial wear. I kept the Power Pulse desulfator on the battery pack along with a 500 mAH charger for a few weeks, putting it through a few charge/discharge cycles and it really helped improve the condition of the old battery pack. I wish I’d gotten a second Power Pulse desulfator to use on my car battery.

Edited by RogerDat
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Woolf

Here you have some information about the Power Pulse unit

 

http://www.pulsetech.net/PP12L-PowerPulse-12Volt-Battery-Maintenance-System-7291.aspx

 

I do not know enough  about charging batteries  to commend on it

Edited by Woolf
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Oz Jon

Lead-acid Batteries suphate when left undercharged (ie. not fully charged) for lengthy periods. Lead sulphate forms on the plates.

 

Lead sulphate is not part of the design chemistry of batteries, so the battery's capacity is reduced because it removes some lead from the plates and blocks access to some remaining parts.

 

The process is normally irreversible, but can be improved by "blasting" sulphate off the plates with pulses of high voltage.

 

That's what this kind of device does - produces short voltage spikes of maybe 30-60V.

 

I know nothing about the model pictured above, but I have used others (including a DIY design) on very sick batteries.

They usually make some (or a lot of) improvement but sometimes the battery is too far gone for recovery.

 

You shouldn't get significant sulphation on a well maintained battery and a smart (3-stage) charger combination with mains supply (most of the time).

The charger should fully charge the battery then "float" it to retain full charge.

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Woolf

 

 

That's what this kind of device does - produces short voltage spikes of maybe 30-60V.  

 

That is what I though that the device does produce high voltage for a short time

 

So do NOT use the device when the battery  is connected to a load or the charger

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RogerDat
So do NOT use the device when the battery is connected to a load or the charger

 

In his post he states and pictures just that, so I will have to find a better explanation of this thing.

 

This guy has answers for all the questions it seams.

PP-12-L PowerPulse 12 Volt Desufator 735X012

Selected as a Top 50 Product by Automotive Engineering magazine, the 12-Volt PowerPulse is designed to ensure maximum battery performance on single 12-volt lead-acid batteries. It also works on two or three 12-volt batteries connected in parallel. This unit is ideal for virtually any kind of vehicle or equipment that is charged on a regular basis, including cars, over-the-road trucks, delivery trucks, boats, emergency vehicles, generators and much more. It comes with lugs that connect directly to the battery terminals.

PowerPulse is not a charger. It's a performance device designed to help batteries charge faster and provide maximum performance and power. This patented unit uses revolutionary ReNew-IT Pulse Technology™ to safely prevent the main cause of battery problems and failure: sulfation buildup on lead-acid battery plates. Used extensively by the consumers and the U.S. Military worldwide for almost ten years, this technology has been scientifically proven by two major universities to make batteries work harder and last longer than you ever thought possible.

Edited by RogerDat
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Woolf
That's what this kind of device does - produces short voltage spikes of maybe 30-60V.

 

As Oz Jon stated earlier the desulfaters works by putting 30 to 60 volt spikes to the battery

 

I would not have 30 to 60 volt pulses go to my 12 volt leds

it may burn them out or at least shorten the life of them

Edited by Woolf
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