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tourist visa extension up to 24 months

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Mari M

Yes, basically.  After your one year BB expires, you can go and start getting 2 month extensions, like a tourist visa.  Not sure if you can get 6 month extensions because they have some restrictions on the timing of those.  You can continue until you have been in the Philippines for a total of 36 months.  At that time you must leave the country.

Thank you. How much are the 2 mos. and 6 mos. extensions? Also, what are the restrictions?

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easy44

Thank you. How much are the 2 mos. and 6 mos. extensions? Also, what are the restrictions?

Most of the time it's P2830 for a 2 month extension, but at certain points there are additional charges. The Philippine Bureau of Immigration has a listing of all extension fees on their website. I'm not on my computer right now so I don't have those handy.

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Woolf

Here is the list of fees at immigration

 

The samples is like you never been to the philippines before,

sometimes the fees are lower depending on your history with immigration

 

http://www.immigration.gov.ph/index.php/visa-requirements/non-immigrant-visa/temporary-visitor-visa/extension-of-authorized-stay-beyond-59-days

 

There was or is a restriction on the 6 month visa, they would not issue if it brought you over 16 months

so maybe you can only get 6 month up until 16 months, I do not know if that restriction has been lifted

 

Long stay visa info (6 months)

 

http://www.immigration.gov.ph/index.php/visa-requirements/non-immigrant-visa/temporary-visitor-visa/long-stay-visitor-visa-extension-lsvve

Edited by Woolf
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Woolf

Hmm  I forgot

 

The list of fees may not be updated with the sticker fee (100 php)

 

So you may have to add 100 PHP

 

and if you renew in jan feb you may have to add 300 PHP for annual report

Edited by Woolf
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SkyMan

So when my husband and I arrive there, he'll get a BB stamp good for 1 year. Does he still have to leave the country before the BB is up? Or he can just go to BOI to extend every 6 months, and then only leave PI just before the 36th month?

Either option would work.  Either extend 1,(you'd only do 1 month if leaving within the next month) 2, or 6 months at a time up to 36 total including the 1 year BB.  Or the 2 of you could leave and come back and he'd start a new year of BB.  Another option that is for him to get a 13A permanent resident visa before the BB runs out.  It has a high up front cost but is cheaper than a year of extensions.  If he does that here while on the BB he'll have to do it twice.  The first time is probationary and good for one year, then he repeats the process to make it a permanent visa, but he doesn't get the benefit of the 1 year BB stamp.  If he does it now at the RP embassy in the US, It's permanent on arrival.  One drawback to the 13A is that it will cost him an extra p3K to leave the country so if he plans on frequent travel  the 13A might not be the best option.  It does have the advantage that he can work without any special permit if he considers that.

 

 

 

There was or is a restriction on the 6 month visa, they would not issue if it brought you over 16 months so maybe you can only get 6 month up until 16 months, I do not know if that restriction has been lifted

I think NoSoCal wasa doing a  BB and then 4 6mo extensions.  May only be able to do that in Manila though.

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SkyMan

Thank you. How much are the 2 mos. and 6 mos. extensions? Also, what are the restrictions?

The 2 month extension costs vary each time you go so there is a  bunch of fees plus p500 per month extension so if 2 months is p3K, 1 month would be p2500 andad a month later another p2500k.  Unfortunately for the 6 month extension is doesn't work that way.  The 6 month extension is the total cost of what 3 2 month extensions would be so your paying all the 2 month extension fees 3 times.  The savings for a 6 month extension is making only one trip to the BI vise 3.

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NOSOCALPINOY

'Woolf', on 14 Feb 2015 - 01:13 AM, said: There was or is a restriction on the 6 month visa, they would not issue if it brought you over 16 months so maybe you can only get 6 month up until 16 months, I do not know if that restriction has been lifted

 

I think NoSoCal wasa doing a  BB and then 4 6mo extensions.  May only be able to do that in Manila though.

Yeah, I was doing the every 6 month 9a tourist visa extensions under the BB Program and I got my 6 month extensions prior to my BB stamp's expiration at our local BI field office up to an additional stay of 24 month on top of my BB 1 yr stamp, for a total stay of 3 yrs. We're in N. California now on vacation and upon our return to the Philippines I'll get a BB stamp. I am in the process of obtaining my permanent resident visa eventually under the Special SRRV for retired U.S. military where the deposit is for only $1,500. Anyway, I'll see how it goes. I know of one other member on another forum, lives just minutes away from us and who has done the Special SRRV and we had a meet up before we left for California just so to give me some helpful pointers how to go about it.

Do not confuse my 6 month extensions under the BB Program with the LSSVE long stay of every 6 month extensions meant for the regular tourist on their 59 day visa, prior to it's expiration can request the LSVVE every 6 month extension up to a 36 month stay at any of the BI Regional offices in Manila, Cebu and or in Davao. 

Edited by NOSOCALPINOY
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tambok

I stayed on tourist visas for 6 months. Then as I was leaving, an immigration officer looked at the extensions and said. "If you extend beyond six months and stay on tourist visas only, it's no good. You can be black-listed" . She then counted the extensions and it was under 6 months. - some 5 months and 28 days. She didn't say anything and just stamped it. This is why I never try to stay beyond six months at a time.

 

Gentlemen,  the anecdotal logic of "it never happened to me" does not prove anything. If it did not happen to you, it may, and it possibly will soon because many people are reporting it. My friend also got yelled at and was given the 3d degree. You have just been lucky so far. Your luck may run out, too.

 

The local culture is often not very logical or predictable. Rules may say one thing, then an individual may say another, and that individual may have the power not to admit you into the country or blacklist you. So, it's no laughing matter, and the "it never happened to me" may then become " oh shucks, I am blacklisted now." Immigration is no joke and nothing to be cavalier about- they can simply cross out your entire life in that country and --as a non citizen, you will have very little recourse to reestablish it.

 

As a side note: when I arrive into/leave the country I look at the immigration booths and try and see who is in them. The younger they are, the less nasty they tend to be. Young men ( under 40) are probably the best, followed by young women ( under 30)

 

30+ year old women already start getting bossy and asking questions and raising their chins at you. Middle aged and older men can also be pretty bad. Some start puffing up and flashing their eyes at you for no reason. You did not break any laws but they still want to be bad to you. Some start growling- "What're you doing here? What're you doing here in the Philippines?"

 

Cebu immigration booths from my experience have the biggest number of nosy,  bossy and unpleasant officers ( and also many friendly ones- but still not too professional- a toss up and luck of the draw). 

 

The best place to leave and enter-- in my opinion-- is Angeles City /Clark. Many Americans and other Westerners live there- all retired, and many on tourist visas. It's a daily sight for them there.

 

Manila is a toss-up. I just try and avoid any line where there is a dour looking middle aged person inside- be it male or female.

Edited by tambok

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Woolf

Depending on nationality tourists can stay for 24 or 36 months

 

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php/faqs/extensionofstay

 

  1. How long can I extend my in the Philippines?

Under Immigration Memorandum Circular No. SBM-2013-003, non-visa required national may extend their stay up to thirty six (36) months while visa required national may extend their stay up to twenty four (24) months.

Note: The said periods shall be counted from the date of the applicant’s latest recorded arrival.

 

 

 

All the immigration officers  I have met, have all been very professional independent of age

 

Edited by Woolf

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KennyF

 

 

I stayed on tourist visas for 6 months. Then as I was leaving, an immigration officer looked at the extensions and said. "If you extend beyond six months and stay on tourist visas only, it's no good. You can be black-listed" . She then counted the extensions and it was under 6 months. - some 5 months and 28 days. She didn't say anything and just stamped it. This is why I never try to stay beyond six months at a time.

 

You don't mention your nationality but most Western nationalities are allowed to stay 36 months as a tourist.

 

I think the immigration guy was having a laugh at your expense.

 

KonC

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tambok

19 out of 20 officers have been nice. But since I must have met hundreds of them, there are a few odd balls and ignoramuses among them, too. One got on my case and said that Americans used an abused the Filipinos. One said that Americans are welcome in the Philippines but not Filipinos in America while glowering at me.

 

Some may be having a bad day or a grudge against a certain nationality/jealousy/resentment. Or because some porener acted bad before you, he will take it out on you.

 

I have noticed that the ones who did were always middle aged. Therefore, I try to minimize my chances by choosing younger ones. When I can.

 

All such experiences are anecdotal and are subject to the wild card of luck. In no way I will be blaming myself for them. I don't say a word when I am there, am always dressed OK and look OK.

 

I think the immigration guy was having a laugh at your expense.

 

Actually, it was a woman- a middle aged one. Having a laugh or being nasty or simply not knowing the rules. I knew better not to argue.

 

My friend in Manila went to extend beyond 6 months, and they called him upstairs. The supervisor started interrogating him and asking him what he was doing in the Philippines in a very angry way.  He told him that he could not be living in the Philippines on a tourist visa. Period. Regardless of what those newspapers say.

 

He had to go to Jakarta and reenter.

 

It's the luck of the draw. Some people are lucky and don't run into such arbitrary situations with weird officers who bend the law any way they want, and some aren't. If it didn't happen to you, thank your lucky stars. But it may in the future. You never know. The officer may have been watching a show on TV about some Amerikano who had broken the law and now he is angry and will treat all white people bad.

 

In the Philippines, laws do not seem to be written in stone. They are often interpreted by different people in different ways.

 

All the immigration officers  I have met, have all been very professional independent of age

 

 Lucky you, congrats! In my case, it has not been all officers, it has been most officers- some are not so friendly and -- they have discretionary powers. We all need to be aware of those because as you stay longer or live in more places, your chances of running into them increase.

 

In the Philippines, things can always happen in illogical, flukey and unpredictable ways. It's always good to be prepared by reading about different experiences different people have had here without automatically denying it or blaming the victim. Because if you keep saying to yourself- "never happened to me"- (therefore it doesn't happen(?), "all the people have been nice", "everything has been fine", when such things do happen, you will be ill prepared to deal with them.

Edited by tambok
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Skywalker

Wow, I am very surprised to read your last post.

 

It differs from my experiences with the BoI in Mandaue by leaps and bounds.  The staff in Mandaue have always been very professional in my experience.

 

I guess I've been lucky.

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Headshot

One said that Americans are welcome in the Philippines but not Filipinos in America while glowering at me.

 

You should have told him there are more Filipinos in the US than there are Americans in the Philippines...and that the US will allow Filipinos to become US citizens if they wish...without having to get special dispensation from the president.

Edited by Headshot
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tambok

Wow, I am very surprised to read your last post.

 

It differs from my experiences with the BoI in Mandaue by leaps and bounds.  The staff in Mandaue have always been very professional in my experience.

 

I guess I've been lucky.

 

Hope your luck holds. I've been coming to the PH since 1991 and have met a full gamut of people there. Some super nice and super hospitable and some - real devils. Most are OK. And I must admit that the Mandaue office has been nice to me, too. Never had a problem with them. It's at the entry/exit points into/from Manila and sometimes Cebu, that they would make remarks and glower at me.  And the refusal to extend to my friend also happened in Manila. The woman who told me that a person living on extensions past 6 months may get black listed was also in Manila.

 

Once in Davao I got an extension, and I thanked the officer and told him that I was going to travel around Mindanao. He smiled and said" Yes, and you will be able to taste many young girls". How professional is that?

 

One British guy while getting his permanent residency was told " We want your money, we don't want you in this country".

 

All kinds of people work at the BOI, you see?

 

You should have told him there are more Filipinos in the US than there are Americans in the Philippines...and that the US will allow Filipinos to become US citizens if they wish...without having to get special dispensation from the president.

 

I told him it was for economic reasons. He let me in with a frowny nod. 

 

One also cannot deny the fact that US tourist visas are not issued to Filipinos that easily. If at all- except to very professional ones and the ones with money/property.

 

While we have problems after arrival in the PH as far as our "civil rights" go- we have none; they have problems with getting into the US period. Most cannot get the visa to even visit a dying relative . And petitioning someone who is not a wife/husband to come may take 16 years or longer.

 

However, if they manage to get in, that is when the sweetness starts. The can get jobs easily because they are a minority, they organize political groups to prevent deportations and fight discrimination and, if legal, the society is very open to them. They rise in the military and the government while the Phil gov't and military is closed to naturalized citizens, period.

 

US based Filipinos look the happiest among all the immigrants I had met there. The men swagger like they own the place, the women have their noses up in the air- they've got it made there. They drop their accent in English within a year - or they don't have one to begin with. Many are a subject of bitter envy from other Asians who have to struggle with learning English and the American way while the Pinoys just whistle thru the whole thing.

 

It all balances itself in the end. We come and can live a sweet life with some ,but they face different benefits and different obstacles in our country, too- the biggest one is the inability of an average Filipino to even visit there.

Edited by tambok
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Headshot

One also cannot deny the fact that US tourist visas are not issued to Filipinos that easily.

 

True, but at the same time, one cannot deny that immigration visas to the Philippines are not ever issued to Americans (or any other foreigner for that matter) unless they are totally rolling in dough (uber-rich).

 

My wife now has a US tourist visa, but we had to really jump through hoops to get it.

Edited by Headshot

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