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Interpol Clearance for Adoption Proceedings


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bkkmarlowe

I was told (by a LinC member) that there is a Cebu Interpol office next door

to the Police Station Number Two on Jones/Osmena Bldvd.

 

I dont know if it is still operating, but maybe worth checking out if it is still there... ?

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Surprise.. surprise !!   I googled "how to obtain Interpol Clearance" and turned up this Philippine INTERPOL CLEARANCE APPLICATION FORM. Lord knows what effort is required to complete it and get it

I've been through the adoption process. If I recall, there are a variety of posts in the LinC files on the topic. You may find useful info there.   I'm not especially surprised there is some added

You may be able to use the marriage certificate which was filed locally at least to get the ball rolling. The NSO has had instances where the preparation of the official document was nothing more tha

RedRanger

I think you must have children living with you for two years before they can go to USA via adoption. 

 

Philippines is part of the Hague treaty on adoption from my brief research in the past.

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SumDumJoe

 Just an update on our process so far.

 

 What a farce this entire process has been. So far I have gotten the Bragangay clearance, Police clearance, NBI clearance, Fiscal clearance and Judicial clearance. (our attorney told us to forget the Interpol clearance) With the exception of when I picked up NBI clearance, I never had to show any ID for these clearances. We got our Judicial clearances yesterday. We walked into the office and told  them what we needed. They had us write down our names and address, hand 120 pesos to the clerk and ten minutes later we had our clearance. Again, no one checked to see if we were who we said we were. Even if they did, there was no check what so ever if there was a pending case against either one of us. I watched the lady read our names and then start chicken pecking at an ancient typewriter that we were clear. Unreal. What a colossal waste of time and energy.  

 

 But we keep soldiering on. 

 

 Only two road blocks left. 

 

 Roadblock one. I need a medical clearance. The day I went to get mine, my BP was 130/80. (No idea how it could have been high after such a peaceful commute into town) The "doctor" refused to give me medical clearance because I have "high blood". Great. So we go home and the wife makes me drink chayote juice. It works. Checked BP at home several times over the past two weeks, always 120/80. Head back to the clinic. Doctor is now on leave for three weeks. Sorry Po. Can we go to another clinic? Nope. Clearance must come from the government clinic in your area. We tried a private clinic, but the doctor told us nothing he gives us is admissible in court. At least he was honest with us. So we wait.

 

 Roadblock two. This one has my blood boiling. We have been waiting for our NSO marriage certificate since the middle of December. We were married in Kuwait in 2011. The NSO contacted the DFA in Manila. They can't locate any of our records. They send two faxes to the Embassy in Kuwait asking for their copy of our marriage contract, both faxes went unanswered. Finally the DFA in Manila asks us to contact the Embassy in Kuwait and see if we can get an answer. Several phone calls and emails go completely unanswered. Finally we send a friend that is still in Kuwait over to the Embassy to find out what is going on. Now they answer my email. Sorry we can not locate your records. Just resubmit everything in quadruplicate to the nearest DFA. So now we have to spend more time and money to travel to Cebu to resubmit our paperwork. Here is the best part. From what I have read on line, it generally takes six months from the time you submit anything to the DFA until the NSO can issue you a certified copy of the document.

 

 Does anyone have experience submitting things to the DFA and how long it actually takes to get an NSO copy?

 

 Any idea how long it takes to get into the DFA to submit documents? Is there an appointment system like at the U.S. Embassy?

 

 

Thanks for any help or Info. 

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Jawny

Just an update on our process so far.

 

 What a farce this entire process has been. So far I have gotten the Bragangay clearance, Police clearance, NBI clearance, Fiscal clearance and Judicial clearance. (our attorney told us to forget the Interpol clearance) With the exception of when I picked up NBI clearance, I never had to show any ID for these clearances. We got our Judicial clearances yesterday. We walked into the office and told  them what we needed. They had us write down our names and address, hand 120 pesos to the clerk and ten minutes later we had our clearance. Again, no one checked to see if we were who we said we were. Even if they did, there was no check what so ever if there was a pending case against either one of us. I watched the lady read our names and then start chicken pecking at an ancient typewriter that we were clear. Unreal. What a colossal waste of time and energy.  

 

 But we keep soldiering on. 

 

 Only two road blocks left. 

 

 Roadblock one. I need a medical clearance. The day I went to get mine, my BP was 130/80. (No idea how it could have been high after such a peaceful commute into town) The "doctor" refused to give me medical clearance because I have "high blood". Great. So we go home and the wife makes me drink chayote juice. It works. Checked BP at home several times over the past two weeks, always 120/80. Head back to the clinic. Doctor is now on leave for three weeks. Sorry Po. Can we go to another clinic? Nope. Clearance must come from the government clinic in your area. We tried a private clinic, but the doctor told us nothing he gives us is admissible in court. At least he was honest with us. So we wait.

 

 Roadblock two. This one has my blood boiling. We have been waiting for our NSO marriage certificate since the middle of December. We were married in Kuwait in 2011. The NSO contacted the DFA in Manila. They can't locate any of our records. They send two faxes to the Embassy in Kuwait asking for their copy of our marriage contract, both faxes went unanswered. Finally the DFA in Manila asks us to contact the Embassy in Kuwait and see if we can get an answer. Several phone calls and emails go completely unanswered. Finally we send a friend that is still in Kuwait over to the Embassy to find out what is going on. Now they answer my email. Sorry we can not locate your records. Just resubmit everything in quadruplicate to the nearest DFA. So now we have to spend more time and money to travel to Cebu to resubmit our paperwork. Here is the best part. From what I have read on line, it generally takes six months from the time you submit anything to the DFA until the NSO can issue you a certified copy of the document.

 

 Does anyone have experience submitting things to the DFA and how long it actually takes to get an NSO copy?

 

 Any idea how long it takes to get into the DFA to submit documents? Is there an appointment system like at the U.S. Embassy?

 

 

Thanks for any help or Info.

 

Could you just get married here? I'm not joking. Essentially you both would show up with a negative CENOMAR as it is now.

 

That seems like a pretty low threshold for "high blood".

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SumDumJoe
Could you just get married here? I'm not joking. Essentially you both would show up with a negative CENOMAR as it is now. That seems like a pretty low threshold for "high blood". Like This

 

 That was my first thought was to just get remarried here, but think about how it will look to the court.

 A couple that has been married since 2011 or a couple that was just married yesterday?

 

 My plan is to submit a notarized copy of our marriage certificate along with all of the email traffic that shows DFA in Manila and the Embassy in Kuwait totally dropped the ball. Whether that will fly or not remains to be seen.

 

 That is an extremely low threshold for "high blood". (maybe she will come back from her vacation in a better mood) Not to even mention the fact that was the sole criteria used to determine whether or not I was medically fit to take care of the kids. It was literally the only test they did of any kind. And honestly, if I were in poor health, wouldn't that be reason to speed things along so that the kids are named as my legal heirs if something should happen to me?

 

 I feel so much better just having vented. Thank goodness the wife let's me drink on Fridays nights. Too bad it has to be SMB, but beggars can't be choosers. 

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Jawny

That was my first thought was to just get remarried here, but think about how it will look to the court.

 A couple that has been married since 2011 or a couple that was just married yesterday?

 

 My plan is to submit a notarized copy of our marriage certificate along with all of the email traffic that shows DFA in Manila and the Embassy in Kuwait totally dropped the ball. Whether that will fly or not remains to be seen.

 

 That is an extremely low threshold for "high blood". (maybe she will come back from her vacation in a better mood) Not to even mention the fact that was the sole criteria used to determine whether or not I was medically fit to take care of the kids. It was literally the only test they did of any kind. And honestly, if I were in poor health, wouldn't that be reason to speed things along so that the kids are named as my legal heirs if something should happen to me?

 

 I feel so much better just having vented. Thank goodness the wife let's me drink on Fridays nights. Too bad it has to be SMB, but beggars can't be choosers.

 

I expect these issues will end up being "fond memories" of the adoption process. If it's any consolation, others have been thorough this and it worked out. Our adoption took around four years from start to finish.

 

After the initial process we went through ( sans the Interpol business) we finally ended up in court. That was routine, sort of. The attorney goes through the process by bringing the various documents in as evidence and then witnesses will testify as to their validity.....such as any home study done. I recall testifying about the accuracy of my own passport. Keep in mind, the attorney gets an appearance fee for each time a court process is required. Get the picture? Think ₽₽₽

 

So, after around a year or so (lots of cancellations of court dates) the judge made a decision and it was over.......WAIT!

 

What is a routine procedure without a surprise? Like being told your normal blood pressure is "high blood"....surprise!

 

In court, the solicitor general (SOLGEN) Is the agency that protects the child. So, the local fiscal acts on behalf of the SOLGEN. However, after the judge makes his ruling, the actual SOLGEN will take a quick look at the decision and can appeal. In effect, if the SOLGEN should decide there is some reason the process was not done properly, they can appeal the judge's decison.

 

That's exactly what happened. There was never a reason given, We waited for over a year before the SOLGEN finally dropped the appeal with no explanation.

 

There's more, but I just wanted to assure you it will end up fine in the end and it is a good thing to accomplish.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

 

I was told in a briefing today there is a new requirement for foreigners adopting here in the Philippines

 

Where was the briefing that you referred to and did you manage to get the Interpol clearance?

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My question is this: If you are married to a filipina with a child, and you want to adopt: does the USC need to live in country for three years? What about age- what if they are more than 45 yrs than the child? Doesn't the adoptive USC need to be not more than 45 years?

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towboat72

Thank you for posting this.we are going to be starting this process soon and you guys have already answered so many of my questions thanks again

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Jawny

The process may seem overwhelming at first, but it is not so complex. If you look into the archives there are several threads in the topic.

 

Keep in mind that the adoption process itself is completed here. However, if you are intending to immigrate with the child, then there are some other hoops to be jumped through. Depends upon your home country rules. Asking Shadow about this is a good start when that time comes.

 

I recall the process of getting a tax number for my child became a ridiculously irritating back and forth game. Supposed to be a simple procedure, but the documents and process just assumed the child would be immigrating. So, for example the forms for the ITIN asked for "entry date". Hard to have an "entry date" without having entered.

 

We were able to get the ITIN process completed through the help of others.....another subject, another time.

 

Adoption is the way to go if you have a lifelong commitment.

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SumDumJoe

Where was the briefing that you referred to and did you manage to get the Interpol clearance?

 

 Sorry MaKe , I just saw this question. 

 

 The briefing I attended was in Tagbilaran City on Bohol, done by the DSWD. 

 So far our lawyer has not said anything else about the Interpol clearance.

 I think it may not be necessary, but who really knows. 

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Jawny

Sorry MaKe , I just saw this question. 

 

 The briefing I attended was in Tagbilaran City on Bohol, done by the DSWD. 

 So far our lawyer has not said anything else about the Interpol clearance.

 I think it may not be necessary, but who really knows.

 

I was reading once again the adoption process materials at the DSWD website and that lead me to the Inter-country Adoption Management Development Board (ICAB). This is an agency involved when it is an adoption by a foreign national NOT living here. I wouldn't be surprised if the DSWD was lecturing about the intercountry aspects as opposed to your situation.

 

Out of sight, out of mind. So long as the attorney doesn't bring it up, no problem.

 

Keep us posted of you can.

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RogerDuMond

Blood pressure of 130/80 is high normal, but well below the 139/89 which is considered the maximum of the normal range.

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Nangulo

Yeah, that BP was not all that high for a rejection.

And, take a look at your Police and NBI clearances.  I'd think they would both expire before you get to submit.

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