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RogerDuMond

 

 

what I cant figure out is what version of the English language do they not consider slang.

 

Northeastern

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We used to live on the west side of the island and our daughter (5 at the time) was enrolled in USJ Balamban campus. At the time of enrollment, the principal assured us repeatedly that all courses are

This is actually an interesting and important topic even for all Filipino families. One of the facts are the quality of English language teaching and skills has been going down for many years as was r

When I lived in AC, I met a teacher who, I was told, taught English at the local school.   She told me that, "my English wasnt good enough and wasnt what she told the children"   Aww heck, I had o

Skywalker

I remember in the 70's in the UK, the general belief was that we would all be speaking Japanese, having adopted their industrial methods blah blah blah.

 

We all know what happened there.

 

English is the language of the internet as well as business.  It's also essential, mostly, for Filipinos to get a good job here, from what I can see.

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English is also universal in airlines, shipping, and some other industry sectors.

 

Worth learning for anyone who wants to work abroad or in aany sector that uses English.

 

Heck, even the French Academy of Science now publishes their work in English and they must be the most anti-English people in the world.

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If you want your kids to succeed in America they better be fluent in Spanish.

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HeyMike

My little girl will be 4 next month, but she has not started school, yet. She is like my shadow and speaks more English than Visayan. She watches cartoons in English. She also speaks Visayan very well (so my wife tells me), but not as well as English. She even helps me to understand what her cousin is saying when her cousin speaks Visayan to me. There are some good home schooling programs online that have a curriculum with printouts for teaching English. I will use these to teach my girl how to read in English. She is very motivated about learning to read.

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Aww heck, I had only been speaking it for half-a-century, mainly in the UK,
Therein  lies the problem.
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My little girl will be 4 next month, but she has not started school, yet. She is like my shadow and speaks more English than Visayan. She watches cartoons in English. She also speaks Visayan very well (so my wife tells me), but not as well as English. She even helps me to understand what her cousin is saying when her cousin speaks Visayan to me. There are some good home schooling programs online that have a curriculum with printouts for teaching English. I will use these to teach my girl how to read in English. She is very motivated about learning to read.

 

You got that right Mike.

 

Having a young child speaking English well (and even better reading and counting) before starting school gives them an enormous advantage with their education. They start out ahead of the game with their schooling and remain ahead.

 

Lots of reading to them and having them read to you are important and fun ways to achieve language skills.

 

Young children have minds like a sponge - they can learn more than one language easily and very quickly, but it is important that they can separate them - not speaking a mixture of both.

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HeyMike

I only hope my girl does not pick up my heavy New Jersey accent. Now that could be a problem. :biggrin_01:

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HeyMike

You got that right Mike.

 

Having a young child speaking English well (and even better reading and counting) before starting school gives them an enormous advantage with their education. They start out ahead of the game with their schooling and remain ahead.

 

Lots of reading to them and having them read to you are important and fun ways to achieve language skills.

 

Young children have minds like a sponge - they can learn more than one language easily and very quickly, but it is important that they can separate them - not speaking a mixture of both.

 

You hit the nail on the head.

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Im accused of speaking slang all the time...by Filipinos....I suppose its my US Southern accent...what I cant figure out is what version of the English language do they not consider slang...Northern, MidWest, West Coast US English or Aussie English, Brit English or is it just Filipino English that is not slang...inquiring minds want to know... :db:

Standard English is without slang, slang is usually local or maybe country based, therefore not understood in other English speaking countries, of course western films have made a lot of slang understood worldwide, but the local stuff, no that has remained local. Even in tiny England people from the far south cannot always understand those from the far north, not just because of their accent or dialect but their local language is very different.

I have always thought the English spoken by educated people from Edinburgh as one of the clearest to understand, can you ken that?

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I have always thought the English spoken by educated people from Edinburgh as one of the clearest to understand, can you ken that?

 

Och Eye, but -

 

I rather like the "Pam Ayers" version of English

 

<www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4oydSZTAns>

 

<www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGcKVumVO08>

 

Lol!

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The Filipina wife of a Welsh friend, has a perfect Welsh accent to her English.

 

Apparently other Filipinas have a job to understand her!

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colemanlee

I have noticed over the years that when you are in the presence of others speaking in a different accented English, ie Aussies, Brits etc..it does not take much more than a week until your accent adapts to theirs, enabling better understanding, interesting to me was when we were in AC, I ran into mostly Aussies and one South African, the Aussies seemed to have accents to me, but the South African who spent a good deal of time in London, had no perceptible accent to me.

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RogerDuMond

 

 

I have always thought the English spoken by educated people from Edinburgh as one of the clearest to understand

 

Not to Filipinos, they have a much easier time understanding English spoken by an American than English spoken by someone from the British Empire because of the accent.

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rainymike

 

 

There are some good home schooling programs online that have a curriculum with printouts for teaching English. I will use these to teach my girl how to read in English. She is very motivated about learning to read.

 

I use tutors to assist in the formal learning. Primarily because it helps on exam performance. But the real priorities for my kids are not there. At some point in time they'll have learned the game well enough to maintain decent grades. They'll have learned all the rules, learned how to kiss up to the teach, learned how to figure out a multiple choice test, blah, blah.

 

Beyond the classroom I try to get the kids to read whatever they please (with some parental guidance). I think enjoying to read and thinking for oneself is more important than grammatical rules. And I try to interact with them a bit. I also make them write without being too much of a grammar nazi. We do most of this stuff online. So instead of being in lock step with the traditional curriculum, I allow them to wander off in different directions and participate in their exploration.

 

Sometimes I think we are overly obsessed with schools. Yeah they have a role to play. But I think real education happens beyond the classroom. At least that's been my life experience. Kids have a brain and can put it to use in a lot of creative ways - above and beyond what is taught in the classroom. But some parental guidance is helpful in doing that.

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