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tourist visa extension up to 24 months

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hyaku

I was just trying to be precise. No intention to offend anyone. I do know if you google BOI you get Board of Investment. Usually if I post what I hope is useful information gained from living here a while nobody takes a blind bit of notice anyway and just carry on like a blinkered horse. 

 

I'm into my second year with two six month visas which do not have to be consecutive and never left the house once to do any of it. The courier does it all in Cebu for a minimal fee. No suicidal VHire trips, banca rides or time wasted.

 

The stickers are aimed at cutting out wet stamp corruption in BI and not aimed at making it 'convenient' for foreigners. That's not from me it never usually is. Its from a BI attorney. :twocents:

Edited by hyaku
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easy44

 

 

Usually if I post what I hope is useful information gained from living here a while nobody takes a blind bit of notice anyway and just carry on like a blinkered horse.

 

Par for the course.  They don't pay attention unless they think you made a mistake, then they get excited!

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Busted Dick

Slightly off-topic in that I am not applying for an extension up to 24 months but just wanted to point out how easy I have found my latest experiences with Immigration. Obtained a 59-day visa waiver on entry at Mactan in February, damage was around 3k (may have been slightly more or slightly less, I have lost the receipts).  Been to immigration at J-Mall today, arrived at lunchtime which would have been a disastrous time to attend a few years ago but was out within 40 mins.  They had my ACR card which I failed to collect last year, waiting for me.  Extended by 6 months, cost 9600.

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miles-high

Just wondering... what are the advantages of syating in the country long term on a tourist visa?

 

What are pros and cons of other visas available to those retirees who are married to the Philippine passport holders?

Edited by miles-high

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Journeyer

Just wondering... what are the advantages of syating in the country long term on a tourist visa?

 

What are pros and cons of other visas available to those retirees who are married to the Philippine passport holders?

 

Tourist visas have no requirements except extending your visa, that's the main advantage.

 

Retirement visas require a bunch of clearances, plus dropping $20k into a Phil bank, or $10k if you're getting a pension.

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TheWhiteKnight

Tourist visas have no requirements except extending your visa, that's the main advantage.

 

Retirement visas require a bunch of clearances, plus dropping $20k into a Phil bank, or $10k if you're getting a pension.

 

Yup and if you are married to a Filipina or former Filipina you could just live on the BB stamp, and take 1 yearly trip and be golden for a while. Must enter with your wife though. I know a lot of blokes doing this for decades.

 

I'm getting the SRRV, I don't want to be tied to a woman, and I'm sick of onward tickets and trips to BI and the damn ECC requirements.

Edited by TheWhiteKnight

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NOSOCALPINOY

What are pros and cons of other visas available to those retirees who are married to the Philippine passport holders?

We're now slightly straying off the main topic, but another question pops into my mind, What are pros and cons of other visas available to those retirees who are married to a non Philippine passport holder, aka a "former Filipino citizen"? Answer:The SRRVisa, where the Filipina spouse is not a dual citizen, but only a naturalized U.S. Citizen. She can apply for an SRRVisa for only a $1,500 bank security deposit, $1,400 application fee and for a small additional fee, she can add her foreigner husband and children on her SRRV application form, but I forgot there is an age requirement I think it's 35 or 50 not certain though and they all can stay in the Philippines indefinite without having to step foot in a BI office ever again and only need to use their foreign passports, ex-military veterans retired or not also have this same option. Just a thought for those Filipinos who do not want to go through the dual citizenship route having to maintain two passports if they want to retire in the Philippines indefinite. The only drawback, they are limited to the size of land or condo that can be purchased.   

Edited by NOSOCALPINOY

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Journeyer

I'm getting the SRRV, I don't want to be tied to a woman, and I'm sick of onward tickets and trips to BI and the damn ECC requirements.

 

I  don't see any better options with the SRRV. Besides the  $1400 application fee and a $360 annual fee, there are the deposits that are only allowed in one bank: Development Bank of the Philippines, with PDIC insurance of only around $11,000

 

35 Years Old & Above: $20,000 - Deposit may not be withdrawn unless you cancel the SRRV

Or

35 to 49 Years Old: $50,000 - May only be withdrawn to purchase a condo, must have permission

50 years old and Above With Pension : $10,000 - May only be withdrawn to purchase a condo, must have permission

50 years old and Above Without Pension: $20,000 - May only be withdrawn to purchase a condo, must have permission

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TheWhiteKnight

I  don't see any better options with the SRRV. Besides the  $1400 application fee and a $360 annual fee, there are the deposits that are only allowed in one bank: Development Bank of the Philippines, with PDIC insurance of only around $11,000

 

35 Years Old & Above: $20,000 - Deposit may not be withdrawn unless you cancel the SRRV

Or

35 to 49 Years Old: $50,000 - May only be withdrawn to purchase a condo, must have permission

50 years old and Above With Pension : $10,000 - May only be withdrawn to purchase a condo, must have permission

50 years old and Above Without Pension: $20,000 - May only be withdrawn to purchase a condo, must have permission

 

 

The benefits are just that you never have to go to BI again, you can avail the ID by mail for 3 years at a time $360x3. You don't pay any exit fees, no need for an ECC, and no travel tax if you are in country less than a year. It's not really about cost savings, it will take like 10+ years to save any money over just doing extensions (maybe not as bad if you include traveling in and out). You will never get harassed for living here on a tourist visa ( I thought this was BS, until I read this thread and apparently people are being given nasty words regarding this). Supposedly you can use the diplomatic lanes at the airport too. 

 

It's not for everyone, but I'm 36, been here 4 years jumping through the hoops. I'll probably be here forever, I want to be legitimate and stay our of the immigration office as much as possible. I don't want to look back in 30-40 years at all the hours wasted dealing with BI/ECC/ONWARD TICKETS. A simple transaction by mail or at the PRA office once every 3 years to stay permanently here and no fees to come and go. Sounds good to me. I'm not retired I don't have time to jump through every new BI hoop. They don't even do the 6 month sticker at my local BI.

 

BTW. You can pick from the list of banks. I trust BDO the most on that list, I don't think they are going anywhere. The DBP is a government bank and is about to merge with Land Bank another government bank. I'd actually feel pretty safe in DBP but I went with BDO.

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Journeyer

It's not for everyone, but I'm 36, been here 4 years jumping through the hoops. I'll probably be here forever, I want to be legitimate and stay our of the immigration office as much as possible. I don't want to look back in 30-40 years at all the hours wasted dealing with BI/ECC/ONWARD TICKETS.

 

If you're traveling frequently and need constant ECC;s, I can see where that makes sense for you.Theoretically you could take the "Smile" plan for 6 years, cancel it, get your $20,000 refunded,and apply for citizenship which is the real legitimate option with real benefits.

 

But if stay in the Philippines you would only need an ECC once every three years, and that's the only time you need to personally visit the BoI, since there are people who can extend your Visa for you. So just four trips to BoI in ten years, and then eligible for citizenship.

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TheWhiteKnight

If you're traveling frequently and need constant ECC;s, I can see where that makes sense for you.Theoretically you could take the "Smile" plan for 6 years, cancel it, get your $20,000 refunded,and apply for citizenship which is the real legitimate option with real benefits.

 

But if stay in the Philippines you would only need an ECC once every three years, and that's the only time you need to personally visit the BoI, since there are people who can extend your Visa for you. So just four trips to BoI in ten years, and then eligible for citizenship.

 

Yes, I want to be a citizen (I'm actually 25% pinoy, dad is citizen) but it's unclear if the SRRV would help, nor would my time served as a tourist. You must be a resident for 10 years (5 years if married) but the SRRV is a non immigrant visa, and I don't know if my time as tourist counts as residency either. I'm going to try one day eventually but I'm not holding my breath.

 

Best bet for citizenship would be to get married, get the 13a, and apply in 5 years. They don't even call the SRRV a permanent residency visa, it's a visa with an indefinite expiry date. :(

 

A strict interpretation of the law would be that you have to be a legal, permanent resident for 10 years, not just a perpetual tourist.

Edited by TheWhiteKnight

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TheWhiteKnight

If you're traveling frequently and need constant ECC;s, I can see where that makes sense for you.Theoretically you could take the "Smile" plan for 6 years, cancel it, get your $20,000 refunded,and apply for citizenship which is the real legitimate option with real benefits.

 

But if stay in the Philippines you would only need an ECC once every three years, and that's the only time you need to personally visit the BoI, since there are people who can extend your Visa for you. So just four trips to BoI in ten years, and then eligible for citizenship.

 

"He/she must have resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten (10) years;" - I don't know if you are really residing here if you are just extending your TOURIST visa every 2-6 months. Also not sure what continuous really means in their eyes.

 

As for the ECC - I do leave at least once a year for 30 days to the US for work and to resupply, and I like to travel to other SEA counties for short trips. I've gotta stay sane, being locked up here, 3 years at a time hoping for it to count for a citizenship that may never materialize would drive me insane.

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Journeyer

You may not need to wait 10 years: "The naturalization law only applies to people who don’t have a jus sanguine right to citizenship. Jus sanguinis means “right of blood,” and it refers to the right of becoming a citizen if your parents hold the same citizenship. According to Filipino law, a person born after 1935 has a right to obtain Philippine citizenship if he has either a father or a mother who is Filipino. This applies regardless of whether you were born in the Philippines or abroad.."

 

 

"He/she must have resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten (10) years;" - I don't know if you are really residing here if you are just extending your TOURIST visa every 2-6 months. Also not sure what continuous really means in their eyes.

 

Valid questions. Another valid question is do you get your $20,000 (SRRV Smile plan) refunded if you cancel and opt for citizenship, or only if you cancel and leave the Philippines. Unfortunately I have to assume only a Filipino attorney could answer these questions.

Edited by Journeyer

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TheWhiteKnight

You may not need to wait 10 years: "Apply for citizenship if have lived legally in the Philippines for at least 10 years. The naturalization law only applies to people who don’t have a jus sanguine right to citizenship. Jus sanguinis means “right of blood,” and it refers to the right of becoming a citizen if your parents hold the same citizenship. According to Filipino law, a person born after 1935 has a right to obtain Philippine citizenship if he has either a father or a mother who is Filipino. This applies regardless of whether you were born in the Philippines or abroad.."

 

 

 

Valid questions. Another valid question is do you get your $20,000 (SRRV Smile plan) refunded if you cancel and opt for citizenship, or only if cancel and leave the Philippines. Unfortunately  have to assume only a Filipino attorney could answer these questions.

 

I wouldn't believe them even if they said it, these guys will tell you anything. Maybe if it was an attorney at the BI.  I'm sure you can get the deposit back but it takes a while they gotta see if you have some outstanding debts. I'm not worried about that really. If they accept the premise that I was a resident while on the SRRV at all.

 

Yeah unfortunately my dad was already naturalized and no longer a citizen of PH at the time of my birth. I beat this to death trying to find anyway that I would qualify. He got it back recently but only kids 21 or under are covered under that. 

 

I hope that it at least gives me some points when I apply. I don't look pinoy at all, and I'm not fluent yet, but I will surely be in 10 years.  No one would have ever dreamed I'd visit or let alone live here for the rest of my life haha.

I wouldn't believe them even if they said it, these guys will tell you anything. Maybe if it was an attorney at the BI.  I'm sure you can get the deposit back but it takes a while they gotta see if you have some outstanding debts. I'm not worried about that really. If they accept the premise that I was a resident while on the SRRV at all.

 

Yeah unfortunately my dad was already naturalized and no longer a citizen of PH at the time of my birth. I beat this to death trying to find anyway that I would qualify. He got it back recently but only kids 21 or under are covered under that. 

 

I hope that it at least gives me some points when I apply. I don't look pinoy at all, and I'm not fluent yet, but I will surely be in 10 years.  No one would have ever dreamed I'd visit or let alone live here for the rest of my life haha.

 

Other downsides to citizenship is that it might be at risk if you keep using your US passport, and PH is one of the only 3 countries that taxes its resident citizens on their worldwide income. Suddenly my income from the US would become taxable in PH if I were a citizen. I don't plan to be working in 10 years though, so well see.

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Journeyer

  my income from the US would become taxable in PH if I were a citizen.

 

:o I did not know that. 

 

I found a list of SRRV benefits, not sure it's worth 20 (or 50) large though, in my situation at least:

  1. Permanent non-immigrant status with multiple-entry privileges through the Special Resident Retiree's Visa;
  2. Exemption from customs duties and taxes for the importation of personal effects;
  3. Exemption from Exit Clearance and Re-entry Permits;
  4. Exemption from payment of travel tax provided the retiree has not stayed in the Philippines for more than one year from date of his last entry into the country;
  5. Conversion of the requisite deposit into active investments, including purchase of condominium unit;
  6. Interest on the foreign currency deposit is tax-free and payable to retiree in Philippine Pesos;
  7. Foreign currency time deposit can be converted into Philippine Pesos deposit, but interest is subject to withholding tax;
  8. Pension, annuities remitted to the Philippines are tax-free; and
  9. Guaranteed repatriation of the requisites deposit including invested profits, capital gains and dividends accrued from investments, upon compliance with Bangko Sentral rules and regulations.

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