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Scotsbloke

Innovative Home Designs

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KennyF

Looking at those photos I get the impression that "made from containers" means as much as "made from bricks"

There's way more materials than the base 4 containers in that build.

 

KonC

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Scotsbloke

Looking at those photos I get the impression that "made from containers" means as much as "made from bricks"

There's way more materials than the base 4 containers in that build.

 

KonC

Kenny, aside from the outside chimney there isn't.  Furthermore (and this is the only point where it becomes interesting in a Philippines context) the whole structure is resting on concrete pillars at each corner.  id est, there is not extensive groundworks/foundations to support the structure.

 

Now given the nature of the location and where the bloke wanted his home to be he had to remove a lot of earth/rock to make a level site....but it really is 4 shipping containers resting on about 8 small piers.

Edited by Scotsbloke

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Headshot

When you watch the video, you realize how much work there is to turn four shipping containers into a house. Of course, if he had stacked the containers like they want to be stacked, he could have gotten by with a lot less added structure and a much smaller budget. I know he was trying to make a statement with his house, but I think he still could have taken advantage of the views with balcony extensions, and he wouldn't have had to beef up the structure so much. The extra steel more than doubled the cost of the structure. The hammock-style bathtub was a bit over the top.

 

I have thought about building a container house at some point, but I would rather have a stucco finish on the outside and sheet rock on the inside. You can take advantage of the waffles on both sides of the exterior walls for greater insulation value that way. Having full wood framing on the inside of his walls to accommodate the insulation uses up precious interior space. It is an amazing build, though, and I think I will refer to it if and when I do my own build. There are a lot of lessons to be learned from this project.

 

I could imagine a two-container house going up in a similar place to the "nipa hut" build on the forums right now. But then...it wouldn't be the same house as the nipa hut. I'm not sure if that's good or bad.

Edited by Headshot

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Scotsbloke

Look at these exterior panels on the container house. Do they have any practical purpose or just decorative?

 

Casa+Manifesto+Recycled+shipping+contain

 

Photo source http://www.prefabcontainerhomes.org/2013/02/casa-manifesto-recycled-shipping.html

Thomas, reading through the link it says:

 

 the house "dresses" in summer and "undressing" winter sun through facades and roof skin. To achieve this architects used two types of skin: one based on fixed horizontal wood slats and other mobile pallet, which can be opened individually to control solar radiation. It also serves as ingenious aesthetic finish to help integrate it into its rural surroundings.

 

Now I'm not fluent in 'architect' but my guess is that the it acts both as decoration and a louver/shutter system to provide ventilation.  Striking design, though.

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oscarpears

Very impressive and as you say in a Philippine context you wouldn't have to make it so ambitious, just insulate it well so it doesn't become like an oven in the sunshine.

Having it on concrete pillars and raised well off the ground would help in flooding, keep out rats and vermin and allow easy access to the plumbing entering and leaving the house.

With just 2 containers you could simply cut off one side of each container, join the two containers together so that you have a large square space to divide up, it would look and feel much less like a container. 

I think it is a great idea and the more imagination you have the more interesting and innovative you can be.

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Scotsbloke

So this has nothing to do with either container homes or Philippines but I watched another episode of Grand Designs on The Tube and thought other members would enjoy it.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kseIyujyp0Q

 

The gist of it is an ex Royal Marines officer who lost 3 limbs from IED in Helmand going on to build a home suitable both for his needs as a triple amputee and the needs of his growing family.

 

It isn't soppy or sentimental but is pretty inspirational.

Edited by Scotsbloke

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Look at these exterior panels on the container house. Do they have any practical purpose or just decorative?

 

Casa+Manifesto+Recycled+shipping+contain

 

Photo source http://www.prefabcontainerhomes.org/2013/02/casa-manifesto-recycled-shipping.html

 

I think the shipping pallets stuck to the exterior make the whole house look butt ugly. They could have achieved the same effect (shading the exterior walls) with some horizontal beams covered by vertical slats (running the entire height of the walls), and they wouldn't have destroyed the clean lines of an otherwise innovative house. I do like how they extended the exterior finish above the actual roof line. It could provide a widow's walk sort of balcony on the roof, which would add to the usable space of the home, and the exterior sheathing could serve as railing. They should have thought the design through a bit further before deciding on the exterior finish. It could have been so much better.

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Headshot

Scott, I changed the topic title, so you aren't off-topic in your own thread.

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riklynbor

I looked into using containers to build a house in Philippines but the cost of buying them was too high and then the problem of transporting them to the site.

 

You cannot say the house was a cheap house to build. Im sure conventional materials would have cost the same or less.

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RogerDat

Greetings! In the US they are I belive using the containers that are no longer ship a ble on ships in international trade. Some are insulated, but if don't meet standards, they just take up space, and are therfore much cheeper.

The ones in interisland trade in Cebu are not acceptiable for international  trade, but are OK for in country use.

See the small green ones near SM in reclamation.

By the time they are cheep here, they are pretty much scrap.

They do use them here for work sight offices, and I have been in one. No insulation, so a sweat box.

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So this has nothing to do with either container homes or Philippines but I watched another episode of Grand Designs on The Tube and thought other members would enjoy it.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kseIyujyp0Q

 

The gist of it is an ex Royal Marines officer who lost 3 limbs from IED in Helmand going on to build a home suitable both for his needs as a triple amputee and the needs of his growing family.

 

It isn't soppy or sentimental but is pretty inspirational.

 

Wow! OK...you've sold me on this series. Now I am watching every episode of this series I can find. There are so many great designs ideas exposed in this series...and yet so many realities of actually constructing a custom home are brought to the forefront. This series should be mandatory viewing for anybody thinking about building their own home...using any building technique and using any building materials.

 

It shows graphically the difference between dreams and realities, but also shows how dreams can be modified without destroying the intended aesthetics of the home. I also watched the episode on the cliff house, which really showed that Murphy (as in Murphy's Law) is alive and well. You have to remember that innovation cannot just stop at the design, but must also (even more importantly) be used in overcoming the unexpected (or initially ignored) problems that threaten to destroy the dream. It also graphically shows that if you cut off your options, you will likely also cut off the ability to succeed in completing your project as designed.

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philuk

I have watched most if not all of these programes,

also the australian version of the programe,

 

Look out for the one where one guy builds his dream home out of old car tyres, and another great one where the guy builds a hexigan timber building and uses a tree stump to buil his stairs around,

 

Great programe, with some very interesting builds.

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