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Update on the SRRV available to U.S. military members/Vets married or not


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NOSOCALPINOY
Here's a post I found on another forum explaining/sharing his personal experience concerning this SRRV available to  U.S. military members/Vets retired or not and or married or not.
Just yesterday, I had a personal phone conversation with a nice lady from the Makati PRA office who was mentioned in this post below, who this nice lady help process Paul Miller's SRRV last year. 
 
Here's his story, a very interesting read for those single guys just having a DD214 and want to permanently stay in the Philippines without being married to a Filipina.
 
Paul Francis Miller says: February 28, 2014 at 2:41 pm I went to the Philippines Retirement Authority on Paseo de Roxas in Manila today to inquire about the retirement visas available for U.S. citizens. I didn’t have to wait more than five minutes before a lovely, courteous woman brought out all the necessary forms and explained everything orderly and completely. But…she took the initiative to ask if I were a veteran. When I said, “Yes,” she said, “Well then you can forget about the $10,000 deposit. Does $1,500 sound better to you?” Ha ha Any gift of $8,500 sounds fine to me. She did think, though, that one had to be a retiree, but took my DD 214 (I was prepared) to her boss and came back with a thumbs up gesture. She did make clear that because I had not served in the Philippines, my annual fee would be the $360 instead of the $10 it would otherwise be. So you can add Naricris B. Sison to the list of PRA officers who are fully aware of the veterans’ eligibility for the SRRV Courtesy visa. 
Reply Paul Francis Miller says: February 28, 2014 at 2:48 pm Now that I reread my message, I want to state explicitly that I am NOT a retiree, just a three-year veteran, and that she was thumbs-upping about my eligibility. 
Paul Francis Miller
 
 
Also here's a copy of the email I received just yesterday from this nice lady mentioned in this post above.
I just got off the phone using Skype and spoke with a nice lady PRA Rep at the PRA Makati office and she explained to me that the SRRV aka the EXPANDED version for U.S. retired military is still available and on going. Here below is a copy of her email and attachment. (you may not be able to download or view the attachments).
I guess I have the charm about me and can get the information I need by speaking Taglish with these PRA Reps at the Makati office.

clientrelation ([email protected]
To: [email protected]

[email protected] 

4 attachments (total 848.5 KB)
SRRV EXPANDED Program for U.S. retired military
https://blu184.mail.live.com/mail/ViewOfficePreview.aspx?messageid=mg_SUbraPk5BGJbAAjfeSlxA2&folderid=flinbox&attindex=0&cp=-1&attdepth=0&n=16956763
Application_Form_for_Principal_-_English.pdf
Medical_Form.pdf
DBP_Remittance_Instruction_Form.pdf
 
Thank you for your email and interest in the retirement program of the Philippine government. You are applying under the SRRV Expanded for retired US military personnel for 50 years old and above. Kindly see the attached list of requirements including the forms.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RE:clientrelation  Add to contacts  5:08 AM  Apr 16, 2015
[email protected]

The SRRV Expanded Courtesy is still available for foreigners 50 years old and above retired from military service. Please refer to the list of requirements in my previous email. Thank you.

Very truly yours,

NARICRIS B. SISON
Market Specialist
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I'm for sure qualified, because I did 4 yrs of bar hopping in Angeles City and Subic, Olongapo in the late 60s and survived it all.  So, if I go ahead and get an SRRV, my annual report will only cost

I think its a great idea I wonder why the usa don't do the same make ever person put up cash to live in the us... and if they started charging 100 us if you want to leave the country they can raise a

Yeah, I did some of that barroom duty!    LOL   Thank God those days are over and I lived thru them.       

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cybersquat

 

 

She did make clear that because I had not served in the Philippines, my annual fee would be the $360 instead of the $10 it would otherwise be.

 

I wonder if serving a short stint (TAD) in the jet shop (between Vietnam tours) at Cubi Point would qualify as serving in the Philippines?

 

If not, surely all the time spent in or about Olongapo bars/hotels, etc would qualify as service? :P

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SkyMan
You do not have to be retired military, just be a veteran. The cost is the $1,400 USD application fee and a $1,500 USD deposit in an authorized Philippine Bank. Also, all the documentation requirements must be completed. Concerning the annual fee, some will pay $10 USD and some will pay $360, depending on if you served 2 years in the Philippines, in some capacity.

 

Read more at: http://retiringtothephilippines.com/living-in-the-philippines/new-courtesy-srrv-veterans/

 

I'd consider it if it weren't for the $360/yr.  The p3K to leave the country sucks but I'm not going to pay p15K+ to avoid it.  I don't fly out that often.

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I wonder if serving a short stint (TAD) in the jet shop (between Vietnam tours) at Cubi Point would qualify as serving in the Philippines?

 

If not, surely all the time spent in or about Olongapo bars/hotels, etc would qualify as service? :P

 

Yeah, I did some of that barroom duty!    LOL   Thank God those days are over and I lived thru them.    :yahoo:  :yahoo:  :yahoo:

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NOSOCALPINOY

I'm for sure qualified, because I did 4 yrs of bar hopping in Angeles City and Subic, Olongapo in the late 60s and survived it all. 

So, if I go ahead and get an SRRV, my annual report will only cost me $10

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I would interested to hear how this turns out. I spent 3 plus years at Subic but did not retire from the Navy. I was not aware there was such a program.

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ex231

Good and useful info for some, but not new. I heard about that program a few years ago but wasn't interested. Unless you served here I don't really see it as being a big deal for most. I didn't and I'd rather take the $360 per year and buy plane tickets for my wife and I to somewhere else once a year instead of giving it to the kind and deserving Philippine gov't, then re enter on a BB.

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cybersquat

So what is considered "serving" in the Philippines? Anyone know?

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NOSOCALPINOY

I would interested to hear how this turns out. I spent 3 plus years at Subic but did not retire from the Navy. I was not aware there was such a program.

That's why I posted the up to date OP for guys just like you and or anyone else who is qualified. 

The minimum requirement - an original DD214 in hand, even though not retired. That is the one minimum requirement that was just recently clarified and verified by the PRA Makati office, which is included in my OP. 

It also comes in handy for those who are still single and do not plan on getting married.

Tourist visa extensions for singles can get expensive for those long stay in the Philippines. 

This SRRV is good if one is a qualified single person, retiree or not, married or not and decides to live in the Philippines permanently for whatever his/her reason(s) may be.  

I'm just the messenger to get the latest current info out to all who it may help! 

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SkyMan
This SRRV is good if one is a qualified single person, retiree or not, married or not and decides to live in the Philippines permanently for whatever his/her reason(s) may be.

I would say not for married.  The 13A is still the way to go if married to a Filipina.  Married to something else though, you're probably right.  After 2 years of paying that $360 each year you've pretty much paid for a 13A but with an SRRV you need to continue paying the $360/year.  And that doesn't even consider the $2900 up front.  I'd consider it if I had the $10 annual though.  I spent 2 years servicing Clark computers from Hickam, I wonder if they'd count that.

 

So what is considered "serving" in the Philippines? Anyone know?

I would imagine your DD214 would have to say you were assigned here for a total of more than 2 years.  If you could manage to find TDY orders totaling that it would also count.

Edited by SkyMan
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ex231

 

 

Tourist visa extensions for singles can get expensive for those long stay in the Philippines. 

 

Maybe I'm missing something but I see the tourist visa option for a single guy only costing around $100 a year more than this retirement visa. Of course with the tourist visa you're married to the BI office. I heard about this program before I came here and considered it but figured that in my case there was no real benefit and I'd have some money tied up here. Granted, not much money but if I got a wild hair to leave one day I wanted to be able to just go and not be bothered with loose ends.

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NOSOCALPINOY

Maybe I'm missing something but I see the tourist visa option for a single guy only costing around $100 a year more than this retirement visa. Of course with the tourist visa you're married to the BI office. I heard about this program before I came here and considered it but figured that in my case there was no real benefit and I'd have some money tied up here. Granted, not much money but if I got a wild hair to leave one day I wanted to be able to just go and not be bothered with loose ends.

As I have already explained in my OP, this SRRV visa should only be considered if one plans to reside in the Philippines permanently! It's not for those always on the go to different countries and have no plans on staying in the Philippines indefinitely.

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NOSOCALPINOY

Maybe I'm missing something but I see the tourist visa option for a single guy only costing around $100 a year more than this retirement visa. 

Tourist visa extensions cost more than $100 a year more than this SRRV? I don't know, haven't done the math yet. What's your numbers for this SRRV? A $2,900 one time fee plus annual fee of $10 or $360? So how do you figure the monthly or annual cost of a SRRV when there's only the annual fee left? 

 

http://www.immigration.gov.ph/index.php/visa-requirements/non-immigrant-visa/temporary-visitor-visa/extension-of-authorized-stay-beyond-59-days

 

If you need to stay any longer than 59 days as the extension from 59 days to 4 months is now approximately P7600. Made up of

- P4830 Extension fee including express lane

- $50 for an ACR-I card

- P500 express lane fee for the ACR-I card.

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ex231

Tourist visa extensions cost more than $100 a year more than this SRRV? I don't know, haven't done the math yet. What's your numbers for this SRRV? A $2,900 one time fee plus annual fee of $10 or $360? So how do you figure the monthly or annual cost of a SRRV when there's only the annual fee left? 

 

http://www.immigration.gov.ph/index.php/visa-requirements/non-immigrant-visa/temporary-visitor-visa/extension-of-authorized-stay-beyond-59-days

 

If you need to stay any longer than 59 days as the extension from 59 days to 4 months is now approximately P7600. Made up of

- P4830 Extension fee including express lane

- $50 for an ACR-I card

- P500 express lane fee for the ACR-I card.

 

Seems I was paying 2830p every 60 days for a tourist visa extension. The ACR card was like you said, about $50 once a year plus the 500p for the non existent "express lane", so roughly 20.5k per year. A "special" retirement visa will cost a single guy right at 16k per year according to your numbers plus the "one time $2900 fee". Add to that the $1500 or whatever it is you must keep on deposit. So yeah, for a single guy a regular tourist visa is about about $100 per year more than the special Peenoy deal. Of course the married guy would fare better.

So to recap, a single guy would have to fork over $4400 ($1500 I assume he could get back after jumping through some hoops) to save $100 per year. If you were to change your mind and leave say after a couple of years then you'd lose all the way around. I did the math on this before I came here.

The only "deal" is a Balikbayan stamp and as you know there is no $2900 fee to set up and not even a $10 yearly "fee". Just leave the country once a year with your wife which I do anyway.

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smokey

I think its a great idea I wonder why the usa don't do the same make ever person put up cash to live in the us... and if they started charging 100 us if you want to leave the country they can raise a few hundred million more to help the homeless vets..

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