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to_dave007

State of Water Calamity in Cebu

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Ed1961

IMHO... Here in the PI, it will come down to he who has water wins

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woodchopper

Voila,,the skies just opened,,in a heavy fashion! heavy rain for an hour just b4,,downtown with lightning

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to_dave007

IMHO... Here in the PI, it will come down to he who has water wins

I agree.

 

Voila,,the skies just opened,,in a heavy fashion! heavy rain for an hour just b4,,downtown with lightning

Still nothing here on Cebu northwest coast.. we had 10 minute sprinkle about 4 days ago but the ground was so hot it just evaporated again

Edited by to_dave007

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Paul

Not sure how much land you have, thinking of storage capacity here. But, especially if someone lives in the provincial areas of the Philippines, they should be able to set up a system that will support them at least through the dry season, if not all year long.

 

Naturally, you would want to be connected to your own well, or the municipal water supply for your main sources of water. However, using the roof of your home and any out buildings you may have, you can collect a surprising amount of water during rains.

 

I live in a city, thus am connected to the main water supply from the city. However, I (READ: my helper) use the rain water stored to shower (yes, outside), and to wash clothes. I currently have it set up to divert the first thirty-two liters of rain water to clean the collection area. After the diverted tube fills, the rain water is routed to the primary tank, a 1500 liter stainless steel tank. I then route the water, as needed, to fill up other storage tanks near the house. In a single, heavy rain, my primary tank can go from completely empty, to completely filled, in about 10 to 12 minutes.

 

What I am getting at here is, there are options to help get you through droughts and other times without an adequate water supply. Alternatively, it is a great back up source of water.

 

Here is an example of someone who lives in an area using rain collection as his only source of water. His name is Billy Kniffen. He and his wife live on less than 9" of rain fall per year, in Central Texas. I have looked to him in the past for advice, regarding my own rain water collection installations.

 

 

 

 

Still nothing here on Cebu northwest coast.

 

San Remegio area?

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to_dave007

Deep well plans firming up. Digging should start June 10.

Most components should be there before then.

Remote site. Not easy to get to.

 

San Remegio area?

Tuburan.

Edited by to_dave007
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to_dave007

Paul.. One of my projects on next trip is to add rainwater storage here at house. Roof is 150 square meters and there is couple smaller outbuildings as well, so I know I can capture quite a bit of rain here with the tanks. Planning to use it mostly for gardening.

 

I have a deep well also that is capable to provide far more than our needs. Water tastes good, and I had it tested this year, and it's potable. But bottled water for drinking is cheap, so we will continue getting it.

 

But none of that will help in the mountains, and the capital cost of water collection and storage is beyond most people there.

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Paul

 

 

But none of that will help in the mountains, and the capital cost of water collection and storage is beyond most people there.

 

Sorry. My post was directed at those who obviously can afford to do this. However, even poor farmers here in Cambodia, have large jars they use to collect rain water in, from their respect roofs. 

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SkyMan

No significant rain here in Liloan for months.

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to_dave007

Sorry. My post was directed at those who obviously can afford to do this. However, even poor farmers here in Cambodia, have large jars they use to collect rain water in, from their respect roofs.

I remember your interesting postings some months ago about those jars, and the video about how they make them. Such jars would likely make daily life easier during the rainy season simply by storing water between rains. They do catch what they can now.. in other containers.

 

In the dry season they wouldn't help much, unless they had a LOT of them.

 

There is one mason here that is pretty damned skilled and I think if I show him the video then he could make them. Might be fun getting it up the mountain.. likely easier to make a few on site.

Edited by to_dave007

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Ed1961

interesting because my thoughts were focused on how to collect and more importantly how to reuse wastewater from washing and laundry for water conservation

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to_dave007

interesting because my thoughts were focused on how to collect and more importantly how to reuse wastewater from washing and laundry for water conservation

Can't think of anything practical.. on a small household scale.. that you could do with that wastewater other than using it in the garden. You might need to change soap to something more suitable..

 

You may need to worry about pests.. including rats..

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Paul

 

I remember your interesting postings some months ago about those jars, and the video about how they make them.
 
Yeah. My friend from New Zealand, Brian Kemp, made that video for me, upon my request. It was specifically to show members here how they were made. I recall Bob (thebob) being one who was very interested in them. That is what prompted me to ask Brian to make the video. A really great guy, too. 
 
Here is his video again, for those who may have missed it the first time:
 
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thebob

Not sure how much land you have, thinking of storage capacity here.

 

 

The problem with storage is the prohibitive cost. 200 litre "blue drums" cost between 800 to 1200 pesos, steel tanks are around 10 -20,000 in the 1-2 cubic meter size. Concrete tanks are also expensive and quite difficult to build properly.

 

For costal areas the ideal would be desalination, but the membranes are quite expensive.

 

In Moalboal the situate is dire. The resorts have pools that could supply plenty of water to the locals, but they are reduced to waiting by stand pipes for the odd occasions that all of the pump driven tanks of the rich are filled. The fire truck is constantly delivering water to many different areas. I just hope it isn't needed for a fire.

 

Traffic these days is dominated by water delivery, and charges of 350 to 500 pesos per meter are common. Of course it is the outlying areas that are suffering most, the beach areas next, and the area around the municipal has constant supply.

 

There is a chart in the water company that graphs supply by area. Basdiot, (Panagsama beach) is listed at 1 hour a day, but I know many people haven't seen water flow through their pipes for many months.

 

Building here has far outstripped supply, and delivery infrastructure is failing miserably to deliver water to 5 times the amount of customers it was designed for.

 

Collecting rainwater is a great idea, but it isn't really practical considering the cost.

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easy44

It's easy enough to build a large tank or cistern from hollow blocks, as long as you don't plan on moving it!  Ha ha!

 

I built a 4500 liter above ground concrete water tank that has served me well for more than 8 years.  Just use lots of kabilya (rebar) and put Sahara waterproofing additive in the cement.  Very cheap to build and very permanent!  It developed a few small cracks a couple of years ago but just drained it, patched the cracks with Sahara mix and it's good as new.  I use it to store the water coming from my spring, but it could be used for water reclamation also.

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