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New Boat Build Project - (Totally Rebuilding an Older Boat)


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JamesMusslewhite

The bow and stern boards are then notched out with a chisel so the top rails can finally be pulled up to make them curve. This is more for practicality that for looks as it actually helps when cutting through waves when the sea gets rough which can happen at a drop of a hat when out in open water. Rain bands are common and what was a calm sunny day can quickly become windy, wet and nasty with serious chopping waves. That little curve can make all the difference of climbing a wave or having the bow or stern pushed down by the force as it is like a curved tip of a slicing blade. 

 

Bow board

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The bow board now has the beginning shape carved.

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The Stern board

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Stern board after top rails, middle rails, pipe and propeller shaft installed. The top of the stern board has the beginning shape carved. 

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Now need to install propeller pipe. shaft and propeller, motor mounts and install the motor.

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For the last two weeks the 'Arthur 1' has been receiving an upgrade. The old 8.5hp engine has now been replaced with an 18Hp engine.This required the installation of a heavier shaft and replacing the

The location is a nice little secluded strip of pebbled beach that seems to have a large shallow waterfront area which will be ideal for the small children of the family to run, play and splash about

I have owned six boats over the 7 years we have lived here in the Surigao. One of the advantages of living here in the Surigao City area is boating, with great fishing and so many small islands around

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JamesMusslewhite

Now installing the propeller pipe. shaft and propeller, motor mounts and motor on this project is pretty easy as the hull board was already carved and set up already. First the pipe must be installed and epoxied in. It should be noted that these tasks be completed before you put on the plywood skin so you will have room to work, if not that you will wish that you had due to the tight space. First the pipe that will be used for the propeller shaft.

 

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This needs to be done first so you can adjust the motor location for the mounts to the shaft length. The motor can be easily adjusted were as the shaft and propeller does not adjust well to the motor location. Now to locate the motor and mark were the motor mounts will be located

 

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Then you only need to mount the motor and the universal fitting to the end of the shaft. I can assume everyone now understands why it is best to do this before epoxying and nailing the plywood sides.

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now at this point it is time to add the boards on top of the top rail were the bamboo outriggers will be. This boat will use three outriggers which will hold and support the floating bamboo wings on both sides of the boat. I did not include the following information earlier because it could have been confusing. When we designed the boat we figured how many and where each out rigger would be located. Since we will be using 3 out riggers we properly spaced 3 extra large ribs to add as proper support for these 3 outriggers. These boards that will be added to the top rail will support the weight and act a place to secure the outriggers to the deck of the boat.

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JamesMusslewhite

Now we add the support board for the three outriggers to the top of the side rails.

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more to add later as the project progresses.

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Scotsbloke

Nice thread James

Agreed.

 

How much of the original boat will remain, James?

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Bill H

James have you found or looked for a source of stuffing boxes for your shaft?

 

For fun put on your dive mask and go out and watch any of these banca's with long prop shafts and see how much oscillation there is in the shaft when the prop is under power.  Struts would not be hard to do and would eliminate a lot of fatigue in the shaft and prop.

 

If you have any doubts about your plywood, do a boil test.  Cut some scrap plywood into 4" squares (give or take) and boil them in sea water.  Time the boiling and see how long it takes the squares to delaminate.  Quality plywood will go beyond 72 hours, most of the locally available ply fails in 1-2 hours.  Boiling simulates the aging process, it's a very good test and easy to do.

 

​I laminated my bottoms out of plywood 1.5" thick (but there would be no reason you could not make them much thicker if you wished).  They were very light and very rigid.  They worked well for me and would take a harder beating than planks.  They were also more resistant to marine borers.

 

Clear epoxy will give you a stronger bond than the gray epoxy you are using.  It is gray because it has had (usually) talcum powder (or a similar bulk agent) added to it as a thickening agent.  For bonding purposes, the clear epoxy is much stronger.  It comes in two varieties, thin and thick.  The thin is for laminating and is a little lighter than fresh cream.  The thick is more viscus just a bit thinner than the old STP Oil Treatment if you remember that stuff).  The thick is for structural bonds and very strong.  Neither has filler in it which weakens the bond.  Big Sky Graphics in Cebu can supply you with both.  They sell it by weight not volume, so you don't order a liter you order a kilo, etc.  They also sell glass cloth and foam mats if you are so inclined.

 

​If you opt for epoxy paint, Atlantic Hardware sells the best and most cost effective that I've found.  It tends to last much longer than the alkyd enamels, but it is a little more expensive.  They sell an epoxy primer which is very good undercoat.  I've had very good luck with their paints and like them much more than the traditional marine paints you will find at your local hardware store.  I was very unhappy with both the Pioneer and Cord anti fouling paints I tried (and epoxy paints for that matter).  Both were very thin (water like) and fared no well that regular enamels.   The Japanese anti-fouling paints seem to work better, but I have not tried their epoxy paints.

 

Best of luck to you on your project.  Nothing is so satisfying as messing around with boats!

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JamesMusslewhite

Agreed.

 

How much of the original boat will remain, James?

Just the solid hull board is original, everything else is all new. 

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JamesMusslewhite

James have you found or looked for a source of stuffing boxes for your shaft?

 

For fun put on your dive mask and go out and watch any of these banca's with long prop shafts and see how much oscillation there is in the shaft when the prop is under power.  Struts would not be hard to do and would eliminate a lot of fatigue in the shaft and prop.

 

If you have any doubts about your plywood, do a boil test.  Cut some scrap plywood into 4" squares (give or take) and boil them in sea water.  Time the boiling and see how long it takes the squares to delaminate.  Quality plywood will go beyond 72 hours, most of the locally available ply fails in 1-2 hours.  Boiling simulates the aging process, it's a very good test and easy to do.

 

​I laminated my bottoms out of plywood 1.5" thick (but there would be no reason you could not make them much thicker if you wished).  They were very light and very rigid.  They worked well for me and would take a harder beating than planks.  They were also more resistant to marine borers.

 

Clear epoxy will give you a stronger bond than the gray epoxy you are using.  It is gray because it has had (usually) talcum powder (or a similar bulk agent) added to it as a thickening agent.  For bonding purposes, the clear epoxy is much stronger.  It comes in two varieties, thin and thick.  The thin is for laminating and is a little lighter than fresh cream.  The thick is more viscus just a bit thinner than the old STP Oil Treatment if you remember that stuff).  The thick is for structural bonds and very strong.  Neither has filler in it which weakens the bond.  Big Sky Graphics in Cebu can supply you with both.  They sell it by weight not volume, so you don't order a liter you order a kilo, etc.  They also sell glass cloth and foam mats if you are so inclined.

 

​If you opt for epoxy paint, Atlantic Hardware sells the best and most cost effective that I've found.  It tends to last much longer than the alkyd enamels, but it is a little more expensive.  They sell an epoxy primer which is very good undercoat.  I've had very good luck with their paints and like them much more than the traditional marine paints you will find at your local hardware store.  I was very unhappy with both the Pioneer and Cord anti fouling paints I tried (and epoxy paints for that matter).  Both were very thin (water like) and fared no well that regular enamels.   The Japanese anti-fouling paints seem to work better, but I have not tried their epoxy paints.

 

Best of luck to you on your project.  Nothing is so satisfying as messing around with boats!

 

I plan on using a stuffing box when I get the new motor and will probably change out the shaft and prop as well. We are only going with this prop setup so we can get the boat in the water so I can use it for the mariculture projects. When I switch out the motor I will remove the pipe and convert it all over.

 

I plan on applying two coats of clear apology on both the inside (thick) and the outside (thin) before I put on the epoxy primer coat. If I can not get the epoxy base paint here than I will probably go with a quality enamel pain. I have two issues which is cost as well as time as by the 3rd week of December the sky falls till April. We have a heavy rainy season here on Dinagat Island and all the paint needs to be on before it hits. I really do not have the time or the money to be traveling up to Cebu right now. Later I can dry dock the boat next summer and give it a light sanding and then apply a better paint when I am switching out the motor and the shaft.

 

I can get quality Grade #1 marine plywood in a shop here in Surigao City and will be going over to the City this Saturday to pick up 5 sheets. We will start cutting the plywood next week. With luck we will be painting by the first of the month. Surigao City is a good place to find quality boat related building materials because there is a strong boat culture here and so many fishing villages scattered throughout these little islands. Surigao City is a major shopping hub for all the surrounding islands and most townships have daily pumpboat services running to and from the city.

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samatm

Thank YOU sir!   very informative thread.  I really had no idea how all these Bancas were put together.      I would like to see some information on what to look for when purchasing a second hand boat.

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Bill H

Jetski motor and propulsion system would be interesting

 

Only if you were not the one buying the gasoline!  Those puppies be VERY thirsty!

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Headshot

I plan on applying two coats of clear apology

 

Clear what??? Apology? What is that?

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woodchopper

i did see 2ft sq marine ply 4 sale here local,,that might limit your spacings tho?

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Oz Jon

You are on the right track using epoxy for gluing and (very important for long life) soaking all timber, all over, with a couple of epoxy soak-coats to seal it.

 

The best final paint coat is acrylic over epoxy primer - very durable, hard, watertight, UV resistant finish.

 

When you get the inevitable damage to the outer skin from collisions, etc, you need to dry out the damaged timber and re seal with soak epoxy and re-paint without delay - got to keep that timber dry and the termites out!

 

You mentioned the difficulty of getting long lengths of timber for the stringers, etc. You can solve this problem by epoxy laminating-up strips of thinner material to get the thickness you want and butting strips (with staggered joints) to get the length you want.

 

This makes a stronger stringer than a one-piece solid length and has another advantage - you can build curve/twist into it, if you wish, as you laminate it up.

 

Thanks for the thread, very interesting!

Edited by Oz Jon
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