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Paul

Monolithic Dome Construction Anyone?

Dome House Construction  

88 members have voted

  1. 1. How likely would you be to build a home like this?

    • I will definitely go with this type of construction.
      6
    • I like this and will most likely build a dome home.
      4
    • I'm interested in looking into this a bit further.
      23
    • I would consider this, but not sure at this time.
      12
    • It is doubtful that I would build a dome home.
      19
    • I would not consider this type of construction.
      24


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JohnFromTexas

I'd rather have my own hobbit hole :P

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HHammer

We built a house similar to this for a guy near Nimbin in NSW back home...

3 interconnected domes 9 meters diameter each.

Used compacted clay dirt from his property to form the domes, steeled up and then used shotcrete to cover everything to a thickness of 150mm ( 6 inches ) he then used a small bobcat to remove most of the dirt to cover his home and grew grass on it... looked kind of cool in a hippy kind of way.... and the actual cost was pretty low ( around $50k ), crete was $105 cubic meter plus $40 to spray it ( mates rates ) mesh was about $60 per sheet and the sling lots of bar was about $100?

The interesting thing was it was cool in summer and warm in winter with a foot of dirt over it.... could be doable here.....

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fanboat

We built a house similar to this for a guy near Nimbin in NSW back home...

3 interconnected domes 9 meters diameter each.

Used compacted clay dirt from his property to form the domes, steeled up and then used shotcrete to cover everything to a thickness of 150mm ( 6 inches ) he then used a small bobcat to remove most of the dirt to cover his home and grew grass on it... looked kind of cool in a hippy kind of way.... and the actual cost was pretty low ( around $50k ), crete was $105 cubic meter plus $40 to spray it ( mates rates ) mesh was about $60 per sheet and the sling lots of bar was about $100?

The interesting thing was it was cool in summer and warm in winter with a foot of dirt over it.... could be doable here.....

 

 

The last domme I built was in Alaska....all built of ice....cost was one barrel of whiskey!

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HHammer

We built a house similar to this for a guy near Nimbin in NSW back home...

3 interconnected domes 9 meters diameter each.

Used compacted clay dirt from his property to form the domes, steeled up and then used shotcrete to cover everything to a thickness of 150mm ( 6 inches ) he then used a small bobcat to remove most of the dirt to cover his home and grew grass on it... looked kind of cool in a hippy kind of way.... and the actual cost was pretty low ( around $50k ), crete was $105 cubic meter plus $40 to spray it ( mates rates ) mesh was about $60 per sheet and the sling lots of bar was about $100?

The interesting thing was it was cool in summer and warm in winter with a foot of dirt over it.... could be doable here.....

 

 

The last domme I built was in Alaska....all built of ice....cost was one barrel of whiskey!

 

Alaska, isnt that the place where theres snow? and ice? and snow?

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Jeff08

I live 30 miles from the Monolithic HQ and am interested in building one. They are cool in the Texas heat and would be great in the islands for security also. Here in the states you can help people build their home and they do the same for you...like a barn raising.

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Dave and Chona

I think these domes could have great potential in the Philippines. Regarding usable space, why not build a circular wall say 4' high first and sit your dome on top of that. then you could get your furniture against a wall. I have also seen domes that have a large hole in the top of them like a smoke hole for a tepee, which can be opened or closed as you wish for release of heat etc. As I am thinking of building a small resort in the future, I am seiously considering putting half a dozen on the beach especially as they are typhoon proof.

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Stranded Shipscook

This is an interesting thread, i think i'll try that one out for my cottage plans in the future. Now the balloon would be a primary problem. But since it can be used over and over, it may be worth to consider.

Or maybe somebody has got a balloon ?

 

Anyone ?

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gcurious

I did quite a bit of research on these dome homes.............they are almost INDESTRUCTIBLE, meaning they are very strong, fire-resistant, termite resistant...........LOW maintenance. Actually, if designed and decorated properly, they are really quite attractive looking homes. Since labor is relatively cheap here, building custom furniture and cabinets would not be very expensive.

 

 

BUT.......even though concrete is very cheap here...............these Dome homes need a specialized, light-weight concrete........EXPENSIVE.............

 

 

AND.......to construct to Monolithic standards........you will need specialized equipment also..........very expensive to buy.....very expensive to mantain.

 

 

I was seriously thinking about these type of homes here in the Philippines, until I realized the cost of the specialized cement and euipment.

 

 

It might still be a possiblility in the future.....if you have some investors, wanting to build a dome home subdivision or community.

 

 

For just a few homes, it would be quite expensive, but for larger scale developments, I believe these are great homes .

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Stranded Shipscook

I did quite a bit of research on these dome homes.............they are almost INDESTRUCTIBLE, meaning they are very strong, fire-resistant, termite resistant...........LOW maintenance. Actually, if designed and decorated properly, they are really quite attractive looking homes. Since labor is relatively cheap here, building custom furniture and cabinets would not be very expensive.

 

 

BUT.......even though concrete is very cheap here...............these Dome homes need a specialized, light-weight concrete........EXPENSIVE.............

 

 

AND.......to construct to Monolithic standards........you will need specialized equipment also..........very expensive to buy.....very expensive to mantain.

 

 

I was seriously thinking about these type of homes here in the Philippines, until I realized the cost of the specialized cement and euipment.

 

 

It might still be a possiblility in the future.....if you have some investors, wanting to build a dome home subdivision or community.

 

 

For just a few homes, it would be quite expensive, but for larger scale developments, I believe these are great homes .

 

Light weight ecement, mmmh, maybe with a bit of extra "rebar" this could be fixed. I am not a static engineer, but as it seems, the static of a "ball" is by physical laws higher than he one of just a flat ceiling (Which i have in my house.)

Now to the building codes of the Philippines, this maybe the larger problem, as one may or may not need statical calculations...i will inquire at some contractors/municiplalitis and check in the next days.

 

( Note- i am just thinking in a 20ft maximum diameter category)

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KennyF

The problem with fitting out a dome is very real. My brother used to sell octagonal homes and even that was a problem.

Maybe this pic shows a way to have upendickular walls in a dome.

post-4822-0-94371700-1312684330_thumb.jpg

 

KonGC

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gcurious

Gunite and Shotcrete were the 2 "lightweight" concretes that Monolithic was recommending at the time. There are other options to choose from today.

 

The equipment and materials needed really add a lot to the cost......Airform, anchors, large powerful fan to inflate airform..and maintain pressure while dome is being built, a special mixer to make cement smooth and fluid, the cement pump itself is expensive, high pressure hose and nozzles for spraying. Mixer, pump, hoses and nozzles will fail early if they are not maintained properly. Monolithic recommends "experienced" users of this equipment, not amatuers.

 

You can check out monolithic.com and view the whole procedure and all the equipment and materials needed.....I probably left out some of them too.

 

 

 

Light weight ecement, mmmh, maybe with a bit of extra "rebar" this could be fixed. I am not a static engineer, but as it seems, the static of a "ball" is by physical laws higher than he one of just a flat ceiling (Which i have in my house.)

Now to the building codes of the Philippines, this maybe the larger problem, as one may or may not need statical calculations...i will inquire at some contractors/municiplalitis and check in the next days.

 

( Note- i am just thinking in a 20ft maximum diameter category)

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gcurious

Before leaving the US last year, I built a 21' diameter 8-sided building in my back yard. Its not a true dome home....because its octogonal.....but it was a good experience. It was my 1st time building something like this, used lots of steel rebar, hollow blocks with cement and steel....conduit for all plumbing and electrical........BUT i didn;t know how to build the roof....HEHEHE....the roof has wood framing with asphalt shingles, but many anchors embedded into the cement walls.

I expect it will still be standing when we are all gone........8" solid cement/steel walls, 14" solid cement steel floor..........i don't think its going anywhere.

10518_101967596487057_100000214508501_56368_7201591_a.jpg10518_101967609820389_100000214508501_56372_2621645_a.jpg10518_101967603153723_100000214508501_56370_5491062_a.jpg10518_101967779820372_100000214508501_56378_1840987_a.jpg

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Stranded Shipscook

Gunite and Shotcrete were the 2 "lightweight" concretes that Monolithic was recommending at the time. There are other options to choose from today.

 

The equipment and materials needed really add a lot to the cost......Airform, anchors, large powerful fan to inflate airform..and maintain pressure while dome is being built, a special mixer to make cement smooth and fluid, the cement pump itself is expensive, high pressure hose and nozzles for spraying. Mixer, pump, hoses and nozzles will fail early if they are not maintained properly. Monolithic recommends "experienced" users of this equipment, not amatuers.

 

You can check out monolithic.com and view the whole procedure and all the equipment and materials needed.....I probably left out some of them too.

 

 

 

 

 

this is mainly my concern as well. I think it could be only feasable in mass production, which brings me to an idea of low cost housing.

However, after studying all links and others, the idea of dome construction is mainly (in the cost efficiency) that they can be erected with unskilled laor in a short time.

A factor which can be neglected a little, as labor in the Philippines is cheap and abundant. On my own house construction they only made up 10 percent of the entire costs. ( 240 sqm, 2 story building for 650k, 2 months construction time with 30k monthly costs for labor.)

I looked into the cottage option and got quotes for about less than 100k for fully build RTO (ready to occupy) bungalows. All concrete, two store possibility due to flat concrete deck roof ) as much as i love the individualism of domes, i can not get the figures lower... sigh...

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Jess Bartone

Regarding usable space, why not build a circular wall say 4' high first and sit your dome on top of that. then you could get your furniture against a wall. I have also seen domes that have a large hole in the top of them like a smoke hole for a tepee, which can be opened or closed as you wish for release of heat etc.

 

You mean like this Australian made dome kit home in Thailand? Worth a look at their website for dome enthusiasts, very cheap and very well made.

 

20070713DomeHomeProgress2W.jpg

 

Sunken lounge room... I imagine it would be fairly cool sitting in that hole.

 

20070713DomeHomeProgress6W.jpg

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Stranded Shipscook

You mean like this Australian made dome kit home in Thailand? Worth a look at their website for dome enthusiasts, very cheap and very well made.

 

20070713DomeHomeProgress2W.jpg

 

Sunken lounge room... I imagine it would be fairly cool sitting in that hole.

 

20070713DomeHomeProgress6W.jpg

 

A masterpice, very beautiful. The problem in Cebu is the available and suitable lumber. Lumber became so expensive here, that it is cheaper to import it from Australia.

(As done a few months ago by the Japanese when they rebuild my Resto with tropical hardwoods.)

 

But certainly something to look into for guys living in Mindanao, where one still can get lumber a lot cheaper.

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