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Paul

NOSOCALPINOY: A response to your quote, regarding clean water.

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Paul

The Nippon Poly Glu can not DIY without building the apparatus. The point of the video clip was, can anyone here build something like that that saves thousands of lives or even millions of children in remote poor countries with safe drinking water for free and or at discount prices for the product? It's truly an amazing product just made from soy beans IMHO.

Besides, the OP was about "Making Clean Water" and video clip showed river and or sewage water that people from poor countries were drinking! That in it's self is truly an accomplishment by the Japanese inventor/philanthropist in the video.

 

Art, I am talking with a lady now, who has her own (small) NGO, here in Cambodia. She wants to try to get water filters to those who do not have clean water available to them, here in Cambodia.

 

Biosand filters can be built for about $12 USD, each. I hope this works out, so we can help even a few people. I mean, everyone deserves clean water to drink, for Pete's sake.

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Paul

I learned that the second stage in Mr. Oda's water processing system, basically, was the same as a Biosand Filter, sand and stones. Well, part of it, anyway.

 

Less than $1,000 USD, to filter and provide water for 1,500 people.

NIPPON POLY GLU (1).jpg

 

Stage 1: The upper tank is filled with river water. 

NIPPON POLY GLU (2).jpg

 

Stage 2: Mr. Oda's solution is added at this stage, to clean the water.

NIPPON POLY GLU (3).jpg

 

Stage 3: The water and impurities are separated, using sand, rocks and stones.

NIPPON POLY GLU (4).jpg

 

Stage 4: The last tank adds chlorine to the water.

NIPPON POLY GLU (5).jpg

 

 


Definitely a great video find, you posted.

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RogerDat

In the 1970's in Thailand we were warned about rain water harvesting tanks that were GI and had lead soldering at the seams.

Hope U don't have same problem with the drums they had,  our city water system used BIG in ground sand filters to pre treat river water.

Edited by RogerDat

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Paul

 

 

Hope U don't have same problem with the drums they had

 

No problems here in Cambodia. For those who can afford them, they buy the large polyethylene water tanks. Locally, you can buy a 10,000 liters (2,641 US Gallons) capacity tank for about $700 USD (~32,900 Php).

 

For those who can't afford tanks, buy the (considerably) cheaper water jars:

 

 

The ones in the video are smaller - about 400 liters each. But, they have 1,200 liter tanks you can buy for about $16.00 USD, each.

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