Jump to content

First U.S. Flight of Fancy New Airbus A350 Jet Ends in Disaster


mactanfamily

Recommended Posts

mactanfamily

Journalists were asked to turn off their cameras and to stop tweeting......

 

#FAIL

 

The inaugural U.S. flight of one of Airbus’s newest aircraft models was supposed to be a big deal, showcasing the impressive new jumbo jet on its very first trip from New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport.

 
Instead, it was spectacularly terrifying and embarrassing fail. The high tech jet’s computer system aborted it’s own takeoff — because it deemed the runway too short.
 
Journalists and staff were among the passengers on the Airbus A350 for the chartered Qatar Airways flight that was supposed to travel 12 hours to Hamad International Airport.
 
The airplane even had screens on each seatback via which the passengers could watch the taxi and takeoff as it happened. Unfortunately, rather than watching the plane soar to 30,000 feet, it taxed, picked up speed — and then came to a startling and screeching halt.
 
According to The Points Guy Editor in Chief, Zach Honig, who was one 36 journalists and staff members on the charter flight, “About 18 seconds after we began rolling down JFK’s runway 22R, the aircraft self-aborted, bringing us from more than 100 mph to a loud, screeching halt in roughly 15 seconds.
 
“For a plane of this size and weight, stopping that quickly required a lot of force.” 
 
Though no one was injured, passengers on the flight were confused, and some were scared and upset and wanted to get off.
 
The flight crew told passengers to remains seated. They also told them to turn off their cameras and Honig was also asked to stop tweeting updates for his 9,600 followers, according to the Daily Mail.
 
Eventually the highest-ranking executive on the Airbus explained to the travlers there was no reason to fear for their safety. “For some reason the A350 decided that our 11,000-foot runway was too short to support the takeoff, and the plane applied the brakes at full force — all on its own,” writes Honig.
 
The New York based flight, which had arrived earlier from Doha, was meant to give Qatar Airways the ability to boast the first flight Airbus 350 flight to and out of the U.S., “a significant milestone in what’s quickly becoming one of Qatar’s fastest-growing markets,” says Honig. It also gave the airline the chance to one-up Delta on its home turf — the airline will be launching flights on the Airbus 350 in 2017 — and to show the goods off to journalists.
 
After the failed takeoff, and after a nearly two-hour delay, (and more than a few drinks for the passengers) the Qatar Airways Airbus 350 did takeoff and fly to Doha.
 
The Airbus 350 is set to begin service on from the U.S. on Qatar Airways on Jan. 1, 2016.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 44
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • colemanlee

    13

  • CaptRonn

    11

  • miles-high

    4

  • rizla

    4

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Typical media, I'd hardly call that a disaster.

It’s an Airbus for you…   On any Boeing airplanes, the computer(s) will warn you if the runway is not long enough, airplane overweight, not enough fuel, not configured for takeoff, and many other a

Thats always interesting to old pilots...why anyone would design an aircraft that would override the pilot is a mystery to me, you might as well be flying in a drone....or perhaps we should look at th

Posted Images

colemanlee

Thats always interesting to old pilots...why anyone would design an aircraft that would override the pilot is a mystery to me, you might as well be flying in a drone....or perhaps we should look at the way modern pilots are trained?

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Triple Diamond Sponsor
Monsoon

Typical media, I'd hardly call that a disaster.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The airplane even had screens on each seatback via which the passengers could watch the taxi and takeoff as it happened

 

Amazing.....what will they think of next.

Link to post
Share on other sites
mactanfamily

True, not a real disaster but as we know that's what "sells papers" or in today's world "gets clicks". i too thought it crashed when I read that. 

 

Regardless that is quite a blunder for a press junket. it took a few months for the dreamliner's batteries to burst into flames.

Link to post
Share on other sites
miles-high

why anyone would design an aircraft that would override the pilot is a mystery to me

Effing computers!

It’s an Airbus for you…

 

On any Boeing airplanes, the computer(s) will warn you if the runway is not long enough, airplane overweight, not enough fuel, not configured for takeoff, and many other abnormal/potentially dangerous conditions, etc. etc., but it will NEVER act on its own or override the pilots’ action…

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
colemanlee

It’s an Airbus for you…

 

On any Boeing airplanes, the computer(s) will warn you if the runway is not long enough, airplane overweight, not enough fuel, not configured for takeoff, and many other abnormal/potentially dangerous conditions, etc. etc., but it will NEVER act on its own or override the pilots’ action…

I suppose its the difference in European thinking and US thinking.....Europe needs a nanny aircraft.....US (for now) does not...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator
Salty Dog

I suppose its the difference in European thinking and US thinking.....Europe needs a nanny aircraft.....US (for now) does not...

 

 

What about the automatic carrier landing system (ACLS) and the automatic flight control system AFCS).

Link to post
Share on other sites
colemanlee

All of that can be overridden by the pilot, we also have flight directors, capable of taking the plane off and landing it completely hands off...but still can be overridden by pilot...thats what we are talking about....airbus you cant override it

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator
Dafey

Thats always interesting to old pilots...why anyone would design an aircraft that would override the pilot is a mystery to me, you might as well be flying in a drone....or perhaps we should look at the way modern pilots are trained?

 

Jets are for kids!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s an Airbus for you…

 

On any Boeing airplanes, the computer(s) will warn you if the runway is not long enough, airplane overweight, not enough fuel, not configured for takeoff, and many other abnormal/potentially dangerous conditions, etc. etc., but it will NEVER act on its own or override the pilots’ action…

So Miles, which Boeing are you flying?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Journalists were asked to turn off their cameras and to stop tweeting......

 

#FAIL

 

The inaugural U.S. flight of one of Airbus’s newest aircraft models was supposed to be a big deal, showcasing the impressive new jumbo jet on its very first trip from New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport.

 
Instead, it was spectacularly terrifying and embarrassing fail. The high tech jet’s computer system aborted it’s own takeoff — because it deemed the runway too short.
 
Journalists and staff were among the passengers on the Airbus A350 for the chartered Qatar Airways flight that was supposed to travel 12 hours to Hamad International Airport.
 
The airplane even had screens on each seatback via which the passengers could watch the taxi and takeoff as it happened. Unfortunately, rather than watching the plane soar to 30,000 feet, it taxed, picked up speed — and then came to a startling and screeching halt.
 
According to The Points Guy Editor in Chief, Zach Honig, who was one 36 journalists and staff members on the charter flight, “About 18 seconds after we began rolling down JFK’s runway 22R, the aircraft self-aborted, bringing us from more than 100 mph to a loud, screeching halt in roughly 15 seconds.
 
“For a plane of this size and weight, stopping that quickly required a lot of force.” 
 
Though no one was injured, passengers on the flight were confused, and some were scared and upset and wanted to get off.
 
The flight crew told passengers to remains seated. They also told them to turn off their cameras and Honig was also asked to stop tweeting updates for his 9,600 followers, according to the Daily Mail.
 
Eventually the highest-ranking executive on the Airbus explained to the travlers there was no reason to fear for their safety. “For some reason the A350 decided that our 11,000-foot runway was too short to support the takeoff, and the plane applied the brakes at full force — all on its own,” writes Honig.
 
The New York based flight, which had arrived earlier from Doha, was meant to give Qatar Airways the ability to boast the first flight Airbus 350 flight to and out of the U.S., “a significant milestone in what’s quickly becoming one of Qatar’s fastest-growing markets,” says Honig. It also gave the airline the chance to one-up Delta on its home turf — the airline will be launching flights on the Airbus 350 in 2017 — and to show the goods off to journalists.
 
After the failed takeoff, and after a nearly two-hour delay, (and more than a few drinks for the passengers) the Qatar Airways Airbus 350 did takeoff and fly to Doha.
 
The Airbus 350 is set to begin service on from the U.S. on Qatar Airways on Jan. 1, 2016.

 

 

 OK, now for the reality.  The airplane did not abort the takeoff, the crew did.  That's right, the CREW did the abort. 

 

 Piss poor journalism.  "The high tech jet’s computer system aborted it’s own takeoff — because it deemed the runway too short."

 

Uh, no. The A350 can't do that. However, the crew had an alert via ECAM (Electronic Centralised Aircraft Monitor) alerted the crew of a situation, the crew decided to abort the takeoff. Here's where the "high tech jet's computer system" aborted the takeoff:  When the crew moved the thrust levers to idle the autobrakes engaged, the auto spoilers deployed bringing the plane to a stop.  That's it.  Just like on a Boeing.

 

The FMS (Flight Management System) is programmed before departure with the aircraft information, departure information and route.  For whatever reason, the FMS assumed the runway was not long enough (intersection takeoff?) and it flagged on the ECAM.

Thats always interesting to old pilots...why anyone would design an aircraft that would override the pilot is a mystery to me, you might as well be flying in a drone....or perhaps we should look at the way modern pilots are trained?

 

It didn't.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

All of that can be overridden by the pilot, we also have flight directors, capable of taking the plane off and landing it completely hands off...but still can be overridden by pilot...thats what we are talking about....airbus you cant override it

 

 What "Flight Director" will perform a take off or landing on an airplane???

 

 The flight director computes and displays the proper pitch and bank angles required for the aircraft to follow a selected path. The Flight Director is separate from the autopilot, but can give commands to the pilot or the autopilot.

 

 I have yet to see an autopilot that will do a complete takeoff from start of roll through 1st segment climb. The pilot must engage the autothrust, steer the plane down the runway (manually), rotate and retract the landing gear. The pilot also must retract the flaps and set climb thrust.  

 

 Autoland still requires the pilot to lower the landing gear and lower the flaps manually, so it too is not completely hands off. 

Edited by CaptRonn
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
colemanlee

WoW cool we have an expert....most folks when they talk about that take that stuff for granted...seems you cant grasp that...just wondering how much time you have in a KC130 you seem to have a lot more experience than anyone here...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...