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Electrical Wiring and Grounding?


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RogerDat

Greetings! Lets dig this thing up again.

If you already have your electrical connection, you can use whatever device you want to. No one is going to check. The device I posted is needed by MECO on Mactan to get original connection, for upgrade, you can use what you want.

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Just a warning if you are in a VECO supply area or any other area that are supplied with 2 hots   They use single pole light switches, so even when you turn the light switch off you still have 1

Most use the RCD or RCCB term these days as the "ground fault" is often read as to require a ground to operate which is not the case.  In the USA these are normally only used in wet point areas (pool/

My breaker box

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fordtech

I had a chat with my electrician that will be wiring my new house. I told him I wanted grounded plugs in all rooms. He said we dont do that here. I said you will on my house. I told him how we were doing it and he is on board now. The only thing we have to chat with the power company about is my clothes dryer. Its a 220v from the US, needs the big 220v plug. 

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RogerDat

U can get that plug set from Cebu Home Builders and a few others. It is called a stove plug.

The Hz is difrent here, my dryer came from US sold here, it has a adapter that changes the drive rotation of the drum to compensate. The adapter fits on the drum belt spendel.

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Woolf
The Hz is difrent here,

 

Please explain   different from what ?

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SkyMan

 

 

The Hz is difrent here
US and Phils are both supposed to be 60Hz?
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Woolf

I have a question about MECO

 

The wires going to the house,

is it 2 insulated wires or 1 bare + 1 insulated ?

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Woolf

Fordtech

 

Who is supplying electricity in your area?

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RogerDat

MECO is on Mactan.

My dryer is U.S. made, was shiped with an adapter that fits on the drum drive shaft that changes the rotation speed depending on the HZ, The instructions are in aribic, and only the pictures are of use.

The delivery man removed access panel, took adapter off and reversed it. he said it was to compensate for voltage diffrence.

My washer came from us, but is ok without any changes as far as I know.

As I saw him make the change, I assume whatever it was set at was not usable here (motor speed affected)

 

GOOGLE

In the United States, electricity is normally supplied at 110 or 120 volts at a frequency of 60 Hz. Electricity in Europe, and just about the rest of the world, is generally supplied at 220 volts and a frequency of 50 Hz. I believe it’s officially 230 volts, but any device rated between 200 volts and 240 volts will work.

Frequency – Hertz (Hz):

Countries use either 60 Hz (US) or 50 Hz (Europe/Asia). Most electrical devices are not affected by the cycle change, and in a lot of cases, support both cycles. Frequency is likely to affect analog clocks (it won’t keep time correctly) and devices with motors. There isn’t a whole lot you can do about frequency, but know that it’s generally not a problem.

 

SUPPOSED to be 220 240 volts but untill Saterday was mostly at 185-200 VAC SEE 13.8 KV upgrade Kalawisan post.

 

We have 2 insulated wires FOR NOW, but the red wire they require is deterating in the strong sun, I think it is control wire and not for use outside. It looks like snake shedding skin (Clear coat) as for red coat, it is becoming yellow. We will see.

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Woolf

330px-Voltage_and_frequency.png

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SkyMan
Electricity in Europe, and just about the rest of the world, is generally supplied at 220 volts and a frequency of 50 Hz

Just about, but not the RP.  We're supposed to be 60Hz here.  Not many clocks are effected, maybe one on your stove.  But yes, motors don't like to be on the wrong frequency.  Either running too fast and perhaps burning out or just running too slow.  Your drier should be fine.

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Woolf

If you have a 50 hz motor and put it on 60 hz it will run faster

If you have a 60 hz motor and put it on 50 hz it will run slower

 

This can be compensated by changing the diameter of the motor pulley

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fordtech

I had it hooked up in Pampanga in my last house and it worked perfect. Here we have Celco.

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RogerDat

MY dryer is fine because they adjusted it to this place verses where it was adjusted for when made in the US.

My point is are all US dryers universal now?

I was alerting the fordteck to check his data plate.

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I had a chat with my electrician that will be wiring my new house. I told him I wanted grounded plugs in all rooms. He said we dont do that here. I said you will on my house. I told him how we were doing it and he is on board now. The only thing we have to chat with the power company about is my clothes dryer. Its a 220v from the US, needs the big 220v plug. 

Why not change the cord to a local cord instead of the socket? 

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I had a chat with my electrician that will be wiring my new house. I told him I wanted grounded plugs in all rooms. He said we dont do that here. I said you will on my house. I told him how we were doing it and he is on board now. The only thing we have to chat with the power company about is my clothes dryer. Its a 220v from the US, needs the big 220v plug. 

You might have problem with the voltage set up here and your dryer may not work. The dryer heating element uses 220 VAC. The accessories and PC control board use 110 VAC. If the supply voltage is two hot legs (no ground) then with your added ground wire your dryer should work fine. In my area we have the two wire system, one grounded leg and one hot leg. Cannot get 110 VAC here. I did the same as you are doing with your wiring. Had them add extra ground wire , sank two grounded rod. I also use GFI in my kitchen and bath rooms.

Good luck with your project. Watch them closely as sometimes they tend to cut corners.

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