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I <3 Cebu

Hot water without electricity

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I <3 Cebu

 

heat_water_without_electricity-680x365.p

 

Found this a bit interesting, great for province living, could easily incorporate a hot plate so the boiler can be used for cooking too. The downer would be finding an old tank in the Philippines, people just throw them away here in Aus..

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noddle

When it's time for me to live there,

I will use a long length of black poly pipe on the roof ( coiled ), and run water through it,  should make enough hot water to warm a tub / large bucket, for my bath / shower

and it would be cheap..

 

Nigel

Edited by noddle
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Paul

When it's time for me to live there,
I will use a long length of black poly pipe on the roof ( coiled ), and run water through it,  should make enough hot water to warm a tub / large bucket, for my bath / shower
and it would be cheap..
 
Nigel

 

It's easy to heat water. Just use a smaller version of a pool solar water heater. 

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_fp_diagram.jpg

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_P6070227.JPG

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_photo2.jpg

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_photo3.jpg

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_photo4.jpg

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_photo5.jpg

 

solar_pool_heater_diy_photo8.jpg

 

Source

 

====================================================

 

However, a thermosiphon water heater is probably your best long term choice.

 

Thermo10.jpg

 

thermosiphon.jpg

 

solar_water_heater_1.jpg


Found this a bit interesting, great for province living, could easily incorporate a hot plate so the boiler can be used for cooking too. The downer would be finding an old tank in the Philippines, people just throw them away here in Aus..


That is Scott Hunt, out of South Carolina. I have been following his channel for ages. He has a lot of good videos to view. Edited by Paul
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SkyMan

I was thinking about doing something like this for a pool...

post-1-0-10086900-1451039541.jpg

But I was thinking without the pump and filter.  The water from the pool would come from the bottom of the pool, the coldest water, and the return(s) would also be near the bottom in a different area so the warm water would enter and rise through the pool heating it more evenly.  It would probably only need a check valve once the coils heated a little the circulation would start completely passively.  However, you're going to need some kind of pump/filtration system anyway so this is excellent.  The heating of the water and natural circulation would really be a plus to make the pumps job easy.

 

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Paul

Another idea, so you don't have to concern yourself with where your water heating panels are, in relation to the tank, would be to buy a hot water pump.

60_62r.JPG

Mount a NC (normally closed) thermostat to the side of your water tank. Connect it in series with the pump, above, and it will "open" when the water is hot enough, breaking the circuit to the pump. (I would not suggest using a thermostat rated over 140° F / 60° C. If children are in the home, I would suggest a 120° F / 49° C thermostat.) When the water temperature drops again, the thermostat will close, powering the pump and moving water from the solar panel(s), to the tank.

===================================

There are also temperature differential switches you can buy and connect to these same pumps. When the water temperature offset reaches a certain point, it connects power to the pump. once the temperature equalizes to both settings, power is cut from the pump.

Tons of ways to cycle / switch / pump the water you have successfully heated for your home.

Edited by Paul

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Peter C

Mount a NO (normally closed) thermostat to the side of your water tank. Connect it in series with the pump, above, and it will "open" when the water is hot enough, killing the power to the pump. (I wouldn't suggest using a thermostat rated over 140° F / 60° C.) When the water temperature drops again, the thermostat will close, powering the pump, cycling water from the solar panel(s), to the tank.

 

 

thanks for the info Paul, but I think, you made a mistake NO is "normally open", while NC is "normally closed"

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Paul

 

 

thanks for the info Paul, but I think, you made a mistake NO is "normally open", while NC is "normally closed"

 

Thanks. It was supposed to be normally closed. I will fix that now.

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cvgtpc1

post-1-0-69366000-1451039554.jpg

 

Stupid question maybe, if they painted the wood black would the water get hotter?  I know it can't get hotter than boiling....

 

Along the same lines is pressure relief needed to expend any steam so nothing ruptures?

 

Maybe I'm over-thinking this haha!

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Paul
Along the same lines is pressure relief needed to expend any steam so nothing ruptures?

 

I could be wrong here. But, this is what I think. First, the tubing is 16mm (1/2 inch) x 60m (197 feet) long. It will take the pump 6.4 hours (according to calculations from the source site) to turn over the full capacity of water in the pool. The water will never turn to steam in the lines, as it is constantly being circulated. The pump never stops running.

 

But,you have a point concerning other hot water heating systems. On a system where you have actual solar water heating panels, there will be a reason to put a pressure relief valve on top of the holding tank.

 

See the drawing I previously posted:

Thermo10.jpg
 
By the way, I calculated how much water capacity each panel (tubing) would have, at 16mm (1/2 inch) x 60m (197 feet) long. Each one would have a capacity of 2.007 US Gallons, or about 7.6 Liters.
Edited by Paul

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Woolf

In denmark the "water" circulating in the solar heating element go to a heating coil in the storage tank

so the drinking water is separated from the circulating "water"

 

We need to add antifreeze to the solar circulation fluid to prevent it from freezing in the winters

 

Even on a day with frost the solar element can add heat to the water,  as long as the sun shines on the element

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Paul

In denmark the "water" circulating in the solar heating element go to a heating coil in the storage tank

so the drinking water is separated from the circulating "water"

 

We need to add antifreeze to the solar circulation fluid to prevent it from freezing in the winters

 

Even on a day with frost the solar element can add heat to the water,  as long as the sun shines on the element

 

We would call that a heat exchanger. The heated water from the collector passes through a coil inside the storage tank, transferring its heat to the water surrounding the coil.

 

solar_water_heater.gif

 

We also used a similar system on tanker trucks when I hauled liquid chocolate. The tanker had coils throughout the walls and floor. The water was stored in a reservoir on the truck, passing the water through the engine to heat it up. 

Edited by Paul

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Woolf

Yes just as the drawing indicates

 

If you do not have a boiler in your house the extra heating if needed is by an electric heating element

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Paul

 

 

If you do not have a boiler in your house the extra heating if needed is by an electric heating element

 

I can imagine that could get costly, especially with Denmark's price per kWh.

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noddle

 

This is exactly what my brother uses,  except he has 2 tanks connected together, the heat exchange is in 1 tank only  ( it's all in his roof space )

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