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You often see negative comments about helping people in the Philippines, so it is nice to read of an example that worked out, helped the people concerned, and didnt cost the "wealthy foreigner" anything.

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Good stuff RBS. Well done. Miss C and her family sound like really great people.

 

I've been married into a goood family of hardworking filipino people for 22 years and never had a bad experience with them. They've never asked for anything and when I have contributed to things like paying medical bills, they are incredibly grateful.

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bradders9999

Congratulations RBS on a great job!! :mellow:

 

I'm doing no more than adding to the majority who have posted their favourable responce in recognition of your novel way of helping a poor family achieve their goals which, without your help and guidence, would have probably never been more than a dream!

 

As you stated Papa did not respond favourably to your initial offer (lost his voice!) hoping you - as most have done - would simply 'gift' all the money up front and assume it would change their lives for the better - forever!

 

Any form of financial assistance will help for a period of time - often a short period! - but you provided a 'business plan' with an incentive which has worked more than well to date and makes for very pleasant reading - unlike my experience!!

 

During my visit to the Phils I responded to the request of a lady who, like most, needed a capital injection to kick-start her own business which I admit sounded quite plausible and she offered to repay me over a period of time, so I helped her. However, not long after leaving the Phils I received an email informing me her handbag had been snatched on the pier which, among other things, contained the cash - and - yes you've all guessed!! - could I send her more money. Being Mr. Softy and giving her the benefit of the doubt by believing her story I sent a few $ BUT added that would be the LAST time. I've not heard from her since. :(

 

But that's digressing and appreciate such tales belong on another thread - so back to topic...

 

I'll be moving soon to take up residence in the Phils and somewhere down the line I'll most likely (again) join the ranks of many who have helped, or at least tried to help, genuinely poor people. However, should I do so I will try to mirror your tried and tested method which I believe makes a great deal of sense!

 

May your expansion plans for the same fortuneate family continue to prove as succesful as the first venture - I see no reason why not as Papa has responded admireably to your plan(s) and no doubt the two sons look forward to mirroring the changed fortunes Papa (and family) have enjoyed!! I sincerely hope so!!

 

Please let me/us know when your next in Cebu - it would be a pleasure to meet you and Miss C and maybe even her blessed family!!

 

Keep up the good work RBS and thanks for sharing your success story with us!! A VERY pleasant change from the norm!!

 

Merry Christmas!

Bradders

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5. Now all of a sudden Miss C. has 45 K in her bank account. Wow?

This includes the P20k (half of which is theoretically mine)

 

jew-bwa-ha-ha.gif

 

 

So in 11 months you only gave her 10K ? ? ?

 

She should be looking for someone a little more generous.

 

I understand everything about trying to teach someone the value of money. But I have to agree with Scandy on a few points.... and YES I do understand Filipino Cutlture.

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So in 11 months you only gave her 10K ? ? ?

 

She should be looking for someone a little more generous.

 

I understand everything about trying to teach someone the value of money. But I have to agree with Scandy on a few points.... and YES I do understand Filipino Cutlture.

 

Read the thread fully! He did it right as far as I'm concerned.

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Read the thread fully! He did it right as far as I'm concerned.

 

 

I did read the entire thread.... including Scandy's posts.

 

If her was not romantically involved if would be different.

 

I love hearing great business start up stories and I love reading good romance stories.... some how these 2 topics where blured.

 

What is really ment by "Filipino Culture" here ? Does it mean when you lend a Filipino money they see it as a gift ?

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I did read the entire thread.... including Scandy's posts.

 

If her was not romantically involved if would be different.

 

I love hearing great business start up stories and I love reading good romance stories.... some how these 2 topics where blured.

 

What is really ment by "Filipino Culture" here ? Does it mean when you lend a Filipino money they see it as a gift ?

 

Who is Scandy? I must be dense! LOL

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I did read the entire thread.... including Scandy's posts.

 

If her was not romantically involved if would be different.

 

I love hearing great business start up stories and I love reading good romance stories.... some how these 2 topics where blured.

 

What is really ment by "Filipino Culture" here ? Does it mean when you lend a Filipino money they see it as a gift ?

I doubt that you do understand Filipino culture very well.

 

Many Filipino people (particularly the poorer, less well educated people of the Philippines) live a rather communal - some may even say communistic - life. This does not mean that "when you lend a Filipino money they see it as a gift".

 

On more than a few occasions, I have lent money to Filipinos for various worthwhile reasons, only to have to chase them up for repayments. When asked why they were not making their repayments, a common response is "but you are richer than me so you do not need the money". It is not that they consider it a gift, it is just that they see you as one who does not need the money - so why repay.

 

As for my business experiences in the Philippines, I have been doing business (and paying my taxes) in the Philippines for the past 14 years. During that time some of my more major business ventures have been -

  • Purchased a 3.5ha coconut plantation (Or. Midoro) - still successful.
  • Purchased a 500 sq.m lot and built a small 60 sq.m house on it (Oriental Mindoro) - still own.
  • Opened and operated a professional business (Cebu) - was successful then closed as I needed the staff in Australia.
  • Invested in a tourist venture (Bohol) - a failure.
  • Invested in a sari-sari (Manila) - failure.
  • Sponsored 7 students through high school (Or. Mindoro) - successful.
  • Invested in a fruit & vegetable trader (Cebu) - failure.
  • Guest lecturer at the University of Cebu - not really a business venture, but good to establish contacts with possible future employees.
  • Invested in an import business (Manila) - still successful.
  • Invested in a fishing venture (Bohol) - successful.

I am currently working on re-establishing the Cebu business. This will take a year or so to properly get off the ground as I need to train in Australia some of my Filipino staff.

 

With the above background, I am becoming more successful in my business dealings (and learning business culture) in the Philippines. I do not expect to get rich from the Philippines, however I do hope to be able to semi-retire there within a few years.

Edited by RBS
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mattwilkie
I doubt that you do understand Filipino culture very well.

 

Many Filipino people (particularly the poorer, less well educated people of the Philippines) live a rather communal - some may even say communistic - life. This does not mean that "when you lend a Filipino money they see it as a gift".

* The thing is making it very plain the money needs to be repaid and when. I have people who borrow but also have invested in businesses, never had a problem yet of repayments because they know it has to be repaid. They dont get it otherwise *

 

As for my business experiences in the Philippines, I have been doing business (and paying my taxes) in the Philippines for the past 14 years. During that time some of my more major business ventures have been -

  • Purchased a 3.5ha coconut plantation (Or. Midoro) - still successful.
  • Purchased a 500 sq.m lot and built a small 60 sq.m house on it (Oriental Mindoro) - still own.
  • Opened and operated a professional business (Cebu) - was successful then closed as I needed the staff in Australia.
  • Invested in a tourist venture (Bohol) - a failure.
  • Invested in a sari-sari (Manila) - failure.
  • Sponsored 7 students through high school (Or. Mindoro) - successful.
  • Invested in a fruit & vegetable trader (Cebu) - failure.
  • Guest lecturer at the University of Cebu - not really a business venture, but good to establish contacts with possible future employees.
  • Invested in an import business (Manila) - still successful.
  • Invested in a fishing venture (Bohol) - successful.

 

Its good to see someone else doing trial and error. Im in a similar situation i expect some to need reworking but i doubt things will fail as its all down to returns. e.g. If its a business thats struggling to make an income it may take 10 years to repay instead of 3. But it will still repay main thing is that the operators are getting an income out of it and if i have to reduce my margin to get my cash back I will im in no rush. I think a lot of the business failures are down to people thinking people know the business and trusting too much. Although my ventures have other people managing they know i check the stock, investment value and profit margins regular to make sure they are all working in balance. Working a fixed perecentage helps as you can monitor if there are any leaks of cash or stocks as it shows up on a daily basis as no matter what figures are coming in as long as they are all balancing your margin will never change.

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.... Although my ventures have other people managing they know i check the stock, investment value and profit margins regular to make sure they are all working in balance. Working a fixed perecentage helps as you can monitor if there are any leaks of cash or stocks as it shows up on a daily basis as no matter what figures are coming in as long as they are all balancing your margin will never change.

I had not thought of that approach. I'll keep it in mind for when it is possible to use in my "checks and balances" with business management. Thank you for the heads up.

Edited by RBS
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David Kennedy
I doubt that you do understand Filipino culture very well.

 

Many Filipino people (particularly the poorer, less well educated people of the Philippines) live a rather communal - some may even say communistic - life. This does not mean that "when you lend a Filipino money they see it as a gift".

 

On more than a few occasions, I have lent money to Filipinos for various worthwhile reasons, only to have to chase them up for repayments. When asked why they were not making their repayments, a common response is "but you are richer than me so you do not need the money". It is not that they consider it a gift, it is just that they see you as one who does not need the money - so why repay.

 

One doesn't have to be Filipino to understand or evaluate the culture. Glorifying as some marvelous bit of your culture is head in the sand thinking. What you've just described is considering the loan as a gift -period.

 

I don't see the way of life as communal, I see it as tribal, and I've got long term first hand experience. That tribal thinking is THE primary cause of poverty in the Philippines. Not the mysterious 90 families that control the country, but rather at the local level, with the willingness of family members to support those who should be supporting themselves being the worst offense. Which keeps that working person broke, and the welfare recepients are immedately broke once again after the welfare stops.

 

I can't tell you how many lazy Filipinos I've put to sleep reciting ways they could earn money..

Edited by David Kennedy
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O

I don't see the way of life as communal, I see it as tribal, and I've got long term first hand experience. That tribal thinking is THE primary cause of poverty in the Philippines. Not the mysterious 90 families that control the country, but rather at the local lever the willingness of family members to support those who should be supporting themselves. Which keeps that working person broke, and the welfare recepients are immedately broke once again after the welfare stops.

 

I can't tell you how many lazy Filipinos I've put to sleep reciting ways they could earn money..

 

Agreed...Living in a province i saw plenty of examples of sittin on your ass all day....but i also saw some good examples of working your ass off....there was a neighbour who washed clothes for a living...she would be out there rain hail shine or darkness till the job was done...and 1 particular local trike driver...he always greeted me as he rode between the mall etc and the backblocks if i was walking or hanging outside..so i got to notice him amongst the countless others.....he must of done 100 trips a day/night ! :)

 

These guys must have 24 on 24 off B)

 

post-2095-1230683874_thumb.jpg

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David Kennedy

There's a Filipina in a certain chatroom from Bohol who said she sent home 12 balikbayan boxes this Christmas from the US. When I mentioned there are always taxis available for rent in Cebu that those relatives from Bohol could drive to earn their own income, she just started talking to someone else...

 

The great cultural ball and chain clamped onto whoever is lucky (?) enough to have income or marry a foreigner only results in the poor staying poor.

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