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Solar: A practical investment in the Philippines?


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Interesting topic. The cost of electricity in the philippines is high. Is solar power practical to invest in? Anyone have a setup in the philippines?

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Is solar power practical to invest in?

 

It depends on:

 

1. What grid power costs, per kilowatt hour, locally.

2. What the overall cost to set up an off-grid system would be - if going off-grid.

 

To go with a grid tied system would definitely pay for itself. The question is how long that would take, as to whether or not it were a feasible, cost effective way to go. 

 

I use off-grid power for important electronics in Cambodia. I do this, because I know the power I am producing is cleaner and more reliable than what is offered at the power points in my home.

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Is solar power practical to invest in? Anyone have a setup in the philippines?

 

I made some inquires. Currently, a grid tied system will pay back around in 8-9 years (with an average of 11p per kwh), but I think in a year time it could be much better. The costs of panels and inverters are dropping fast, so I guess you can have a 1kwh array below 100k pesos (currently around 130-140). 

 

Also, control your consumption, meaning make it more efficient. I measured all appliances and lights (plus circuits) and I dropped off around 100w with changing bulbs and fixing circuits. I had one circuits where one bulb was eating up additional 40w because it was grounded (or something was wrong). Bulbs (even LEDs) sometimes eat up more than 50% more than declared, so it is important to find good quality (and measure them all before installing fix).  

 

I bought this wattage meter (which can measure very low wattage <2w), so make sure you buy a good meter, some are not as good:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brennenstuhl-1506603-Primera-Wattage-Current/dp/B00I068ZEE

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Thanks guys.

I saw an ad that said 250k pesos to have a solar power setup for homes. That's pretty expensive. And the return would be in years as mentioned. Think this one

<link removed>

I was wondering about the batteries, too. Don't they need to be replaced like normal rechargable batteries? Wouldn't the cost add up after years replacing them?

Our monthly bill is 3k pesos. That's a lot considering we don't use any aircons, no electric heaters like japan, no automatic washing machine. We just use the microwave, toaster, above average size ref, 32 inch led, a couple of fans, desktop, laptops. But that's already 3k. I think too expensive.

Edited by Paul
As a new member, please do not post links. Read the rules.
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I saw an ad that said 250k pesos to have a solar power setup for homes.

That depends on what the 250k inlcudes (how many kwh and if it is grid-tie or of grid with batteries).

 

 

 

I was wondering about the batteries, too

This only comes into play with off grid and yes you are correct, batteries are the killer, thats why it is better and more efficient to go grid-tie. But of course, that depends as well on your needs and the power supply you have (stable or not).

 

3k would tranlsate to around 250-280kwh I suppose, so that is less than 10kw per day, mmmh. I do not know what 32 "inch" led are, but these are a lot of lights ....

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I just saw that they offering 3kwh system for 330k pesos. That is already a good offer and it is getting near where I will start to install (below 100k pesos for 1kwh)

Edited by Paul
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32 inch led tv :)
Seems like a lot of money to invest over 200k pesos then maintain it for how much per year.
3000 per month is just 36000 annually so it would take atleast 7 years to reach the same amount. Wonder if it evens out.

Don't know what is grid-tie. No batteries? How do you store the electricity?

 

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Don't know what is grid-tie. No batteries? How do you store the electricity?

 

That's the thing. You don't. The grid serves as your "battery storage". While your power will still fail during a power cut / brown out, you also do not have the costs of buying and maintaining batteries. This allows you to get a return on your solar array, over ____ years. So, grid tied systems do not use batteries. 

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That looks very interesting. And the price is a lot lower than other setups.

Grid tied setups is something new? Anyone in cebu using solar successfully so far?

 

No!

 

Have been used in denmark for 10  maybe 15 years

 

But it is very new in the philippines

 

Veco is paying you about half per KW, than what you pay them

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Veco is paying you about half per KW, than what you pay them

 

No its not correct (and I think people should start reading the post - it is around the 3 post regarding this). I did a lot of inquiries and had a already some offers. I also contacted Veco (the responsible person for the Solar program). In the Philippines you have Net-Metering. That means you pay only the net between producing and consuming, therefore knocking off exactly the price you should pay (or here is around 11p kwh). Only, producing excess will get you in the situation you describe, then you get generation costs paid out. However, that does not entirly to apply to Veco Solar program. You can get also kwh credits, meaning you can consume them later (and this again Net Metering).

 

This applies to all producer below a 100kwh installation. Above, you go into the commercial league and it is a different story.

 

It will take around 4-6 weeks to apply- see my questions and the answer of Veco below:

 

This is my response to your query.

1. How do we apply?
- With VECO account and good standing record.
- Establish the Solar facility. Net metering program allows only below 100 kW capacity.
- Inverter should be configured in Philippines setting ( refer attached file system standard parameters )
- Application form is available in our VECO full center offices ( SM, Consolacion, Talisay ). 
 
2. What are the requirements of Veco?
- Please see attached file ( checklist of the requirements )
- During testing and commissioning , customer side ( or the solar integrator ) will do the testing and VECO will witness.
- Equipment to use power quality analyzer.
 
3. How long will it take? 
- Considering you comply all the requirements approximately 1 month and 2 weeks.
We will conduct distribution impact study to your system.

 

Hope we have address your questions. Please feel free to email if you have further inquiry about the program.
We look forward hearing from you soon. 
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No its not correct (and I think people should start reading the post - it is around the 3 post regarding this). I did a lot of inquiries and had a already some offers. I also contacted Veco (the responsible person for the Solar program). In the Philippines you have Net-Metering. That means you pay only the net between producing and consuming, therefore knocking off exactly the price you should pay (or here is around 11p kwh). Only, producing excess will get you in the situation you describe, then you get generation costs paid out. However, that does not entirly to apply to Veco Solar program. You can get also kwh credits, meaning you can consume them later (and this again Net Metering).

 

What you describe above is what I was trying to say, maybe I made it toooo short

I have not seen anything about kw/h credit before, when we talk about VECO

Edited by Woolf
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Cgu, I thought I had read somewhere, that VECO was only paying a flat rate per kWh generated by a grid tied system? (Not sure where, now.) 

 

That is very interesting to know, though. 

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Cgu, I thought I had read somewhere, that VECO was only paying a flat rate per kWh generated by a grid tied system? (Not sure where, now.) 

 

That is very interesting to know, though. 

No, the concept of Net Metering is that your meter is "spinning backwards" - how it is actually implemented does not really matter (though Veco will install a bidirectional meter as well). So your consumption is "Net".

 

I responded to Woolf because it sounded like Veco would only pay half the price - the generation costs, which is around 5.7p/kw. This is only true for excess, which they pay back to you (However, I have somewhere a doc, which states that they credit the kwh credit - I have to look for it - but I am not 100% sure anymore). This sounded like an unfair deal from Veco. But it is actually fair, since for excess you only contribute to generation and not to transportation, grid etc. - unless of course it is subsidised by the government.

 

What you mean is maybe above 100kwh production, in which case you are commercially producing electricity. I think I read that in this realm they agree on a fix rate (like they do in Europe) 

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