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Pman

My Banca boat build thread.

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JamesMusslewhite

I love boat threads. I like seeing the traditional builders as they show the subtle variations of the boat designs around these islands. Cool project, looks solidly constructed and should give you years of dependable service. Thanks for the share and the photos.

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Pman

December 14th.

Paint is dry!

We moved it to my yard while he works on the outriggers and paddles.

 

post-1-0-06886500-1450172851_thumb.jpg
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Can I get a mod to rotate the first picture please? Don't know why my iPhone sometimes does that. Thank you !

 

EDIT: Okie dokie. All done.

 

Thank you Paul! Sorry for the trouble.

Edited by Pman
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Hy H

No doubt sea trials and maiden voyage before x-mas.

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shadow

December 7th

 

He's starting the upper deck/splash guard. Not sure what you call this.

 

A coaming, the splash guard thing is commonly called a coaming in sailboat terminology.

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Salty Dog

I love boat threads. I like seeing the traditional builders as they show the subtle variations of the boat designs around these islands. Cool project, looks solidly constructed and should give you years of dependable service. Thanks for the share and the photos.

 

Here is one I recently made.

 

blue-paper-boat.jpg

Edited by Salty Dog
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Oz Jon
Maybe something like this would help a bit. Snapped this at distance whiles out island hopping from Hinatuan last week.

 

I've wondered why you don't see more bancas with sails in the Phils?

Cheaper than motoring and longer range with less effort than paddling.

 

I don't think that I have ever seen one with a sail anywhere from northern Cebu or all the way down to Davao (via the East coast of Mindanao) or over to the North of Paloan.

 

Sails are common in other SE Asian countries.

 

Interesting that in the above photos they have a high boom on their sail.

That puts most of the sail area up high, increasing the overturning moment, particularly as they would mostly be reaching (sailing at right angles to the wind for non-sailors - Lol!).

I wonder why they do that? - that's opposite to the low, horizontal boom (Western configuration)

Edited by Oz Jon
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shadow

I've wondered why you don't see more bancas with sails in the Phils?

Cheaper than motoring and less effort than paddling.

 

I don't think that I have ever seen one with a sail anywhere from northern Cebu or all the way down to Davao (via the East coast of Mindanao) or over to the North of Paloan.

 

Sails are common in other SE Asian countries.

 

Interesting that in the above photos they have a high boom on their sail.

That puts most of the sail area up high, increasing the overturning moment, particularly as they would mostly be reaching (sailing at right angles to the wind for non-sailors - Lol!).

I wonder why they do that? - that's opposite to the low, horizontal boom (Western configuration)

That's the way they were doing it when Magellan was here, that's the way it is done. :snap:

 

Due to the design they are not something one would want to sail the Pacific on. My guess is they only use them here in calm areas. They are common in the Tanon Straight, the thin strip of water between Cebu and Negros. Only small ones though, about Pman's size. But yes, many use a rig just like that.

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Hy H
I don't think that I have ever seen one with a sail anywhere from northern Cebu or all the way down to Davao (via the East coast of Mindanao)

 

You have now John. These or this picture taken off Hinatuan.

 

Edit:   added location info link.

 

  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinatuan,_Surigao_del_Sur

Edited by Hy H
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thebob

 

 

They are common in the Tanon Straight, the thin strip of water between Cebu and Negros. Only small ones though, about Pman's size. But yes, many use a rig just like that.

 

Yes you see plenty in Moalboal. They aren't easy to handle either. The mast has 2 step positions one for each tack. When you jibe you you have to move the mast over and then in the same motion move your paddle to the other side of the hull as that is what you use for a rudder. They don't sail very close but they do go upwind in the right hands.

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Oz Jon

 

 

They are common in the Tanon Straight, the thin strip of water between Cebu and Negros

 

That makes good sense.

 

They aren't very seaworthy, so areas with relatively calm waters, not too much wind and not too far offshore is where they would be most at home.

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richard_ost

I asked about a sail and was told it just wasn't done on Banca boats. Guess that photo proves that wrong. Will look into possibilities.

 

You got many replies already, but I don't think anybody mentioned paraw. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraw

 

It's common in Panay (Iloilo and Aklan) island apparently, never been there and seen one myself.

 

5new-sailcanoe.jpg

 

The problem with Filipino sailing multihulls (like this) is that the bamboo outriggers don't have much volume (righting force) and you have to install those much further away from the main hull to get more righting momentum, even then you can't have that much sail area as normally multihulls have. Never been on one but you might think that sailing crosswind with these might be difficult, but really have no idea since never tried one.

 

As many replies indicate, it seems there are local differences around Visayas/Philippines. I've seen small monohulls (4-6 meters long) up in the north (where the seas are a bit rougher) with small sails and paddles, but never a banca with sails (yet).

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JamesMusslewhite

The Philippines has a small wooden paddle boat which uses a square colorful sail which is commonly used here in the waters around the big island of Mindanao. It is called a 'Vinta' (lepa-lepa or sakayan) and is more common around the waters of the Morolands.

regata-2.jpg

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thebob

You got many replies already, but I don't think anybody mentioned paraw. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraw

 

It's common in Panay (Iloilo and Aklan) island apparently, never been there and seen one myself.

The problem with Filipino sailing multihulls (like this) is that the bamboo outriggers don't have much volume (righting force) and you have to install those much further away from the main hull to get more righting momentum, even then you can't have that much sail area as normally multihulls have. Never been on one but you might think that sailing crosswind with these might be difficult, but really have no idea since never tried one.

 

Sailed a local paraw all the way round Boracay a few years back. In the right hands they go like the clappers. Very wet craft but lots of fun. You can solve the weight distribution problem with nets out to the amas and position crew where they are needed.

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Oz Jon

James said:-

"The Philippines has a small wooden paddle boat which uses a square colorful sail which is commonly used here in the waters around the big island of Mindanao. It is called a 'Vinta' (lepa-lepa or sakayan) and is more common around the waters of the Morolands."

.............................................

 

What a great photo James - thanks for that.

 

A lot of  work and art in those patchwork sails.

 

It looks like some kind of regatta or festive social event - I'd love to be sailing one of those, in that company.

 

Whereabouts are the Morolands?

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Salty Dog

Sailed a local paraw all the way round Boracay a few years back. In the right hands they go like the clappers. Very wet craft but lots of fun. You can solve the weight distribution problem with nets out to the amas and position crew where they are needed.

 

Clappers and amas.  :unknw:

 

Could you translate to American English... :biggrin_01:

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