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Paul

Monolithic Dome Construction Anyone?

Dome House Construction  

88 members have voted

  1. 1. How likely would you be to build a home like this?

    • I will definitely go with this type of construction.
      6
    • I like this and will most likely build a dome home.
      4
    • I'm interested in looking into this a bit further.
      23
    • I would consider this, but not sure at this time.
      12
    • It is doubtful that I would build a dome home.
      19
    • I would not consider this type of construction.
      24


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loosehead

I don't think dome construction is suited to the tropics. The type of house M Morey describes with wide eaves, covered patios, breezeways, high ceilings seems to me to be the way to go. The most comfortable house I have stayed in the Phils had a flat concrete roof then another pitched roof on top of that with nipa (or whetever hey use) to stop the concrete heating up. It had timber louvres (jealousy) on the upstairs that could be opened to take advantage of any breeze. No aircon needed, just fans. I imagine it would be incredibly hot in a dome house in the Phils.

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hoz
ever seen EarthShips?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthship

made out of recycled car tyres... they are made with dirt packed inside.. perfect insulation... incredible idea..

 

 

brighton-earthship.jpg

 

Theres an interesting film (Garbage Warrior) on Earthships and the Architect, Mike Reynolds, who developed the systems. He has had a lot of flack from New Mexico and the national association of Architects, at one time his licenses were taken away.

 

After the tsunami and earthquake he was approached by the Andaman Islands in India to come and teach local architects how to build small self sustainable homes for their people, anyone left alive were living on the street or in ugly, hot one room GI sheet shacks. Water had to be trucked in.

 

He brought his crew and built a demonstration home of stuffed tires, plastic bottles, bamboo and concrete. A cistern was installed underneath the floor, all rainwater was directed there. When they were done they had a house that was not only aesthetically pleasing, but self cooled and gathered it's own water for the inhabitants.

 

When he returned to the US the national board offered to reinstate his license and he eventually got New Mexico to allow him to develop and build alternate housing on two sites in Taos.

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Huck Finn
A dome house would be a curiosity here. I am just trying to blend in and I would not want to draw any more attention to myself than is necessary. I would consider building a dome house in a cold climate in rural America, but not here in Cebu. My modest ranch style house in Cebu (still under construction) is one story, three bedroom, one bath, 112 sqm with a simple design. The roof overhang is 1.5 meters. My front porch is 3 meters by 14 meters and goes entirely across the front of the house. I think a house that provides lots of shade is better suited to the tropics.

 

Tor in Cebu

 

I tend to agree with this post. I like a feeling of openess with plenty of sunlight and fresh air. The geodesic dome to me is claustrophobic and aesthically is not as inviting as other designs. There is also the problem of incorporating furniture, appliances, pictures, etc. in a circular domicile. I think you would eventually grow tired of the novelty of living in this home and you may not find a buyer. Just my opinion... :welcome:

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Huck Finn
That's very interesting - dome construction.

 

I recall a book I read a while ago, entitled "Black Elk Speaks". He was a famous medicine man/Shaman in the mid/late 1800's.

 

Somewhere in it, Black Elk discusses how white man's square built structures have taken away spiritual and other energies that we would otherwise

have in a domed house or structure.

 

That's another reason why North American Indian tepee's are shaped (with the base & walls) as a circle.

 

Many other indigenous tribes have or still use circular construction, see Mongolian Yurts for another great example.

 

Yes, and they all go crazy looking for a corner to poop in! :welcome:

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ayala
That's very interesting - dome construction.

 

I recall a book I read a while ago, entitled "Black Elk Speaks". He was a famous medicine man/Shaman in the mid/late 1800's.

 

Somewhere in it, Black Elk discusses how white man's square built structures have taken away spiritual and other energies that we would otherwise

have in a domed house or structure.

 

That's another reason why North American Indian tepee's are shaped (with the base & walls) as a circle.

 

Many other indigenous tribes have or still use circular construction, see Mongolian Yurts for another great example.

 

Excellent reading-"Black Elk Speaks".The wisdom of the native american was so much more advanced then even todays science,no books,no gadgets,no sophistcated equipment-they deeply explored the inner world while white man explores the outer mostly.they lived the vision of 7 generations,never taking more then needed to live and using all they took and always with a vision of leaving all for 7 generations and on and on as they moved there teepees and other natural material strucrures from one location to the next.They knew all energy moves in circles.Even today they know that radon moves in circles and get trapped in corners of square or rectangular buildings.The ancient Rishi's self realized the deepest of the deep thousands of years ago and only now science is coming to terms with these great truths wondering how they did this.Its all in each of us.post-4460-1241328504_thumb.jpg

Edited by ayala

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mattwilkie
I don't think dome construction is suited to the tropics. The type of house M Morey describes with wide eaves, covered patios, breezeways, high ceilings seems to me to be the way to go. The most comfortable house I have stayed in the Phils had a flat concrete roof then another pitched roof on top of that with nipa (or whetever hey use) to stop the concrete heating up. It had timber louvres (jealousy) on the upstairs that could be opened to take advantage of any breeze. No aircon needed, just fans. I imagine it would be incredibly hot in a dome house in the Phils.

 

My current house has a 1st floor which is open sided with a billard table and bar with a metal roof suspended on pillars. Airflow is good up there aswell as reducing heat on our house below due to the huge void. Works well..

 

Dome house i think it will depend on its location as if you head further up into the mountains for example heat really isnt too much of an issue.

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NoPera

I thought long and hard about possibly building a dome and am cooling on the idea. The biggest appeal is it's resistance to typhoons. Put one on some concrete pilings and you could ride out the worst of storms. Unfortunately the downsides probably override this admirable trait.

1. You need to import the airform and find a fan to inflate it with.

2. You need someone proficient in Shotcrete.

3. Local labor likely has no experience with this type of structure.

4. You'd probably have trouble with permits.

5. If you like solar power and/or rainwater catchment the shape is a disadvantage.

 

Noting a couple of points made earlier in the thread.

-A monolithic dome and a geodesic dome are two different things.

-Passive cooling is dependent on orientation of the house to the prevailing breeze and the ability to create a "chimney effect" within the house. Having large overhangs on a hip-shape roof, high ceilings with a cupola and vents. ceiling fans and relatively low opening for air to enter the structure will keep it reasonably cool inside.

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JamesMusslewhite

Have been interested in Monolithic Domes for years. I was introduced to them by a good friend about 10 years back. He went to a school to learn how to construct them at a school in Texas. I do know that you get more living space per square inch than any other structure, and once built can tolerate sustained winds in excess of 300 mph. This is the company that he took the courses with. http://www.monolithic.com/ I always thought they would make excellent little beach resort dwellings.

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Paul

To All Concerned:

 

Upon browsing this thread again, I noticed the link to the (pdf) construction manual was no longer valid.

 

I rang up Monolithic and spoke with Kelly Lewis. She emailed me the new link, as they made some major changes to the http://www.monolithic.com website, since the original post was made.

 

I have updated the original post on this topic.

 

Thanks,

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fredanna

I don't thnk I would want to live in a house that the "Tele Tubbies" live in. LOL

If you have children watching PBS ,you'll get the drift.

 

Fred :D

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fanboat

I seen some very big dome homes in California,that were magnificent...the high ceilings,the hall ways from one dometo the next,skylites water falls and the like.

It takes a big foot print s these homes were build out in the country(2.5 acres or more)

 

I would use a concrete post and beam system...and cover with a tatch roof system,so it had the native look...for cooling I would use plenty of openings nd huge custom ceiling fans...the ceiling would be 40 feet high....a loft would fit in nicely...the foot print would be 60 feet.

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sam12six

This is totaly surreal!! Same kind of thing,only with sand bags and barbed wire!! With this method it seems you can have 5 /6 ft high walls before the domed roof takes shape. its obvioiusy possible to render the interior and exterior too as in picture.

 

http://archnet.org/library/sites/one-site.tcl?site_id=8219

 

Anyone know if this depth of sand would be a good heat insulator?

 

I've uploaded a book that tells you everything you ever wanted to know about this kind of construction. It's about 18-and-a-half megs.

 

You can download it here:

http://www.mediafire.com/?ngugnwtdcj2

 

 

This is the book's listing on Amazon so you know what you're downloading.

 

Amazon link

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SkyMan

I have to admit, I'm surprised. I thought more people would look at this considering the ease of building these units.

Round or curved structures are notoriously difficult to work with decorating. Even those with vertical walls. Domes are even worse because the walls angle in. Why do you think they didn't catch on in the states? The first floor of a two story dome would have somewhat vertical walls though even then you would have to give up the outter 2 to 3 feet as nearly useless, but the second floor would be so much more a problem. Beds, couches, cabinets, TVs, entertainment centers, etc. all lend themselves to a right angled design.

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Paul

I added a YouTube Video from Monolithic, showing how they will build homes in developing countries.

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broden

i could put a dome on top of what we want to build .. then it would look like a mosque

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