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Quality of Philippines college/university?


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I would agree with much of the sentiment in this post however the quality of study/training for those in the medical field is good and so are some of the universities that offer various medical degrees.

 

My wife graduated with a degree in physical therapy from a small college in Mindanao and when she was having her transcripts reviewed in the US for licensing she was told she was equal or exceeded in all the categories.

 

My oldest is studying to be a doctor at Cebu Doctors University and that is a good school and has students from other countries as well.

 

So if your looking for talent try the various medical universities as many who graduate will not find work in their field but will have a solid college degree with good math and English skills.

Edited by JohnD
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Have a friend here that hires for the airlines, when he does he has two piles of applications, UP in one, everybody else in the other...if he cant get what he needs from the UP pile he might move to t

What is the difference between graduate and non graduate Pinoys? You can play scrabble with the graduates.

U.P. is the only real University.

I would agree with much of the sentiment in this post however the quality of study/training for those in the medical field is good and so are some of the universities that offer various medical degrees.

 

My wife graduated with a degree in physical therapy from a small college in Mindanao and when she was having her transcripts reviewed in the US for licensing she was told she was equal or exceeded in all the categories.

 

My oldest is studying to be a doctor at Cebu Doctors University and that is a good school and has students from other countries as well.

 

So if your looking for talent try the various medical universities as many who graduate will not find work in their field but will have a solid college degree with good math and English skills.

I have a child attending CDU as an undergraduate. The English instruction is very poorly conducted and on a good day, at the high school level. The instructor fails to attend classes or is often late which tells me there is little oversight of the staff. The exams are so poorly prepared that the students have a hard time just reading the questions since they use very poor quality reproduction methods. My child's entire group had to have an exam repeated since the questions were on a grammatical correction technique the I instructor failed to teach or give them guidance to learn.

 

The algebra instruction is just barebones do your lessons, complete the exams. No real instruction. In fact, on several occasions the instructor had to start a lesson over three times when he got confused while teaching. It's more like he has been assigned the class without being qualified himself.

 

The chemistry laboratory is using outdated techniques and even exposing the students to harmful materials without any instruction on safe hand handling or first aid. Once again, the instructor has had to start a lesson over when he got confused while teaching.

 

The PE class requires the students to learn a dance, but they are graded on whether they "look good while dancing". My child was marked down for not enough "booty shaking".

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Who said Smokey's four were average? There is also the problem of lack of opportunities for many of these youngsters.

 

It seems to me that your major prerequisite requirement is an ability to read and comprehend the English language.I agree that many graduates of institutions all over the Philippines will have trouble with that, but not all of them. It also looks like that basic requirement, though, is not enough. 

 

If the work is revenue generating and requires English comprehension, why not recruit in countries where English is the first language? If you are recruiting in the Philippines in order to take advantage of the (apparent) English skills AND the lower labour rates, then the old adage about getting what you pay for might apply.

wants gold but only willing to pay for rice

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U.P. is the only real University.

^^^This

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I suspect that any really suitable candidates in the Philippines - with high capabilities in both Math and English - will likely find, or are aiming at, careers in academia, statistics, banking, insurance or meteorology. They might also be going for electronics engineering. Since you mentioned 5+ years experience and still not being able to develop the right skills, I have to ask what these folks would actually do working for you and why people with suitable math skills would want to do such work.What is the value proposition? Is there perhaps a different employment model that might be more effective?

We're actually in the field of software engineering - that's a lot easier than math though some of the best engineers come from math background.

 

The right skills in addition to logic and analysis are more about learning than writing programs - because unlike other fields, software engineers need to learn new things everyday: new technologies, methodologies, concepts and tools to improve efficiency at work (basically the efficiency of our works and the designs of software projects are constantly improved), and also read lots of documents from protocol specifications to documents written for other softwares we use. Amounts of actual work could be reduced a lot with the right tools and/or methodologies, and that's also why we have complete flexible work time at our headquarter.

 

A problem with our own folks is that since most of them cannot read English, their learning paths are restricted to universities, job training centers and internal training, which are far from enough. Most of them never become experienced.

 

 

 

 

BTW there is no way we can afford native English speakers like American programmers or even Indian ones. Their salary is more than double or triple of ours. Our software industry is rather tiny and poor and the salary level for professionals of all fields in Taiwan is far behind every nearby countries, even China.

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colemanlee

 

 

Our software industry is rather tiny and poor and the salary level for professionals of all fields in Taiwan is far behind every nearby countries, even China.

 

I would have never have thought that, I always looked at Taiwan as fairly progressive

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That's 20 years ago. Our only industry is still computer/mobile-related manufacturing and salary level hasn't been changed for 20 years. Even South Koreans who were once poorer now earn double than us.

 

 

We do have some of the first-world benefits: virtually free health care and education (inc. college), cheap massive transport systems, clean roads and very low-crime rate in Taipei, plus the highest house price in the world (on par with HK, probably higher than NY).

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...

UP is in Metro Manila isn't it? I doubt their graduates would be willing to work in Metro Cebu....

 

 

 ... we can easily provide comparatively higher salary for talented ones.

 

 

 

...BTW there is no way we can afford native English speakers like American programmers or even Indian ones. 

 

not all u.p. students want to move to/stay in  metro manila.  so how much are you willing to pay them to move to cebu?

 

by the way, ateneo de manila certainly turns out some competent graduates, as does, to lesser extents, university santo tomas and de la salle.

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Headshot

The problem with most Philippine universities is that they "herd" the students in any given program through the system together. There are no elective classes, so all students in the program get exactly the same classes and the same education. That results in cookie-cutter graduates that have no idea how to think outside the box because all of them learned the same things the same way (even though some may be better at it than others).

 

If you wonder how educated people can look at things that are obviously screwed up to the Western eye, and never even see a problem, that is why. They have learned to accept things as they are rather than learning to dream of how things can be. Even in high school in the US, students get to choose (at least to some degree) the courses they take. Here, there are no course choices all the way through university graduation. The only choice they make is which program to enter at university. After that, they are locked in.

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not all u.p. students want to move to/stay in  metro manila.  so how much are you willing to pay them to move to cebu?

 

We're paying 15,000 - 25,000 for graduates with no experience, but since salary is much higher in Manila/Makati I have no idea how much we should pay to get their students. Also salary in Philippines grows much faster as experience deepens, so we'd have to calculate that too (unlike in Taiwan where the best worker might get only triple of entry-level salary after 20 years)

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miles-high

We're paying 15,000 - 25,000 for graduates with no experience, but since salary is much higher in Manila/Makati I have no idea how much we should pay to get their students. Also salary in Philippines grows much faster as experience deepens, so we'd have to calculate that too (unlike in Taiwan where the best worker might get only triple of entry-level salary after 20 years)

When you scan the help wanted ads from the approved agencies, it appears that most manufacturing companies under PEZA (MEPZ, etc.) offer 3 to 7 times the salary you mentioned above for the “white collar” positions such as financial accountants, industrial/manufacturing engineers, CAD/CAM operators, robotic operators/maintenance personnel, quality control personnel, etc., etc. Maybe they have more incentive to offer higher pay to qualified Filipino graduates in manufacturing…

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that's monthly salary not yearly. Are you seriously telling me graduates in Philippines earn like one million per year?  :hyper:

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miles-high

that's monthly salary not yearly. Are you seriously telling me graduates in Philippines earn like one million per year?

Actually, most of them are not requiring any citizenship, Filipino univ grads or residency as PEZA companies can get work visas often within a few days... and, as I recall, the negative list does not apply to the PEZA operations... As long as you meet their qualification, I have seen those making between 50K to 200K a month in the manufacturing sector. I had two jobs there at one time, one with one of the major law firms there... I can tell you most Filipino lawyers* with 3 or 4 major firms are making 200K to 250K a month to start as associates... Filipino airline pilots, particularly captains, more! ;) Some OFW's, e.g., pilots, tanker/containership captains/first mates, etc., much more, even though they are Filipino school grads...

 

* Majors hire more lawyers from Ateneo, La Saller and San Carlos (mostly for their Visayas offices), whereas UP grads tend to go for government services, to the judiciary, etc.

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But these are lawyers and pilots, not engineers. And we're not talking about bio-engineers but software engineers. Software engineers can self-learn everything since age of 7 or 8 and without academic training, since there is no deep theory and no need of expensive labs or any equipment other than a PC and Internet access.

 

200k/mon is what USA software engineers make when they graduate. Do accountants and CAD designers in PEZA there also make more than 50k/mon? That would be even higher than salary in Taiwan and I'm not aware of any companies in Metro Cebu would offer salary like this.

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miles-high

Do accountants and CAD designers in PEZA there also make more than 50k/mon?

Well, we have already moved to the US so I don't see the bulletins any more but the last job opening I saw with PEZA (Laguna Econ Zone) was with a Japanese auto-parts manufacture offering 80K to 120K a month (depending on experience) for NC operators (there appear to be more demands on this particular profession)...

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