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Helping Filipino/as Finish High School


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Undoubtedly you have met Filipino citizens who have no high school diploma but who are 20+ .

 

How do you help them? Where do you send them? How much do you pay? Who do you call?

 

There are two main questions:

 

1) Is there a program - an accelerated program which allows them to finish HS in an accelerated manner- so you don't have to send them for two years. I understand the government has such a program. Where is it? Who do you contact? Is there a private equivalent? What is the Philippine GED?

 

Is it possible to still send them to a TESDA ( or other) vocational school without the pesky HS diploma and just leave it at that? Because most employers prefer HS graduates. What's the scoop?

 

I am interested in your stories/anecdotes in Cebu but also in other parts of the country, especially in Angeles City or Manila.

 

I run into people like that all the time. Filipinos I ask have no idea how to help them.

 

 

 

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Headshot

Pretty much all of the public high schools here have night classes for adults. That was how my SIL finished high school.

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Pretty much all of the public high schools here have night classes for adults. That was how my SIL finished high school.

Are these accelerated? How much are the costs if they cost anything?

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Bill H

There are alternative school programs in most school districts.  I helped a boy who dropped out of school in the 6th grade through graduating high school in our local school district.  The diploma is accredited and can be used to apply for college or vocational school.  It took him two years to go from 6th grade to high school graduate.  The cost was laughably low.  That said, I don't think they really learn all that much, but they do end up with a real diploma.  He was 22 years old when he started the program, by the way.  A lot of girls who dropped out of school to have babies seem to participate.

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Headshot

Are these accelerated? How much are the costs if they cost anything?

 

Night school is just regular public high school for those that didn't graduate when they should have. The costs are the same as for regular public high school. In other words, they have to buy their own materials and they buy and wear the same uniforms as the daytime students. They have to take all of the classes they missed after they dropped out of school. There is no acceleration by dropping classes, but maybe the classes are shorter. Basically, they are given credit for where they were when they quit, and they go from there. Most of the night school students are maids who are working during the day while going back to school at night, so I'm sure it would be heaven for a young man, but they still need to keep their eye on the prize if they actually want to graduate.

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Skywalker

My friends 16 yo brother graduated HS last week. This was an interesting project. He was 14 when I met him, and he was already in bad company, staying out all hours, going to cock fights with his useless father, and I suspect dabbling with drugs.

 

I figured he was a good kid, in a bad situation. I took him out of his school, separated him from his loser friends, and put him in a private school (surprisingly cheap at about 1300 pesos a term) and covered his expenses. The turnaround was extraordinary. Much better than I expected. My feeling that he was essentially a good kid, easily led, was confirmed.

 

The next step is to get him into vocational training. He's not University material, but I suspect he will make a good mechanic.

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Tullioz

In addition to what has been mentioned already there are several schools that off HS programs on Sunday.  This works well for older students who need to work during the week and also for young girls who have children. It is easier for them to find someone to watch their child one day a week rather than several nights a week. Some of these schools have full scholarships for street children and those who have no means of paying the tuition. For those who do not qualify the costs are minimal. They will need uniforms and school supplies which are inexpensive and you can find places where the tuition ranges from P500 to P1,000 per month. At least that is the case here in Davao.

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shadow

We have two young people who just graduated, girl 19, boy 21. They went to regular high school with kids much younger than them. Cost was very low. The Philippines is now giving 12 years of schooling (I won't refer to it as "education") instead of 10, so that may effect your anticipated timeline.

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miles-high

I am interested in your stories/anecdotes in Cebu but also in other parts of the country, especially in Angeles City or Manila.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_Learning_System_%28Philippines%29

 

I think they finish in 2 to 3 semesters, cost around PHP750 per semester plus materials in Angeles. Friend's GF went through last year but I am not 100% sure of the cost... 

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bargeman

My friends 16 yo brother graduated HS last week. This was an interesting project. He was 14 when I met him, and he was already in bad company, staying out all hours, going to cock fights with his useless father, and I suspect dabbling with drugs.

 

I figured he was a good kid, in a bad situation. I took him out of his school, separated him from his loser friends, and put him in a private school (surprisingly cheap at about 1300 pesos a term) and covered his expenses. The turnaround was extraordinary. Much better than I expected. My feeling that he was essentially a good kid, easily led, was confirmed.

 

The next step is to get him into vocational training. He's not University material, but I suspect he will make a good mechanic.

Very commendable Skywalker.

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Skywalker

 

 

Very commendable Skywalker.

 

hush - don't tell anyone, it will ruin my dilettante playboy reputation.

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Headshot

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_Learning_System_%28Philippines%29

 

I think they finish in 2 to 3 semesters, cost around PHP750 per semester plus materials in Angeles. Friend's GF went through last year but I am not 100% sure of the cost... 

 

How long it takes to finish is dependent on what grade level they had completed when they dropped out of school. There is no "one size fits all" scenario. On Cebu, night school is free (no tuition), and is conducted after-hours in the regular public schools. Students are assessed on entering the program, and placed accordingly.

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arentol

Just a short commentary on some of my experiences.

 

I think giving an opportunity to anyone is a commendable action, especially when giving the gift of education. There are doubtlessly many Filipinos who have benefited from the generosity of Westerners in terms of their tuition being paid for. Not to be a downer, but I do want to mention that there are some Filipinos who will throw away every opportunity... even when handed to them on a silver platter.

 

We've made the mistake of assisting a helper or two with their educational costs, even putting one helper through college. Invariably, they end-up getting pregnant during the process... somehow it's always right before graduation. These girls come from similar backgrounds: their parents and grandparents never attended college, and they come from environments where marriage & children is the hallmark of success in life -- education and a career is not even on the list.

 

We made some mistakes and lost some money, though our hearts were in the right place. If we applied the wisdom above before investing in them, then we wouldn't have wasted the money. Honestly, though, it's not about the money -- the tuition was quite small. It's more about accepting the sad reality that, even when given opportunities unheard-of in their rural barangays, the value will always be dismissed in favor of their myopic traditions.

 

I think it's a good lesson for Westerners to learn, particularly Americans... whose culture says that everyone wants to excel in life if only they had the opportunity. Well, it's not as simple as that. Sometimes people have a different concept of "excelling in life" and success for them is defined as being a wife and mother, even if they don't have the money to support those aspirations. Illogical as it is, that's the reality.

 

 

Cheers,

Aren

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Skywalker

 

 

success for them is defined as being a wife and mother

 

BOOM!

 

I couldn't agree more.  I sponsor boys in school, because boys don't get pregnant (not even with synthetic babies).  Not yet anyway.

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