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Electrical Wiring and Grounding?


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SkyMan

 

 

MY dryer is fine because they adjusted it to this place verses where it was adjusted for when made in the US.
So you're saying this Made in the US Dryer was made for export to somewhere with 50Hz power?  Could be.  Then yes, it would need to be adjusted back to 60Hz.

 

You might have problem with the voltage set up here and your dryer may not work. The dryer heating element uses 220 VAC. The accessories and PC control board use 110 VAC. If the supply voltage is two hot legs (no ground) then with your added ground wire your dryer should work fine. In my area we have the two wire system, one grounded leg and one hot leg. Cannot get 110 VAC here. I did the same as you are doing with your wiring. Had them add extra ground wire , sank two grounded rod. I also use GFI in my kitchen and bath rooms.

Good luck with your project. Watch them closely as sometimes they tend to cut corners.

That sounds correct to me. You'll need VECO type power with 2 hot lines and neutral wire from the pole.  It's probably alright to use a house ground wire but I wouldn't count on it.  Also, my neighbor has recently burned up his dryer from the US because it was actually 110v.  I didn't know any US dryers were 110v but I guess it's possible.

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Just a warning if you are in a VECO supply area or any other area that are supplied with 2 hots   They use single pole light switches, so even when you turn the light switch off you still have 1

Most use the RCD or RCCB term these days as the "ground fault" is often read as to require a ground to operate which is not the case.  In the USA these are normally only used in wet point areas (pool/

My breaker box

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Woolf
ou might have problem with the voltage set up here and your dryer may not work. The dryer heating element uses 220 VAC. The accessories and PC control board use 110 VAC. If the supply voltage is two hot legs (no ground) then with your added ground wire your dryer should work fine

 

If you are in an area with 2 hots no neutral

you can not just by ramming down a ground rod have a neutral

the ground rod is for protection nothing else

 

If you have a ground rod you will be lucky that it is 10 ohm to the ground rod at the pole transformer

with a 10 ohm resistance  and at 5 amps you are going to drop 50 volt

at 10 amp you will drop 100 volt

 

DO NOT USE A GROUND ROD AS RETURN

 

Next time someone suggest to use ground rod as return

I will make a schematic that will explain why not to do it

 

Anyway I think it is illegal

Edited by Woolf
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fred42

We have 3 wires and a ground rod.. A bit pointless really as just about every appliance we bought here,TV,Ref etc only has 2 wires!

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Woolf

We have 3 wires and a ground rod.. A bit pointless really as just about every appliance we bought here,TV,Ref etc only has 2 wires!

 

fred42  what area ?  who is the supplier ?

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musicman666

Just about, but not the RP.  We're supposed to be 60Hz here.  Not many clocks are effected, maybe one on your stove.  But yes, motors don't like to be on the wrong frequency.  Either running too fast and perhaps burning out or just running too slow.  Your drier should be fine.

Anything with a compressor ...such as ac and refs from outside will not function here ...if they do it will be a short life.

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The added ground rod is just for safety actually. Not suggesting it to be used as a return. The 110 volt is what is used for the dryer control, timers, lights etc. We use Whirlpool washer, dryer and refrigerator which was made in the US and export to the Ph. 

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fred42

fred42  what area ?  who is the supplier ?

 

 

We get our appliances..LED TV`s Ref`s etc from Abensons in Bohol..

Looked at a freezer/beer chiller yesterday,even that only had 2 wires! Mind you its only 120 watts..(they said)

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RogerDat

Ok, 110VAC dryer is normaly gas heating.

The motor on my 220VAC has a plastic adapter that can compensate for 50 / 60 HZ depending on what you have. The squiggel writing on the page with the adapter is mid east writing I think, so maybe it was intended for sale there.

My dryer in US was stright 220VAC (1981-2002).

The only plug that can safely be used on dryer here is same one sold in US, and here is called a stove plug, about P500.

The little local plugs can melt sometimes on dryers, and mine came with that small plug as it was all they had, it worked, but I did not want to watch the thing as it dried, so I put the big plug on it.

I had a ground wire on it but always wear shoes when using it and the washer "just in case" as I am always wet with perspration.

Use your volt amp meter and see what voltage you have. Check your dryer data plate, note the amp rating.

Check the amps after 10 Min or so, and see if in range indicated. If not, something is not right. You can also use the meter to check for ground, case to ground rod, low range, and see if U get reading. If you do, something is not right.

If you have the NL1-63 or equilavelent, you should be protected from shock.

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SkyMan

 

 

Ok, 110VAC dryer is normaly gas heating.
If you're referring to my neighbor's dryer I don't think it's gas but he says it's 110V.  It's not working now so maybe I can take a look at it and see what it is.  

 

The motor on my 220VAC has a plastic adapter that can compensate for 50 / 60 HZ depending on what you have. The squiggel writing on the page with the adapter is mid east writing I think, so maybe it was intended for sale there.
Yes, squiggel people use 50Hz so even though manufactured in the US it needed to be adjusted for here.
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lopburi3

 

 

Looked at a freezer/beer chiller yesterday,even that only had 2 wires! Mind you its only 120 watts..(they said)

Suspect you would find a screw/nut to connect a ground wire near the rear bottom of that unit and a caution to do so in front pages of the instructions.

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RogerDat

My aunts old Cold Spot taught me never touch a fridge barefooted!

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fred42
Suspect you would find a screw/nut to connect a ground wire near the rear bottom of that unit and a caution to do so in front pages of the instructions.

 

 

Perhaps you are right..

Just bought an "American home" electric single kitchen top cooker.. 1300 watts... 2 wires..No ground wire attached!!

Edited by fred42
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  • 4 months later...

Hello! Sorry for bringing up this thread from the dead. I want to add a separate circuit for my personal computer and future homelab equipment (FreeNAS server and KVM hypervisor servers).

 

As is the norm here, there is no grounding conductor in the house I am currently staying at. I actually receive a small shock every time I any metallic object that is connected to my computer (e.g. USB ports, connected USB plugs). I have also read somewhere that having a surge protector with no ground makes the surge protector not protecting the connected equipment. Does anyone here have any suggested certified or licensed electrician that could do what I want (and preferably at a low price)? I am located in Lapu-Lapu City, near the Birhen sa Regla Church in Mercado. Our supplier is MECO. Thank you!

Greetings fellow FreeNAS user ;)

 

First, if you are getting a shock, you have a separate issue. I'm unsure what the PEC says, I don't have a copy and I didn't find a good PDF online, but this sounds like you have a device that is expecting the "neutral" to be at ground potential, and it is not. In America, I would say make sure you are using a GFCI and that the neutral is properly sized and grounded. Many devices used to bond the neutral to chassis. 

 

Ideally, the neutral (grounded conductor) and ground (grounding conductor) would both be tied to earth ground at your distribution panel and would then be brought separately to each point of use. 

 

 

 

I'm in the process of rebuilding an ESXi box myself ;)

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U can get that plug set from Cebu Home Builders and a few others. It is called a stove plug.

The Hz is difrent here, my dryer came from US sold here, it has a adapter that changes the drive rotation of the drum to compensate. The adapter fits on the drum belt spendel.

My experience is the stove and dryer plugs are different in US for 220v appliances. The stove, (range), plug is for 50 amp and the dryer is 30 amp and smaller is actual size than the 50. The plugs have different size holes also and are not interchangeable.

 

Also just finished a house in Siquijor and was told there would be an extra charge for permits if I used ground wire, which I did. So far they have not inspected the house so no additional charges. We are solid rock where we built the house so I laid the ground wire in a ditch instead of attempting to drive a rod into the ground. In the old days in the states the ground was attached to the copper water line.

Edited by Daddy
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In the old days in the states the ground was attached to the copper water line.

 

I think that would be illegal now most places, you do not know when the water line goes into plastic, then it could be a very ineffective ground

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