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Quality of Philippines college/university?


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For the past few months we have been interviewing filipino graduates from Cebu and nearby areas. We initially thought colleges/universities here might have better quality since they're really expensive and not unselectively recruiting students of all levels like in my own country, yet so far my experience is utter disappointment and frustration.

 

Some problems I noticed during the interviews: (most come from colleges)

 

  • They don't have any books in class.
  • They are taught lots of unrelated/useless classes in college, which shouldn't be part of their majors.
  • They could practice, but fail to understand or even memorize basic theories that should be taught at their first-year.
  • They have problem reading English materials, examples aside.
  • They have virtually no contact with outside world/community of people of the same majors/interest, despite that they can speak English fluently and Internet is accessible everywhere.
  • So in short, lack of knowledge and obvious lack of reading practice (probably a problem since primary schools? I wonder how many hours they spend in school everyday), and because of these they can hardly be trained to understand more advanced topics.

 

While not learning anything useful from college is more common (as in my own country), I'm shocked to find out that they have no book and lack basic reading skill, which is definitely detrimental to higher-level studies - things we do everyday in our field of work.

 

 

Does anyone else notice the same problems or we're just unlucky? Anyone here has children in their schools?

 

 

PS: I think from now on we'll only accept those from national universities :(

Edited by aqd
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Have a friend here that hires for the airlines, when he does he has two piles of applications, UP in one, everybody else in the other...if he cant get what he needs from the UP pile he might move to t

What is the difference between graduate and non graduate Pinoys? You can play scrabble with the graduates.

U.P. is the only real University.

For Real

What is the difference between graduate and non graduate Pinoys?

You can play scrabble with the graduates.

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PS: I think from now on we'll only accept those from national universities :(

 

U.P. is the only real University.

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We have 4 grads two san carlos... one uc and one normal university ,,, none of them make big money /// but none of them work as promo girls at the mall either

Edited by smokey
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What about MSU-IIT? I only interviewed a few of them remotely (not arriving to our company yet) and it seems the university does far better job at introducing advanced topics to students and encouraging them for self-learning, even though their understanding of basic theories is still poor.

 

 

We have 4 grads two san carlos... one uc and one normal university ,,, none of them make big money /// but none of them work as promo girls at the mall either

That's not good enough. We didn't come here to seek average workers - we have plenty in my own country - in fact I'd say most of people I work with in our field are rather hopeless and have no potential or prospect at all, even with 5+ years of experience, because they're unable to read (largely due to language barrier) and thus impossible to learn new things by themselves. But people here shouldn't have language barrier or reading difficulties....

Edited by aqd
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You ever notice that many of the very top politicians matriculated overseas?

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colemanlee

 

 

PS: I think from now on we'll only accept those from national universities

 

Have a friend here that hires for the airlines, when he does he has two piles of applications, UP in one, everybody else in the other...if he cant get what he needs from the UP pile he might move to the other pile...

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Same as here and China. But these are politicians not engineers.

 

 

UP is in Metro Manila isn't it? I doubt their graduates would be willing to work in Metro Cebu....

Edited by aqd
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colemanlee

Same as here and China. But these are politicians not engineers.

 

 

UP is in Metro Manila isn't it? I doubt their graduates would be willing to work in Metro Cebu....

UP has branches all over the Philippines...main campus is Manila as far as I know.but they even have a campus here in Tacloban

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You ever notice that many of the very top politicians matriculated overseas?

 

Top surgeons too.

 

But in Philippines, there is UP and there is everything else, and yes there is UP in Cebu.

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What about MSU-IIT? I only interviewed a few of them remotely (not arriving to our company yet) and it seems the university does far better job at introducing advanced topics to students and encouraging them for self-learning, even though their understanding of basic theories is still poor.

 

 

 

That's not good enough. We didn't come here to seek average workers - we have plenty in my own country - in fact I'd say most of people I work with in our field are rather hopeless and have no potential or prospect at all, even with 5+ years of experience, because they're unable to read (largely due to language barrier) and thus impossible to learn new things by themselves. But people here shouldn't have language barrier or reading difficulties....

 

Who said Smokey's four were average? There is also the problem of lack of opportunities for many of these youngsters.

 

It seems to me that your major prerequisite requirement is an ability to read and comprehend the English language.I agree that many graduates of institutions all over the Philippines will have trouble with that, but not all of them. It also looks like that basic requirement, though, is not enough. 

 

If the work is revenue generating and requires English comprehension, why not recruit in countries where English is the first language? If you are recruiting in the Philippines in order to take advantage of the (apparent) English skills AND the lower labour rates, then the old adage about getting what you pay for might apply.

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cebulover2000

What about MSU-IIT? I only interviewed a few of them remotely (not arriving to our company yet) and it seems the university does far better job at introducing advanced topics to students and encouraging them for self-learning, even though their understanding of basic theories is still poor.

 

 

 

That's not good enough. We didn't come here to seek average workers - we have plenty in my own country - in fact I'd say most of people I work with in our field are rather hopeless and have no potential or prospect at all, even with 5+ years of experience, because they're unable to read (largely due to language barrier) and thus impossible to learn new things by themselves. But people here shouldn't have languaga errier or reading difficulties....

 

 

May I ask where you are from?

 

I disagree with your assessment, not my experience, many have excellent reading and writing skills, the rest comes with practise.

 

 

 

edit: My BIL was working as an electronic engineer in MEPZA getting paid 12,000 pesos/month. I told him, don't be stupid, you can esily make more with almost any job online, knowing his skills. 5 years later he is making over 100 K

 

 

.

Edited by cebulover2000
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Taiwan.

 

It seems to me that your major prerequisite requirement is an ability to read and comprehend the English language.I agree that many graduates of institutions all over the Philippines will have trouble with that, but not all of them. It also looks like that basic requirement, though, is not enough.

I'm not talking about literature but more like reading English math articles and books for math graduates, who are not supposed to have difficulties because they'd have done that everyday during college times - but apparently that's not true here.

 

then the old adage about getting what you pay for might apply.

That's true. Our chance here is that they generally lack good domestic job opportunities on the field, and we can easily provide comparatively higher salary for talented ones.

 

 

 

 

 

I have not yet encountered any UP Cebu applicants.

Edited by aqd
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reading English

 

 

math articles and books for math graduates

 

 

I could be wrong, but I think you have about as much chance of finding suitable candidates in the Philippines as you have in any other country where English is used extensively. Firstly, you need people who can understand math articles and books (that's University level math I think - noone writes math articles for high school!) and then you want them to do it in English. 

 

Based on interacting with the Filipinos in our BPO operations, there are many graduates who can read, write and comprehend English just fine. However, the number of them who studied math (studied it, not had to ensure some minimal capability) is probably vanishingly small. The only person I know who is likely to read math articles or books for fun worked as an actuary and subsequently became an executive in large insurance companies. The last "math" lecture I went to (while in the workplace) was on data cryptography and I only understood the first 40 minutes or so! (and I received some of the best available education in the UK).

 

I suspect that any really suitable candidates in the Philippines - with high capabilities in both Math and English - will likely find, or are aiming at, careers in academia, statistics, banking, insurance or meteorology. They might also be going for electronics engineering. Since you mentioned 5+ years experience and still not being able to develop the right skills, I have to ask what these folks would actually do working for you and why people with suitable math skills would want to do such work.What is the value proposition? Is there perhaps a different employment model that might be more effective?

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