Jump to content

Need help for our son learning Tagalog and native Visayan


Recommended Posts

cebulover2000

We just moved here and  he is going to private school close by but doesn't speak the 2 languages.

 

His English is excellent, so I guess everybody is kind of jealous, he speaks like an English professor with Canadian accent and does everything to avoid learning the languages. The school is offering support but I think it would be better to get ahead.

 

Does somebody know a teacher they recommend, I mean somebody who is involved and has the interest of the child (almost 8yo boy, grade 3) in mind. We tried some teachers but they either show up late or don't show up at all. Even my Filipina wife can't handle that.

 

Location is Consolacion,

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 35
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • cebulover2000

    7

  • Headshot

    4

  • Jawny

    4

  • Monsoon

    2

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

We only speak English at home and we used to take our daughter to a private non-international school. Unfortunately, nearly all subjects were taught in Cebuano... including Filipino (even though the P

I wouldn't worry about it to much. At that age his mid is like a sponge. He will pick it up from his classmates and friends in school. Me wife's niece just went to the U.S. with her son who is in t

We just moved here and  he is going to private school close by but doesn't speak the 2 languages.   His English is excellent, so I guess everybody is kind of jealous, he speaks like an English profe

woodchopper

i dont know if this is any help,,but i have a mate who has a "phils to english app" on his smartfone.

 

he says the fone records and then later translates to english.

 

i could ask him more 4 u?

 

i am not smartfone savvy and hate charging every coupla hours

Link to post
Share on other sites
Alfred E. Neuman

There was a new member who clandestinely advertised language teaching last week. Perhaps someone can fill me in..

Link to post
Share on other sites
cebulover2000

That would probably good for me, lol - but I doubt they allow it at school.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soarking

I wouldn't worry about it to much. At that age his mid is like a sponge. He will pick it up from his classmates and friends in school.

Me wife's niece just went to the U.S. with her son who is in the second grade. Been there 8 months and only in school one month and he picked up English almost perfect.

The ones that are going to benefit the most will be your sons classmates and friends who will learn better English from him than from the teachers.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
KennyF

I have a buddy who moved his family from Thailand to France. The 7 year old, who spoke only Thai and English was enrolled in a regular school and was speaking French within a month.

 

KonC

Link to post
Share on other sites
cebulover2000

The problem here is that they are only allowed to speak English at school, except the language subjects.

Link to post
Share on other sites
KennyF

I think that maybe you're over thinking it.

When my family migrated to Australia in 1952 I started grade one at 5 years old.

That class was like united nations.

But we all got on.

 

That said, our kids teacher here on Camiguin offers one on one tuition at 200 p per hour.

Maybe you can find the same.

 

KonC

Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Bud Brown, one of our LinC Forums members, wrote an online Cebuano course called "Essential Cebuano." He is a paid advertiser here on LinC Forums. If your boy is computer savvy, he will pick it up quickly using the course. It teaches conversational Cebuano, so it is easy for children to learn. The advertisements come up on the top of the page from time-to-time, but you have to be watching to get it that way. Here is the URL...

 

http://essentialcebuano.com/  

 

In addition to that, you can get a maid/yaya who only speaks Cebuano and maybe Tagalog to help your son in his daily life, and make sure he has an opportunity to have lots of friends (playmates) his age, so he can socialize (play) with them daily after school. Immersion is the best method for learning new languages. If he is exposed enough, he will learn.

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

There was a new member who clandestinely advertised language teaching last week. Perhaps someone can fill me in..

 

Not unless you want somebody to get banned for advertising without permission... 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soarking

The problem here is that they are only allowed to speak English at school, except the language subjects.

Have you heard the English the teachers speak in school? Probably not what you would call proper English.

And at that age as long as he hangs around his classmates and friends they will learn from each other. I would give it a month or two and see what he picks up in that amount of time. The problem may not be his ability to learn / speak Tagalog or Cubano, how about yourself?

Edited by Soarking
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
cebulover2000

We have family and yaya around who only speak Visayan. My request is the school related knowledge, especially Filipino (Tagalog), not just the ability to speak. Hence looking for a teacher. He has to catch up with it, they learn it from Kindergarten onwards. Of course one of the problems is also the different time the school year starts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is any comfort, my children are in high school and one is in college. They have never been able to speak or read Tagalog adequately. Nor do their teachers. They get by using homework assignments (done by others), by joining in group skits ( with others doing most of the talking) and by memorizing the stories or poems they have to read in class.

 

It is common to get someone to tutor the children, but they have to be good in understanding Tagalog themselves. Usually a college student, needing some extra income is available.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

The problem here is that they are only allowed to speak English at school, except the language subjects.

Which sounds great and the school is certainly in the right direction.

 

 

Why do you want him to learn their local languages? Their language of law is English. Their language of math and engineering and science or just everything about higher education is also the English, and only English. What advantage could it possibly offer to him at all to speak like locals??

Link to post
Share on other sites

Which sounds great and the school is certainly in the right direction.

Why do you want him to learn their local languages? Their language of law is English. Their language of math and engineering and science or just everything about higher education is also the English, and only English. What advantage could it possibly offer to him at all to speak like locals??

You might want to check this out more closely. Schools are using the local dialect (mother tongue) to teach, even with textbooks being produced in the same. The intent was to make it easier for the students to understand lessons. So, in the visayas, a student will speak in visayan, learn English and Tagalog and get subject matter lessons in visayan.

 

You may think a rule of only speaking in English is great. However, to enforce this, some schools penalize or shame students who use dialect. They quickly learn to avoid the problem.....don't speak. Ends up the rule looks good on paper but not in practice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...