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Paul

Monolithic Dome Construction Anyone?

Dome House Construction  

88 members have voted

  1. 1. How likely would you be to build a home like this?

    • I will definitely go with this type of construction.
      6
    • I like this and will most likely build a dome home.
      4
    • I'm interested in looking into this a bit further.
      23
    • I would consider this, but not sure at this time.
      12
    • It is doubtful that I would build a dome home.
      19
    • I would not consider this type of construction.
      24


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RogerDat

They corrected themselves in the body, but I cannot find any basalt formationms in PI, much less a casting facility, so I guess the basic material came from Texas as that is where co. is located.

BUT!!! can they float? Was that not the cause of most death during last storm, storm surge?

Edited by RogerDat

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Jester

OMG!    Any conception of what it would be like to build and finish walls inside one of those?  And cabinets, oh my, cabinet builders retirement fund.   Opp's forgot to put an outlet/switch/light somewhere, not problem, a guy with a stick with a  nail in it for about a month!

 

I have done cabinets in buses being converted to motorhomes,  very time consuming to do right.  

 

If I needed to do something different in the PI's it would be rammed earth.   Dirt is dirt cheap and so is labor.           Jester   

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SkyMan

heard of a canadian guy in cebu who uses bamboo to build geodesic domes...pretty cool. looks definitely more versatile and easier to build than this one, probably a lot cheaper not to mention eco-friendly. :)

I can't imagine using bamboo for a geodome. Each point on the dome is the ends of 6 pieces of framework coming together. I can't imagine how you'd get the end of six pieces of bamboo together with any kind of strength. Now maybe if the framework were coco and it was clad in bamboo, that might work. If you can keep the bugs out. Edited by SkyMan

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TequilaSunset

Portable cabin... can be shipped by barge. I would hate to think how much to the Phil$.

 

cabin02.jpg

 

cabin03.jpg

 

More info from their page...

 

http://www.monolithic.org/cabins/photos#2

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Hy H

Interesting although the domes look pretty small to me. Another concern is lack of insulation.

Concrete absorbs and releases heat real fast.

I have a feeling it could get as hot as an old brick pizza oven.

 

Yes Sir        Pizza oven or / Tropical Igloo. Would want wenting up top at least?        :coffee:

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sugbu777

We had looked at monolithic dome construction on Guam, but the set up here was really cost prohibitive. There is one monolithic that I know of in Merizo, Guam. It's looks pretty nice but it took the guy a long time to build. I'll try to find a pic of it and post. BTW it is in close proximity to shoreline, so I don't know how it would hold up in storm surge.

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sugbu777

Found a pic of the dome home in Merizo, Guam

 

post-15772-0-55481200-1483668601_thumb.jpg

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SumDumJoe

 Anyone know how well they stand up to earthquakes?

 The thought of sleeping directly under all that heavy concrete in an earthquake prone area would make me a little nervous.

 

 I have looked into the earth bag house idea several times. That really does seem to be the way to go here, if, you can get the permits to build one. I would really like to build one almost entirely underground to keep it cool, but I have a feeling I would be constantly battling mold and fungus. Plus I imagine it could flood during a serious rain storm. 

 

 One other issue to think about with these atypical homes is insurance. Many insurance companies will not take on unknown risks. They have tons of computer models that can calculate the risk of insuring a normal brick and mortar or stick home. They don't have enough data to figure out how much to charge in premiums to make sure they don't lose money if something catastrophic happens to your house. 

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oztony

I would think that it would stand up reasonably well in an earthquake , possibly better than a conventional type structure ,

 

Being dome shaped would give it equal force/pressure around the structure , unlike conventional building with corners/right angles .... JMO.

Edited by oztony
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Paul

 

 

Anyone know how well they stand up to earthquakes?

 

Perhaps a bit prejudiced, but this may help? 

 

http://www.monolithic.org/benefits/benefits-survivability


 

 

how it would hold up in storm surge.

 

http://www.monolithic.org/plandesign-residential/wind-water-corrosion-and-monolithic-domes

 

http://www.monolithic.org/benefits/benefits-survivability/surviving-hurricanes-and-tornadoes

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Badwolverine7

Are there any new updates as to the market of building a done home in the Philippines???

I found one Facebook site that built dome homes but they have not posted in months.  Everything that I have found on this subject is old and out dated.  I have a girlfriend that lives in Manila but wouldn't want to live there.  Any new info would be very helpful.

Thanks,

 

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