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The law forcing children into crime.


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littlejohn

My wife is always talking about how to help young people that their family cant afford or don't want (often teens).  She often suggests hiring them but of course this is illegal and I threaten to leave every time she suggests it.

 

I have come to realize that many of these children have no choice but to turn to crime. They cant afford school even if it interests them, some cant even afford decent food. They cant work because the employers would be charged with human trafficking.

 

The only exception is if you support a student then they can work for you when not in school (were doing this with one relative already but cant afford more). Obviously something needs to change but I don't hold much hope of it happening in the next decade. The whole situation disgusts me.

 

 

 

 

On a separate but related subject I did have an idea the other day. We are still running the bakery so how about we buy some cheap bicycles and loan them out to the teens to run a pandasal (hot bread) route? If their ambitious they shouldn't have any trouble making 100-200p a day at this even with just a bicycle to haul it around.

 

Anyone know if you can get in legal trouble loaning a kid a bike and selling them bread on credit? I would think it would be OK since they aren't employees.

Edited by littlejohn
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woodchopper

a mate of mine had an expensive bike stolen,,it was on video,,it was a little guy with black hair,,,,,,,,, :yahoo:

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SkyMan

 

 

Anyone know if you can get in legal trouble loaning a kid a bike and selling them bread on credit? I would think it would be OK since they aren't employees.
If you were local it would probably be fine.

 

One of the businesses here in Liloan does something like that through having people sell masa(sp).  They are little sweet dough balls with some crushed peanuts or something inside.  I think they have to pay something up front for a tray full and then they go out to the road and sell them to cars and jeeps passing through town.  I've seen them in other areas too.  The masa are p5 a piece and I would say there are 200 in a full tray.  p5 is probably a bit over priced but part of the draw is helping out one of these folks.  It's usually young teens or 30ish mothers selling them.  As long as they return the tray they remain in good standing and can sell again the next day.  The cheap trays probably aren't worth stealing compared to the value of being able to sell a tray.   I don't know how much they make on the sales but even p1 for a 200 piece tray would be pretty good.  I sometimes buy some as long as they aren't too pushy about it.  

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littlejohn

If you were local it would probably be fine.

 

 

Our businesses are all in the wife's name and she controls them. I only work as a part time cashier for the internet cafe and offer ideas.

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Cipro

If you were local it would probably be fine.

 

One of the businesses here in Liloan does something like that through having people sell masa(sp).  They are little sweet dough balls with some crushed peanuts or something inside.  I think they have to pay something up front for a tray full and then they go out to the road and sell them to cars and jeeps passing through town.  I've seen them in other areas too.  The masa are p5 a piece and I would say there are 200 in a full tray.  p5 is probably a bit over priced but part of the draw is helping out one of these folks.  It's usually young teens or 30ish mothers selling them.  As long as they return the tray they remain in good standing and can sell again the next day.  The cheap trays probably aren't worth stealing compared to the value of being able to sell a tray.   I don't know how much they make on the sales but even p1 for a 200 piece tray would be pretty good.  I sometimes buy some as long as they aren't too pushy about it.  

 

 

The more interesting question is are you brave enough to eat those balls?

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Jawny

 

 

 

 

On a separate but related subject I did have an idea the other day. We are still running the bakery so how about we buy some cheap bicycles and loan them out to the teens to run a pandasal (hot bread) route? If their ambitious they shouldn't have any trouble making 100-200p a day at this even with just a bicycle to haul it around.

 

Anyone know if you can get in legal trouble loaning a kid a bike and selling them bread on credit? I would think it would be OK since they aren't employees.

Selling products as you describe is a common and excellent way to get some income. However, these are NOT employees as you describe. Anyone is able to buy a product for a certain price and then sell it to others for a different price.

 

However, there is a certain amount of risk to you if there are bicycles involved. As the owner, there could be some sort of liability if the child is injured or injures others. I would advise against the bicycle loaning, though there's nothing preventing you from making the bikes available through a third party....a neighbor perhaps. Just keep your direct involvement separate.

 

There are a couple of school kids who sell bread for us. They walk their "route" each day. They use a styrofoam box we provide and carry as much as the box will hold. They don't make as much as the adult delivery guys who use motorcycles to deliver to sari sari stores. However, at Christmas time we give ALL delivery guys a cash bonus as well as ham and other goodies. The kids supplement their family income for the price of a few hours labor.

 

If you plan to let several kids do this, there is another risk. The common way of doing this is for the bread to be provided on credit. At the end of the delivery, a tally is made and the delivery person pays the discounted price and returns unsold bread. This bread gets sold later.

 

The risk with kids is lack of discipline. Damaged bread, failure to pay the credit etc. Simple solution is to end their relationship with the store. Cash only.

 

As far as legal issues, using credit at stores is as common as spitting. In our bakery, there is NO CREDIT except for the delivery guys.

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