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Looking for Ideas on 'Green' Home Cooling


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rainymike

I guess heat and humidity is one of the things many of us have to adjust to living in the Phils. Easy enough to add air conditioning, but I'm looking for 'green' alternatives. My observations so far. Would like to know your actual experiences.

 

1. Two story homes - heat rises and the upstairs are like ovens here. But the downstairs remains fairly cool and I find fans more than adequate during the day. How can I achieve the same effect with a one story home? 

 

2. Vegetation - in older subdivisions, there tends to be a lot of trees. More breezes tend to blow through that a bare new subdivision.

 

3. Rooftop fans? - have seen a small number of homes with exhaust fans. Are these a significant help for home cooling? Are there solar powered models? Would these be a good idea for the vertical walls?

 

4. Wall/flooring - hollow tile brick walls, concrete flooring seem to help keep the home cooler.

 

5. Roofing material - is there something that works well here?

 

Anyway, am open to practical ideas based on real experiences and not so much theory. 

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Angle the house so that the wind flows through the house. The houses here that use the wind are much cooler than those not situated to take advantage of it. Also choose a location that has good winds.

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Woolf

Paint he house and roof white

 

as they do in southern spain

post-6705-0-26015200-1427499774_thumb.jpg

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easy44
Paint he house and roof white as they do in southern spain

 

Yes, absolutely.  I did that to my house and the difference is very noticeable.  The exterior of the house just doesn't heat up like it used to before I painted it, and so neither does the interior.  I have to shake my head when I see houses with dark colored roofs.  Aesthetically, maybe white isn't the best but I value comfort over looks any day, and white ain't all that bad.

Edited by easy44
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A_Simple_Man

Here's a green idea.  Have you seen some of the perimeter walls covered in an ivy-like plant?  Well how about this:

 

green-ivy-covered-house-ivy.jpg

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mydogbitjesus

wind tower

http://www.solaripedia.com/13/205/2094/wind_tower_modern_california_illustration.html

 

kind of like a cooling tower at a power station.

 

You want mass in your walls to stop the heat getting in, thicker the better, maybe start with 500mm solid wall, then concrete floor, which stays cool and acts like a refrigerator then add your cooling tower to suck out the hot air and get circulation going.

don't have many windows (or not too many big windows) you want to build a cave :)

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rainymike

wind tower

http://www.solaripedia.com/13/205/2094/wind_tower_modern_california_illustration.html

 

kind of like a cooling tower at a power station.

 

You want mass in your walls to stop the heat getting in, thicker the better, maybe start with 500mm solid wall, then concrete floor, which stays cool and acts like a refrigerator then add your cooling tower to suck out the hot air and get circulation going.

don't have many windows (or not too many big windows) you want to build a cave :)

 

This one is interesting. Thought those towers were too let the hot air rise and suck in the cooler air. It's actually the opposite.

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Humboldt

How about a high cupola roof design ? like they do in Hawaii , or what they call the China -Mans hat roof design, here is a pic of my little guest house overlooking sea big screened in window's ...

 

 

 

post-15417-0-36730600-1427507443_thumb.jpg

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Headshot

Build your home on a ridge or hill or next to cliffs or the sea (anywhere there is a constant breeze or wind). Alternatively, if you want to live in a condominium building, buy a corner unit as high up as possible (away from heat reflected up from the ground) that has windows on all exterior walls that can be opened to allow the breeze to blow through.

 

Paint your house a light color and choose a light colored roofing material (it doesn't have to be white to reduce heat absorption).

 

Ventilate your roof (ridge-line venting is best) to release heat buildup in any attic area.

 

Use forced ventilation (my father has a ceiling fan that comes on at 4 AM every morning to pull all of the stale air out of his home into the attic space...and then out through the roof). You can either use forced ventilation in the ceiling and passive ventilation in the roof or passive ventilation in the ceiling and forced ventilation in the ceiling. He has his big ceiling fan set to run automatically for ten minutes every morning at 4 AM (the coolest part of the night), but he can also turn it on manually at any time. He then closes the windows to capture the cool air (he goes to bed early and wakes early). The fan only needs to run for a short period of time to do its job. Alternatively, there are solar-powered roof vents that will run whenever there is light.

 

Over-insulate your walls, roof and ceilings (if the heat can't radiate in, it doesn't get hot inside).

 

Glaze your windows with reflective glass and double or triple glaze. In the West, they have triple-glazed windows that have some kind of gas (argon?) trapped between the panes that actually have insulating value, but I'm not sure you can get that here.

 

Use drapes on the windows that have white backing (toward the window), so that when the drapes are closed, the light is reflected back out. White sheers behind the curtains will help, but solid white backing is more effective.

 

Extend your roof eaves out as far as possible to shade the exterior walls during the hottest time of the day. Plant trees to shade the walls in the morning and afternoon, but keep them far enough away to prevent damage if there is a typhoon.

 

Use high cathedral ceilings with no attic space (you still want to over-insulate and ventilate the roof to pull warm air out of the house).

 

These are all green ways to cool your home, and you can combine different methods to create a much cooler home.

Edited by Headshot
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riklynbor

I guess heat and humidity is one of the things many of us have to adjust to living in the Phils. Easy enough to add air conditioning, but I'm looking for 'green' alternatives. My observations so far. Would like to know your actual experiences.

 

1. Two story homes - heat rises and the upstairs are like ovens here. But the downstairs remains fairly cool and I find fans more than adequate during the day. How can I achieve the same effect with a one story home? 

 

2. Vegetation - in older subdivisions, there tends to be a lot of trees. More breezes tend to blow through that a bare new subdivision.

 

3. Rooftop fans? - have seen a small number of homes with exhaust fans. Are these a significant help for home cooling? Are there solar powered models? Would these be a good idea for the vertical walls?

 

4. Wall/flooring - hollow tile brick walls, concrete flooring seem to help keep the home cooler.

 

5. Roofing material - is there something that works well here?

 

Anyway, am open to practical ideas based on real experiences and not so much theory.

 

After installing this roofing im pleased to say very little if any heat penetrated the 100mm thick insulated panels.

post-14249-0-28881500-1427512363_thumb.jpg

Here's a green idea.  Have you seen some of the perimeter walls covered in an ivy-like plant?  Well how about this:

 

green-ivy-covered-house-ivy.jpg

It sure is GREEN LOL

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colemanlee

I dont know if you guys will like this, it might be way to native for most but the house we are building is almost completely native with the exception of some common sense mods similar to the states and other country's..

 

House will be on concrete post foundation, walls (from outside in) will be, amalcan,plywood,studs with insulation,plywood, amalcan...roof, steeply pitched with about 3foot overhang...attic space well ventilated ...

 

The house I live in now is concrete, as have been all the ones I have lived in here...my relatives here all have houses constructed in various native style configurations..they seem to be at least ten degrees cooler and take advantage of natural breeze. 

 

Many here avoid wood construction because of termites but that can be controlled with various insecticides ...Ill post pictures when I get that far along

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rainymike

 

 

After installing this roofing im pleased to say very little if any heat penetrated the 100mm thick insulated panels.

 

What kind of material is that? I've seen a variety of materials being marketed. Was interested in some concrete/fiber material that was supposed to be both fire and bug resistant (for roofing and interior walls). Think it was Korean or Thai made.

 

I do think the natives had the right idea with their nipa huts. I'm inclined to favor a high roof. I don't really like the boxy low ceilings with an attic space above - at least I've not seen any that were of decent construction/materials.


Here's a green idea.  Have you seen some of the perimeter walls covered in an ivy-like plant?  Well how about this:

 

green-ivy-covered-house-ivy.jpg

 

LOL. That is certainly green. Used to have a wall covered in such a fashion. Was a pain in the butt to keep trimmed.

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RogerDat

Paint he house and roof white

 

as they do in southern spain

That roof is brown! Is your house already built? Do you have sofit and gabel  or ridge vents. Very cheep to modify adding them and they will help alot. Hollow block and tile collect heat all day, and raidate it all night. I used black fish netting (very cheep) to block suns rays on my front porch. Add foail/foam to bottom of roof if access is posiable, styrofoam like ( not strofoam) 4x8 x2" sheets on top of ceilling. It will melt, but not support flame, i have a supplier.

 

The cloth shop near Carbon sells umbrella material that is silver on one side, and various other colors on the other. They make great curtains, or curtain liners reflects a lot of heat, we use them.

Edited by RogerDat
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spydoo

Trees are green. They provide shade from the sun for buildings and the land underneath their leaves.

 

Further, they transevaporate water, which means they uptake water from their roots and release it from their stomata, allowing it to evaporate. This cools breezes passing over their leaves. Being the same system as evaporative cooling, it increases the humidity but decreases the temperature. 

 

On the other hand they decrease the loss of radiant heat at night, but overall they provide cooling benefits.

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Headshot
LOL. That is certainly green. Used to have a wall covered in such a fashion. Was a pain in the butt to keep trimmed.

 

Plus the fact that any plant that will cling to walls will also cause those walls to deteriorate fairly rapidly. There is an ivy-like plant that grows here that I considered for my perimeter walls, but my builder said, "don't do it or it will eat the wall", so I decided against it. It does make a really nice backdrop though.

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