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Need help for our son learning Tagalog and native Visayan


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rainymike

To help the kids in Tagalog, we've used a variety of tutors with mixed success. These include teachers (who tutor a group of students at the end of the day), teachers who'd come to our house after class for private lessons, tutoring schools (mostly homework help), and hiring high school graduates (our current tutor).

 

I also get involved in the practice by having the kids read text on the internet in both English/Tagalog and writing responses to what they've read. Only about 15-20 minutes of work, but they must do it daily. I tend to believe that kids acquire language best by reading and writing (even with errors) regularly - rather than learning a bunch of rules that no one except English teachers can remember.

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We only speak English at home and we used to take our daughter to a private non-international school. Unfortunately, nearly all subjects were taught in Cebuano... including Filipino (even though the P

I wouldn't worry about it to much. At that age his mid is like a sponge. He will pick it up from his classmates and friends in school. Me wife's niece just went to the U.S. with her son who is in t

We just moved here and  he is going to private school close by but doesn't speak the 2 languages.   His English is excellent, so I guess everybody is kind of jealous, he speaks like an English profe

Scotsbloke

Rainy.....what ages are your kids.  My three are bilingual in English and Swedish (with a minor in Scots) and we are friends with other bilingual and trilingual families.

 

Kids have an amazing capacity for language acquisition.

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cebulover2000

There are only a a few (maybe only one) school in Cebu which English is the only language tought and we don't want him to go there (money is no issue, lol, I wish).

 

Most parenst here are concerned about them learning English, this is no issue here, but the kids are having Filipino and in most schools Bisayan up to grade 3. Since he will be grade 4 nest year, that won't be an issue, he will just learn it on the street.

 

Filipino (Tagalog) however is an official subject and if you won't pass it, you will not pass your grade. Kind of hard when you only have it as  new subject but the rest is in English and missed the first 3 years.

 

For now things seem to settle, we found a teacher on the weekends and the school is cooperating.

 

 

Other schools, like Ateneo don't allow him to sit in and catch up. he would have to pass ALL subjects in October in order to be accepted for next school year. Strict rules for a good school? Maybe some may think that but I think that this kind of rules lowers the level of Ateneo if they can't think outside their own little box. Did somebody say typical Filipino? Or maybe it's because he wouldn't pay the foreigner tax? Who knows. Money is always an issue as we all know. Not accussing anybody, just putting it up for discussion.

 

 

However, with all that craze going on in Kindergarden and Elementary school these days, I know many people (including myself, my wife and my oldest son) who did just very fine with public school attendance. School is not a race, it's a marathon and many have short breath.

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Irenicus

 

 

What advantage could it possibly offer to him at all to speak like locals??

 

Oh, man - the entire country changes if you are able to speak the local language.  Headshot mentioned Bud Brown - walking around with him in his neighborhood, you REALLY see the advantage of knowing the language - the level of real immersion in the community increases by about 300 percent.  

 

If you are going to live here long term, why wouldn't you want to learn the language?  It's not that hard, there are free guides online, and it kinds of breaks the ice with new people you meet when you are butchering their language.

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There are only a a few (maybe only one) school in Cebu which English is the only language tought and we don't want him to go there (money is no issue, lol, I wish).

 

Most parenst here are concerned about them learning English, this is no issue here, but the kids are having Filipino and in most schools Bisayan up to grade 3. Since he will be grade 4 nest year, that won't be an issue, he will just learn it on the street.

 

Filipino (Tagalog) however is an official subject and if you won't pass it, you will not pass your grade. Kind of hard when you only have it as  new subject but the rest is in English and missed the first 3 years.

 

For now things seem to settle, we found a teacher on the weekends and the school is cooperating.

 

 

Other schools, like Ateneo don't allow him to sit in and catch up. he would have to pass ALL subjects in October in order to be accepted for next school year. Strict rules for a good school? Maybe some may think that but I think that this kind of rules lowers the level of Ateneo if they can't think outside their own little box. Did somebody say typical Filipino? Or maybe it's because he wouldn't pay the foreigner tax? Who knows. Money is always an issue as we all know. Not accussing anybody, just putting it up for discussion.

 

 

However, with all that craze going on in Kindergarden and Elementary school these days, I know many people (including myself, my wife and my oldest son) who did just very fine with public school attendance. School is not a race, it's a marathon and many have short breath.

All of my children struggle with Filipino. In fact, many times they have failed exams......or more correctly, did not get a passing score. However, they ended up with a passing grade for the school year. That is because of how the teachers grade the students. It is very common to have the kids be assigned to groups and do some sort of skit involving a story with each child doing some dialogue......but not always. Sometimes students will do a walk on role with no dialogue.......go figure?

 

As well, there will be written assignments. For example, some boring old story will be assigned to read. The kids will then write a report, in Filipino, describing the story. This is so common, there are websites to use for assistance. Many students get others who do know Filipino to ”assist". Result, a passing grade.

 

Many of the teachers themselves have a hard time with Filipino. There seems to be an acceptance that in the visayan (at least in my area) the use of Filipino is a requirement that teachers will be very slack on grading. In effect, students pass who should not. My children cannot watch a news show or a movie with Tagalog and understand it. One of them is in college now.

 

With regard to the rules for entering a specified grade, it can be very cumbersome. There are students who are unable to enroll at the appropriate age, so they don't go to school for several years. Then, when they are as old as ten, try to enroll and are told they have to go to kindergarten classes before they can be admitted. Makes no sense, but rules is rules.

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cebulover2000

Yeah, I am glad we found an understanding and excellent school within our vicinity.

 

One more question. Does anybody know if you can enroll in college or university here with a foreign (Canadian) high school degree and pay local rates?

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Yeah, I am glad we found an understanding and excellent school within our vicinity.

 

One more question. Does anybody know if you can enroll in college or university here with a foreign (Canadian) high school degree and pay local rates?

I believe there is commonly additional costs for foreign students at colleges. From what I have learned, these vary a lot. The concept (accurate or not) is that there are some costs subsidized by the government for Filipinos, so foreigner's need to pay a share. They vary according to their immigration status.

 

However, your question did not make clear of the enrollee was a foreigner or not. There are many Filipino students who earn their high school degrees while overseas. Hence, they are not foreign for enrollment purposes.

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rainymike

 

 

.what ages are your kids.  My three are bilingual in English and Swedish (with a minor in Scots) and we are friends with other bilingual and trilingual families.

 

Kids are 4, 6, 8, 10. The two youngest speak English quite well. The older two are most comfortable with Cebuano. But I agree, the kids speak English, Cebuano and Tagalog without too much effort. Learning the rules of grammar and proper spelling etc. takes a little bit more effort. 

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Oh, man - the entire country changes if you are able to speak the local language.  Headshot mentioned Bud Brown - walking around with him in his neighborhood, you REALLY see the advantage of knowing the language - the level of real immersion in the community increases by about 300 percent.  

 

If you are going to live here long term, why wouldn't you want to learn the language?  It's not that hard, there are free guides online, and it kinds of breaks the ice with new people you meet when you are butchering their language.

 

Because we're here either for semi-retirement or adventurous business, but children aren't?

 

The world is much bigger than just one country. Wouldn't it be better to prepare them for the outside world? If they could learn Filipino, they could use the same time and effort to learn Spanish or Chinese instead. Or classic literature, or horsemanship.

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Because we're here either for semi-retirement or adventurous business, but children aren't?

 

The world is much bigger than just one country. Wouldn't it be better to prepare them for the outside world? If they could learn Filipino, they could use the same time and effort to learn Spanish or Chinese instead. Or classic literature, or horsemanship.

 

 

Horsemanship? How about Croquet?

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Monsoon

We just moved here and  he is going to private school close by but doesn't speak the 2 languages.

 

His English is excellent, so I guess everybody is kind of jealous, he speaks like an English professor with Canadian accent and does everything to avoid learning the languages. The school is offering support but I think it would be better to get ahead.

 

Does somebody know a teacher they recommend, I mean somebody who is involved and has the interest of the child (almost 8yo boy, grade 3) in mind. We tried some teachers but they either show up late or don't show up at all. Even my Filipina wife can't handle that.

 

Location is Consolacion,

 

As already mentioned, don't sweat it too much. 

 

I know a lot of expats with kids here, and a lot of Filipino families who speak primarily English at home. All of their kids struggle with their Tagalog classes, and invariably it seems to be their worst subject. 

 

Just do what is appropriate according to local custom and buy your kid a passing grade. learning a language has to be from desire or necessity. If a person has neither, and having a lot of the former helps, then they will struggle to learn. 

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colemanlee

In our house, we speak English, I scold them if they do not...but when they are playing and interdicting with the local populace they speak either Waray or Tagalog...as they come in contact with more of the local populace they will pick up the local language...I would not worry...and speaking English will only help them...  

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mactanfamily

Dont worry about it.

The language comes from home. NO ONE can learn a language fully at school without immersing and speaking it outside of the classroom. Saying that, I think its far more important that they know and speak english best for their future.You are ahead of the game. My daughter had a little trouble with tagalog, but at our house spoke english, visayan, and even illocano to her grandparents. On top of that she taught herself japanese becuase she was obsessed with anime. My son he understands visayan but doesnt speak anything but english. At 11 yo he can reassemble a 327 chevy from parts. 

 

Guide them but dont sweat it like so many parents do today. Our kids are so far ahead of locals, but in reality most of them leave to earn just like the locals dream of. 

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Most be quite a culture shock for an 8 year old. Does he find the experience fun or frightening?

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