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I do believe there are those who see English not as the great enabler but as a reminder of a colonial past. They in a sort of new nationalism and to keep the masses behind are doing what they can to reduce it. One example is the new textbooks which are not in English.

A very good point, and in a similar vein, this is happening in China too, recently the Government issued a statement saying that no longer will a basic level of English be a requirement to enter University. They suggested that Mandarin was more important and more useful, however, it was leaked that in fact it was a way to discourage the population from travelling abroad for education and allowing people to be influenced by western ideology.

 

So in these two cases (China, Philippines)  it is a powerful form of control to diminish the use of an international language, thus limiting the peoples knowledge base.

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We used to live on the west side of the island and our daughter (5 at the time) was enrolled in USJ Balamban campus. At the time of enrollment, the principal assured us repeatedly that all courses are

This is actually an interesting and important topic even for all Filipino families. One of the facts are the quality of English language teaching and skills has been going down for many years as was r

When I lived in AC, I met a teacher who, I was told, taught English at the local school.   She told me that, "my English wasnt good enough and wasnt what she told the children"   Aww heck, I had o

contraman

A very good point, and in a similar vein, this is happening in China too, recently the Government issued a statement saying that no longer will a basic level of English be a requirement to enter University. They suggested that Mandarin was more important and more useful, however, it was leaked that in fact it was a way to discourage the population from travelling abroad for education and allowing people to be influenced by western ideology.

 

So in these two cases (China, Philippines)  it is a powerful form of control to diminish the use of an international language, thus limiting the peoples knowledge base.

 
Most Widely Spoken Languages in the World
Approx number of speakers
1. Chinese  1,197,000,000
2. Spanish 414,000,000
3. English 335,000,000
4. Hindi 260,000,000
 
The problem is that there are so many dialects of chinese
 
However, like many of you I have traveled extensively and have always found someone with basic English no matter where I have been.
I was brought up in a French Speaking household, But now I consider English to be my first language.
 
So do what ever you have to to have your children learn English IMHO :)
 
Now where is that Esperanto Forum gone :yahoo:
Edited by contraman
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One example is the new textbooks which are not in English.

 

Doesn't make sense, speaking English is the only way most Filipinos graduates will find work (Hotels or call-center agent) and that demand is only growing.

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contraman

Doesn't make sense, speaking English is the only way most Filipinos graduates will find work (Hotels or call-center agent) and that demand is only growing.

But isn't that so true of so many things in the PI ?  :idontknow:

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Three years ago I managed to get an interview with the head of language studies at a large university in Cebu city, the Dean, however told me that they had no need for a professional native English teacher, as in her opinion, English was the first language of the Philippines and therefore could be easily taught by local Filipina teachers. When I pointed out that as a native English speaker I often had problems understanding locals working in shops, offices and even banks, she replied that was obviously due to my own listening skills. Even after pointing out that I had an excellent British education and have been successfully teaching English for over 12 years around the world, she refused to accept that there was any problems with the way English was taught in Phils.

I was deeply saddened that an educated person like her could have such a blinkered view of education. Especially something as important as communication skills.

 

Then there's the fact that a Filipino instructor might not even show up to teach the English class that's been paid for. I've heard too many times of teachers at local universities that rarely show up to teach the course and only give exams. The reason the current girl has problems with English is that her English instructor in college never showed up.

 

On top of that, there are English classes that just show the latest movie on DVD for the coursework. At least it's in English, but I think the students could do that at home easily enough...

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contraman
On top of that, there are English classes that just show the latest movie on DVD for the coursework. At least it's in English, but I think the students could do that at home easily enough...

 

There are plenty Online (and free) English courses available.

They are Okay and even easier if there is a native English speaker to oversee it :)

 

There is a saying that is relevant here and that is

"If it is to be, It is up to me"

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There are plenty Online (and free) English courses available.

They are Okay and even easier if there is a native English speaker to oversee it :)

 

I've found that talking with her on the phone 3-4 hours a day seems to have improved her English significantly since we met! She does complain of "nosebleed", but admits her English is getting much better! :)

 

My boys only knew Japanese up to the age of 10, even though their mother is a friggin' English teacher in Japan. Sending them to Vegas for 2 years fixed that problem. They're now fluent in English and passing the local exams with 100% accuracy!

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Steve and Myrlita

If memory serves, Noynoy made a govt order that all schools are to now teach the kids in their mother tongue. I would say that is anti foreigner wouldn't you? If call centers need good English speakers, why is the govt trying to stone wall and torpedo that?

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We used to live on the west side of the island and our daughter (5 at the time) was enrolled in USJ Balamban campus. At the time of enrollment, the principal assured us repeatedly that all courses are taught in English. We only speak English at home, so at the time we were happy to hear this.

 

After a few weeks, our daughter would come home crying every day. She didn't have a clue as to what anyone was saying -- it turns out that all of the classes were taught in Bisayan, the exact opposite of what was told to us. Looking back on it, this was a blessing in disguise because it was the catalyst we needed for moving to Cebu City and enrolling her in an international school. Her school, CIE, really teaches everything in English and -- notably -- the students themselves speak English all the time... both in-class and outside of class.

 

Interestingly, she's taking a course in Filipiniana and is learning Bisayan as well (DepEd requirement). Because it's taught in English, though, she can understand the concepts with no problem. The other day she came home with a perfect 100/100 on a Filipino test... something I never would have imagined just a few years back when she was at USJ Balamban. So, in short, she's supported with the English language on two fronts: in the home and in the school, which has made a significant & positive impact on her language abilities. 

 

 

Cheers,

Aren

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rainymike

The new natiional curriculum uses the mother tongue for the first several years in school. That was a bad move in my opinion, but the same mindset exists in the States with a lot of educators believing that schools are biased against non-English speakers. How that's actually implemented varies from school to school. Our kids in nursery, 2nd and 4th grades all have English and Tagalog with the mother tongue pretty much phased out.

 

Not really worried about language much. Kids are exposed to American style English pretty much on the Internet and television and daddy. When the oldest boy slips into mother tongue at the table, he gets down and gives me 10 pushups. And that's more of an excuse I use to make him exercise since he's a tad overweight.

 

English in the Philippines has its own character. I think we should get over it. I mean if I were living in Australia instead, I wouldn't bust my chops trying to get my kids to speak Americanized English. 

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Maybe someone already mentioned this but they used to have a good tool for this......I think it was called something like, books?  Read to them, have them read to you, etc.

 

My wife is in college now and her English "prof" was teaching them accents and she told me some of the American English he was telling them.  Sounded like that ebonics carp to me.  I told her to let her classmates know to forget that carp as soon as the class is over and if they use it in the US they'll be looked at as idiots.  No, people don't atully say atully.

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Davaoeno
The other day at one of the school assemblies the principal got up and started speaking Bisayan. ...... I yelled speak English and my wife looked at me like I was crazy

 

 

 

There is more to communication that the choice of language .     I believe you proved to the whole school that they will never be able to communicate with you !

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colemanlee

I was giving the "Mother Tongue" some thought the other day, mostly trying to figure out why anybody would pass a law that basically keeps huge segments of the country from being able to communicate with each other.  

Here its Waray Waray, in Cebu and the west part of Leyte its Bisayan, and a cast of thousands elsewhere...now many say its only for the first few years in school but in reality it continues for the rest of their life..

When we were in AC, the wife told me they were speaking something called Kapangan and it was completely different from Waray

 

So why would you do that when its widely advertised that the national languages are Tagalog and English?

 

Could the answer be the dumbing down of the populace? Keeping the different segments from being able to communicate would go a long way from there ever being a national uprising on the order of EDSA...thus maintaining the status quo....

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There is a precedence in this country about not teaching languages. Did you ever wonder why in Mexico, Argentina, etc they speak Spanish but not in the Philippines.

 

It is because the Spanish government did not teach it to them because they were worried once they learned it they would want more things.

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Davaoeno

There is a precedence in this country about not teaching languages. Did you ever wonder why in Mexico, Argentina, etc they speak Spanish but not in the Philippines.

 

It is because the Spanish government did not teach it to them because they were worried once they learned it they would want more things.

 

you mean things like paella, pollo,  chiles relleno , and tapas  ?

 

 

 

 

Spanish was the official language of the Philippines from the beginning of Spanish rule in the late 16th century, through the conclusion of the Spanish–American War in 1898. It remained, along with English, as a de facto official language until removed in 1973 by a constitutional change. After a few months it was re-designated an official language by presidential decree and remained official until 1987, when the present Constitutionremoved its official status, designating it instead as an optional language.[1][2]

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