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How do you cook your rice?


On-in-2

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Lacion Girl's finger method is exactly how my wife cooks the rice. But she won't use a rice cooker as she claims it doesn't taste the same. She likes the pot on the stove method which has cost us about 15 burnt and destroyed pots in our 24 years together when she forgets to turn it off. Don't use an aluminium rice pot as some research suggests aluminium cooking pots may be a cause of alzeimers disease.....I just can't remember where I read that.

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  • 3 months later...
Freedom Rider
Lacion Girl's finger method is exactly how my wife cooks the rice. But she won't use a rice cooker as she claims it doesn't taste the same. She likes the pot on the stove method which has cost us about 15 burnt and destroyed pots in our 24 years together when she forgets to turn it off. Don't use an aluminium rice pot as some research suggests aluminium cooking pots may be a cause of alzeimers disease.....I just can't remember where I read that.

:as-if:

 

I think I'll try that method

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  • 2 months later...
rainymike

The finger method is what I use. But you need to vary the amount of water depending on the type of rice that you cook with.

 

Plain white rice suits me fine, as long as I have something to eat it with. It's not so good all by itself in my opinion.

 

To add fiber to my diet, I now mix white and brown rice in equal portions. You get used to it.

 

When the rice is a day old, then you can make fried rice with it. I like to brown some diced vegetables and leftover meat in a skillet, then add the cooked old rice. Add a little soy sauce or oyster sauce or fish sauce to taste. Add some strips of fried egg as well. A little sugar if you prefer it sweet and a dash of vinegar for some acidity.

 

You can also use the fried rice as a stuffing to go inside calamari, fish, poultry, meats, and vegetables (like bell pepper).

 

Add the old rice to soups as well instead of wasting it. Goes great with chicken noodle or ox tail soup.

 

For a change of pace, put some green tea in a bowl of rice and eat with pickled vegetables/fish/meats.

 

In Hawaii, spam musubi is popular. Fry slices of spam with some soy sauce and sugar and spices to your taste. Place on top of a cube of rice. Wrap with dried seaweed. If you don't like spam, replace with a piece of chicken cooked the same way.

 

If you have steaming hot rice in a bowl, toss in a raw egg and a little sauce (whatever is available). Mix it up. Garnish with some sliced meat, green onions, or whatever you have available.

 

When I was young and had a hard time eating plain white rice, I used to mix my rice with a little mayo and ketchup and then eat with the rest of the meal.

 

For sushi, I go to a Japanese restaurant.

 

Rice and dried fish is pretty tasty if you don't fall into a rut. People dry, smoke, and preserve fish in a lot of interesting ways.

 

If you want simple, cook with chicken/beef/fish stock instead of water. Or cook with water but add some spice like curry or saffron and/or hot pepper. You can cook it with dried mushrooms/garlic as well.

 

Rice can be pretty good stuff if you get creative with it. I had to get creative because when I was younger, I had a hard time eating plain white rice.

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Caveat Emptor
Don't use an aluminium rice pot as some research suggests aluminium cooking pots may be a cause of alzeimers disease.....I just can't remember where I read that.

 

:welcome:

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sam12six

It's not really a rice recipe, per se, but my mom always used a rice cooker and stuck a couple of eggs into the rice before cooking. This way she always had a couple of boiled eggs to add to fried rice or whatever without going to the effort of boiling them separately.

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thebob

After living in Japan for many years, the rice here seems hard and bland. The ratio of water and rice is not enough, it is cooked too fast and not washed well enough.

 

In Japan rice is closely tied to the Shinto religion. The first rice is planted ceremonially by the Emperor and then planting season is officially open.

 

To cook rice.

 

First you must pick through your rice and remove any foreign matter and any discolored grains.

 

Then measure how many cups of rice you require.

 

Wash the rice 7 times, each time pouring as much of the water off as you can, washing involves scrubbing the rice together with your hands.

 

If after 7 washes, if the water is not clear, continue until it is.

 

For each cup of rice add 2 cups of water.

 

A heavy iron pot is used with a tight fitting lid. The water is brought to the boil and left to boil vigorously for one minute in the open pot.

 

The lid is placed on the pot and the heat is turned down very low, or if you are using solid fuel the pot is lifted very high.

 

The rice is cooked for 20 - 25 mins .

 

Never stir cooking rice or open the lid.

 

Once the rice has cooked, remove from the heat, and stir vigorously.

 

Replace the lid, wait 5 mins and serve.

 

Note in Japan rice with soy sauce is used as cat food! It is very amusing there to see foreigners put soy sauce on their rice!

 

My girlfriend and her family in Cebu say thet properly cooked rice should be browned and hard on the bottom. I strongly disagree!

Edited by thebob
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mikejwoodnz
It's not really a rice recipe, per se, but my mom always used a rice cooker and stuck a couple of eggs into the rice before cooking. This way she always had a couple of boiled eggs to add to fried rice or whatever without going to the effort of boiling them separately.

 

- now that is one good tip ! - :any-help:

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