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Need help for our son learning Tagalog and native Visayan


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Because we're here either for semi-retirement or adventurous business, but children aren't?

 

The world is much bigger than just one country. Wouldn't it be better to prepare them for the outside world? If they could learn Filipino, they could use the same time and effort to learn Spanish or Chinese instead. Or classic literature, or horsemanship.

 

My daughter knows English, Bisayan (Cebuano) and Tagalog (as well as a normal 4-year-old knows anything), and she is learning Mandarin in school at SHS Ateneo. I don't think that learning one language precludes learning another. Rather, it is easier to learn new languages when you already speak multiple languages. She switches between languages easily, and seems to know when each language is appropriate. It is, however, much more difficult to learn new languages when you are older...if you haven't learned a new language for a long time. The brain has problems making the necessary connections. I have tried to learn Bisayan, but I forget it faster than I learn it.

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We only speak English at home and we used to take our daughter to a private non-international school. Unfortunately, nearly all subjects were taught in Cebuano... including Filipino (even though the P

I wouldn't worry about it to much. At that age his mid is like a sponge. He will pick it up from his classmates and friends in school. Me wife's niece just went to the U.S. with her son who is in t

We just moved here and  he is going to private school close by but doesn't speak the 2 languages.   His English is excellent, so I guess everybody is kind of jealous, he speaks like an English profe

arentol

We only speak English at home and we used to take our daughter to a private non-international school. Unfortunately, nearly all subjects were taught in Cebuano... including Filipino (even though the Principal told us differently when we enrolled her). So that didn't work out too well because she couldn't understand a word of what everyone was saying.

 

We then moved to the city and enrolled her in an international school. Everything is taught in English, including Filipino. This has made a huge difference for us. The use of English as a basis for communication enabled her to learn the Filipino language very quickly... she now gets perfect scores and is the one teaching me Filipino words.

 

Anyways, that's my experience. A good school really helps a lot and has benefited all of our lives tremendously.

 

 

Aren

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We then moved to the city and enrolled her in an international school. Everything is taught in English, including Filipino. This has made a huge difference for us. The use of English as a basis for communication enabled her to learn the Filipino language very quickly... she now gets perfect scores and is the one teaching me Filipino words.

 

SHS Ateneo de Cebu also teaches all classes in English (except her Mandarin Chinese class obviously). I like the fact that I can observe her in the classroom, so I know what she is being taught. She gets plenty of Bisayan (Cebuano) in our home and from relatives and friends. When I am part of the conversation, she always speaks English (even to my wife), but speaks Bisayan when I'm not part of the conversation. She has learned most of her Tagalog from TV (just like most every other Filipino).

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SkyMan

You're going to have a very hard time finding a decent Visayan teacher here.  The locals are not actually taught the language, they just pick it up and go by what they hear.  They don't know why they say something one way and not another.  It just 'sounds' right.

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Monsoon

 

 

The language comes from home.

 

Yes and no. I moved to a region of the US with a very distinct accent when I was 5 and I had it very thick as a kid, and still have a touch of it today. Neither of my parents have this accent. 

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Salty Dog

Yes and no. I moved to a region of the US with a very distinct accent when I was 5 and I had it very thick as a kid, and still have a touch of it today. Neither of my parents have this accent. 

 

 

There us to be a guy on my ship that picked up accents in just a few days in a port and didn't lose it for several weeks.

 

Everyone thought he was faking it and maybe he was, but he was damn good at it then.

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